Steel Frame vs Aluminum Frame w/ Carbon seat stays and carbon fork

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ydm9, Apr 12, 2004.

  1. Ydm9

    Ydm9 Guest

    In general, how does the ride compare between a bike with
    steel frame and a bike with an aluminum frame with carbon
    seat stays and a carbon fork? I realize that there are many
    variables that can affect the ride quality, so I'm just
    asking in general. Just how much of the "road buzz" does the
    carbon stays and fork filter out?
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    ydm9 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >In general, how does the ride compare between a bike with
    >steel frame and a bike with an aluminum frame with carbon
    >seat stays and a carbon fork? I realize that there are many
    >variables that can affect the ride quality, so I'm just
    >asking in general. Just how much of the "road buzz" does
    >the carbon stays and fork filter out?

    There is no "in general" answer to this, you have to compare
    specific complete bicycles if you want to know how they ride
    and even then most comparisons are highly subjective.

    For most recreational riders, their discomfort on the bike
    is a function of bad bike fit and lack of mileage - neither
    problem is affected by frame material.
     
  3. Ydm9

    Ydm9 Guest

    "In general", if you ride a 2003 Trek 2100 which has an
    aluminum frame and DOES NOT have carbon seat stays and
    compare it to a 2004 Trek 2100 which appears to be about the
    same bike WITH carbon seat stays, how much difference is
    there in ride quality?

    [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote in
    message news:<[email protected]
    read.news.verio.net>...
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>, ydm9
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >In general, how does the ride compare between a bike with
    > >steel frame and a bike with an aluminum frame with carbon
    > >seat stays and a carbon fork? I realize that there are
    > >many variables that can affect the ride quality, so I'm
    > >just asking in general. Just how much of the "road buzz"
    > >does the carbon stays and fork filter out?
    >
    > There is no "in general" answer to this, you have to
    > compare specific complete bicycles if you want to know how
    > they ride and even then most comparisons are highly
    > subjective.
    >
    > For most recreational riders, their discomfort on the bike
    > is a function of bad bike fit and lack of mileage -
    > neither problem is affected by frame material.
     
  4. Ydm9

    Ydm9 Guest

    "In general", if you ride a 2003 Trek 2100 which has an
    aluminum frame and DOES NOT have carbon seat stays and
    compare it to a 2004 Trek 2100 which appears to be about the
    same bike WITH carbon seat stays, how much difference is
    there in ride quality? I would think there would be a
    difference in ride quality.

    Forgive me for not being specific about a general question.

    [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote in
    message news:<[email protected]
    read.news.verio.net>...
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>, ydm9
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >In general, how does the ride compare between a bike with
    > >steel frame and a bike with an aluminum frame with carbon
    > >seat stays and a carbon fork? I realize that there are
    > >many variables that can affect the ride quality, so I'm
    > >just asking in general. Just how much of the "road buzz"
    > >does the carbon stays and fork filter out?
    >
    > There is no "in general" answer to this, you have to
    > compare specific complete bicycles if you want to know how
    > they ride and even then most comparisons are highly
    > subjective.
    >
    > For most recreational riders, their discomfort on the bike
    > is a function of bad bike fit and lack of mileage -
    > neither problem is affected by frame material.
     
  5. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    ydm9 top-posted:
    > "In general", if you ride a 2003 Trek 2100 which has an
    > aluminum frame and DOES NOT have carbon seat stays and
    > compare it to a 2004 Trek 2100 which appears to be about
    > the same bike WITH carbon seat stays, how much difference
    > is there in ride quality?

    The only definitive way to tell would be to swap wheels,
    seatpost and saddle between the two models (with identical
    bar tape, too!), and even then fit would probably be the
    most important "ride quality" issue.

    My bike has carbon seat stays and it rides very smoothly,
    TYVM, but I really doubt I'd notice if someone magically
    switched 'em to aluminum. Maybe a 1-2
    % difference in road vibration? Who knows...

    Bill "but they look cool, and of course that's what REALLY
    matters" S.
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    ydm9 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"In general", if you ride a 2003 Trek 2100 which has an
    >aluminum frame and DOES NOT have carbon seat stays and
    >compare it to a 2004 Trek 2100 which appears to be about
    >the same bike WITH carbon seat stays, how much difference
    >is there in ride quality?

    Near zero.

    >I would think there would be a difference in ride quality.

    Then there definitely would be a difference... to you.
     
  7. helen

    helen Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, ydm9
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In general, how does the ride compare between a bike with
    > steel frame and a bike with an aluminum frame with carbon
    > seat stays and a carbon fork? I realize that there are
    > many variables that can affect the ride quality, so I'm
    > just asking in general. Just how much of the "road buzz"
    > does the carbon stays and fork filter out?

    It's all marketing nonsense. I keep hearing about Aluminum
    being "less good" for all day riding. And then I see a
    hundred aluminum bikes on our yearly double century. Then
    there's the guy that rides up to L.A. from Carson or
    somewhere, kills everyone going up to Griffith Park, comes
    back down to babysit the fat yuppers on their Waterfords
    does it while riding a Nishiki in SPD sandals. Tires,
    geometry and seats make a bike feel different. Material
    makes bikes sound different.

    Look at a double diamond bicycle frame. Explain to me how it
    can move enough to matter without either stretching the
    seatpost or compressing the seat stays--the direction where
    the material is almost infinitely strong.

    People just need to make peace with themselves about
    choosing bicycles based on their self-image. For example I
    ride italian iron because I'm of the "Breaking Away"
    generation. It just looks more like a bicyle to me than a
    sloped top fat tube aluminum bike. It suits me but I don't
    need to pretend it's better from an engineering stand point
    to be happy with the fact that it suits me.

    Kurt
     
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