Supplements

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Jim, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Having decided not to invest lots of cash in a disc wheel my attention now turns to supplements.

    Presently, I just use Isostar as and when along with the odd jaffa cake.

    I am wondering if using creatine etc. etc. would help improve my time trialling times.

    Does anyone have practical experience of this and if so, I would welcome your recommendations.

    Thanks, Jim.
     
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  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    David Gillbe wrote:
    > If doing a longer ride (or even a shorter one) absolutely nothing in the world beats good old Malt
    > loaf :)

    Porridge does, but it gets a bit sloppy in the back pocket.

    > only 3% fat

    I like malt loaf but only with a 5mm thick spreading of butter on it. Yummm.

    ~PB
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > David Gillbe wrote:
    > > If doing a longer ride (or even a shorter one) absolutely nothing in the world beats good old
    > > Malt loaf :)
    >
    > Porridge does, but it gets a bit sloppy in the back pocket.

    My Nan (bless her) used to make poridge that wouldn't slop around too much. It was 'orrible.

    >
    > > only 3% fat
    >
    > I like malt loaf but only with a 5mm thick spreading of butter on it. Yummm.

    But that is > 3% fat -- or it is if I spread the butter :(

    T
     
  4. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Go on .............. tee hee

    "Hedgehog & Markarina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Indeed, just been there, very informative... and it's just saved me
    £14.99
    > > :)
    >
    > I hope it supported your original "jaffa cake" plan though...... :eek:)
    >
    > (hmmmm....tempting, no, must not raid larder so early in the day)
     
  5. Bagbourne

    Bagbourne Guest

    "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Having decided not to invest lots of cash in a disc wheel my attention now turns to supplements.
    >
    > Presently, I just use Isostar as and when along with the odd jaffa cake.
    >
    > I am wondering if using creatine etc. etc. would help improve my time trialling times.

    Have a look at http://www.upllementwatch.com/ certain things are debunked, but there are a lot of
    useful supplements out there.

    Cheers,

    Animal
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 19 Jan 2003 13:37:49 -0000, "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am wondering if using creatine etc. etc. would help improve my time trialling times.

    I know several people at my nearly former gym who have used this stuff
    - they are universally of the opinion that it is a Bad Thing. The rumoured side effects
    (cramping and dehydration) are real, and the risk of kidney damage is probably not worth it.
    You have to work to maintain hydration in cycling anyway, adding something which worsens the
    situation may not be smart.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Having decided not to invest lots of cash in a disc wheel my attention now turns to supplements.
    >
    > Presently, I just use Isostar as and when along with the odd jaffa cake.
    >
    > I am wondering if using creatine etc. etc. would help improve my time trialling times.
    >
    > Does anyone have practical experience of this and if so, I would welcome your recommendations.
    >
    > Thanks, Jim.
    >
    >
    I just go for eating relatively healthily, less processed food, more fruit & veg, plenty of water
    and a good dose of carbohydrates if I'm exercising. As I'm currently exercising most days, I have a
    baked potato for lunch, either with tuna or baked beans and cheddar melted over the top, seems to
    suffice. Water's a miracle !, ensure you drink the recommended amounts. I only drink 'on the go' If
    I'm covering reasonable distances / times,i.e. over a couple of hours, although I know the trend now
    is to take a sip every 500 meters ;-). Drink just before you start and right after you finish,
    shouldn't be any problem. I think supplements are over-rated if you're already making the effort
    with your diet. I've actually heard of adverse reports on people using hi-energy drinks on high risk
    dehydration rides (i.e., hot weather), rather than water. Those using water had no problem. After
    all, if you're using supplements to improve your times, then it isn't a true reflection of your
    capabilities, is it ?

    Cheers, Dave.
     
  8. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Just a word of thanks to all replyees (?), malt loaf here I come...

    "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Having decided not to invest lots of cash in a disc wheel my attention now turns to supplements.
    >
    > Presently, I just use Isostar as and when along with the odd jaffa cake.
    >
    > I am wondering if using creatine etc. etc. would help improve my time trialling times.
    >
    > Does anyone have practical experience of this and if so, I would welcome your recommendations.
    >
    > Thanks, Jim.
     
  9. David Gillbe

    David Gillbe Guest

    If doing a longer ride (or even a shorter one) absolutely nothing in the world beats good old Malt
    loaf :) only 3% fat and loaded with calories, + a fair amount of protein. I once did a 250km day on
    only two malt loaves, and wasn't quite dead by the end :)
     
  10. "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote
    > I just go for eating relatively healthily, less processed food, more fruit & veg, plenty of water
    > and a good dose of carbohydrates if I'm exercising.

    Me too! Although I must admit that when I'm touring and my caloric needs are greatly elevated, I
    can't resist taking advantage of the situation by eating a nice dessert every evening and cakes at
    tea, instead of increasing just the healthy stuff.

    > I think supplements are over-rated if you're already making the effort with your diet. I've
    > actually heard of adverse reports on people using hi-energy drinks on high risk dehydration rides
    > (i.e., hot weather), rather than water. Those using water had no problem.

    I think they key here is "hi-energy" drinks. Normal energy drinks made up to the proper
    concentration actually help with hydration, from the reports I've read. Actually I find that
    drinking them at the recommended concentration makes them too sweet, so I generally use half as much
    as is recommended, and this tastes good and certainly doesn't interfere with hydration.

    -Myra
     
  11. Jim

    Jim Guest

  12. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > David Gillbe wrote:
    >
    >>If doing a longer ride (or even a shorter one) absolutely nothing in the world beats good old Malt
    >>loaf :)
    >
    >
    > Porridge does, but it gets a bit sloppy in the back pocket.

    Make it thicker, you can take a slice with you (a traditional food for workers out in the
    field/hills, I believe).

    James
     
  13. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Tony W wrote:

    >>> If doing a longer ride (or even a shorter one) absolutely nothing in the world beats good old
    >>> Malt loaf :)
    >>
    >> Porridge does, but it gets a bit sloppy in the back pocket.
    >
    > My Nan (bless her) used to make poridge that wouldn't slop around too much. It was 'orrible.

    I like it pretty solid, actually (cooked with water, no milk, pinch of salt). Then honey and a
    splash of cold milk makes it lovely.

    >>> only 3% fat
    >>
    >> I like malt loaf but only with a 5mm thick spreading of butter on it. Yummm.
    >
    > But that is > 3% fat -- or it is if I spread the butter :(

    Exactly. So not so great for cycling then.

    ~PB
     
  14. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Jim <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Just a word of thanks to all replyees (?), malt loaf here I come...

    My two-pence. If you want something that improves your performance, what has worked for me is taking
    care of myself *after* a ride.

    For me, this means not just collapasing on the sofa for 30 mins and then trying to get some food,
    but eating immeadiatly I get in from the ride. I've taken to drinking a pint of "Rego" (which is
    basically a carbo drink with some protien in). Then I go and shower etc before making a proper meal.
    Sometimes I replace the rego with a pike of fruit.

    I found that with the best will in the world, if I got in, showered, streched, changed and then
    cooked it'd be at least an hour after getting in when I started eating and this proved too long.

    I don't use carbo drinks during rides (well, very rarely) since I find them to coat my teeth in a
    manner I find unpleasant. I eat a combination of bananas and Sainburys cereal bars on rides (the
    latter being very like PowerBars etc. but much cheaper)

    Not that there's now something called "Rego Rapid" or "Rego Plus" or some such, which I won't drink
    becuase it's got creatine in it.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  15. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On 22 Jan 2003 10:26:16 GMT, "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >there's now something called "Rego Rapid" or "Rego Plus" or some such, which I won't drink becuase
    >it's got creatine in it.

    And also, surely, because it sounds like a hair loss treatment?

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  16. "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Jim <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : Just a word of thanks to all replyees (?), malt loaf here I come...
    >
    > My two-pence. If you want something that improves your performance, what has worked for me is
    > taking care of myself *after* a ride.
    >
    > For me, this means not just collapasing on the sofa for 30 mins and then trying to get some food,
    > but eating immeadiatly I get in from the ride.

    Runners are advised that muscles are most receptive to glycogen replacement if you eat within 15
    minutes of completing long, hard exercise. After 15 minutes the rate of absorption halves. You're
    recommended to eat high-glycemic foods like bread, bagels and raisins. Malt loaf seems to be an
    ideal combination! High carbohydrate drinks are also acceptable.
     
  17. "Jim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Indeed, just been there, very informative... and it's just saved me £14.99
    > :)

    I hope it supported your original "jaffa cake" plan though...... :eek:)

    (hmmmm....tempting, no, must not raid larder so early in the day)
     
  18. Tony W wrote:
    >
    > "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > David Gillbe wrote:
    > > > If doing a longer ride (or even a shorter one) absolutely nothing in the world beats good old
    > > > Malt loaf :)
    > >
    > > Porridge does, but it gets a bit sloppy in the back pocket.
    >
    > My Nan (bless her) used to make poridge that wouldn't slop around too much. It was 'orrible.

    My parents (who met at Edinburgh Uni in the 50's) heard stories about poor students making
    drawerfuls of porridge then cutting lumps out once it had set. Sounds quite neat...

    --
    Patrick Herring http://www.dcs.shef.ac.uk/cgi-bin/makeperson?P.Herring
     
  19. Graeme Dods

    Graeme Dods Guest

    Patrick Herring <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... <snip>
    > My parents (who met at Edinburgh Uni in the 50's) heard stories about poor students making
    > drawerfuls of porridge then cutting lumps out once it had set. Sounds quite neat...

    Apparently the "porridge drawer" was standard in many kitchens in the past (not just students'). The
    first time I saw one was when we found an old kitchen table in the barn of a house a friend had just
    bought. We opened the drawer in the table and found dried porridge glued to one of the corners.

    Have fun!

    Graeme
     
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