switching from a triple to a double

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by pjhiggins, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. pjhiggins

    pjhiggins New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2005
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I recently was encouraged to cycle more and run less by my orthopedist, so I upgraded my old MTB to a Trek 1500. I switched out the cages and put in clips and upgraded a few other things because if I am as competitive with cycling as I was with running, I will soon want to be racing against people.

    My questions is whether I should switch the triple-chainring that came with the bike to a double? I have ridden with some fairly established riders and racers, and they all seem to be using a double. Right now, I am riding about 100 miles per week, with no intervals or speed training, but I live Northern NJ and we do have our share of hills (believe it or not).

    Any advice would be helpful because this switch is going to be a pricey one.
     
    Tags:


  2. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    4,687
    Likes Received:
    4
    My advice is to keep the triple for now, because there won't be any discernible difference in performance with the double. You may get funny looks from biker snobs, but be sure to give them some back when you blow their wheels off.

    If you really get into road biking and especially racing in the next couple years, then you may want to upgrade to a higher level bike. Get a double chainring setup when/if you make that move.
     
  3. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    Another advantage of staying Triple, close ratio gearing, your bike came with
    Use a 12-23 or 11-21 cassette. Or if you wanted "double" gearing leave the 12-25 and change the 42 for a 39 middle chainring.
     
  4. southwind

    southwind New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    I purchased my first road bike last year and it came with a triple. I've also considerd changing out my triple for a double and have been told by most that it is expensive and there can be some compatibility problems. The conclusion I came to is that in a few years I will purchase another road bike and at that time I will buy one with a double. I haven't used the small ring at all this year and have told myself I won't because it won't make me a stonger rider. One thing I have considered is removing the 3rd ring and keeping everything else the same so at least it looks like a double. I think I would have to have a bike shop change out the front derailuer, but I haven't really researched this option yet.
     
  5. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    All it really takes to change from a double to a triple is a double crank and BB. Triple shifters will shift a double and the triple derailers will work. A cheaper way is ditch the granny ring on the triple crank,and switch the typical 42 middle ring to a generic 39 and stick in a shorter BB.
     
  6. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    4,687
    Likes Received:
    4
    Don't bother. The only negative of a triple is the tiny weight difference from the third chainring. Few people even notice whether it's a triple or double, and even fewer will say anything. How you ride is more important than what you ride, so until that extra weight is holding you back don't worry about it.
     
  7. pjhiggins

    pjhiggins New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2005
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks everyone for your posts and advice. I think that I'll stick with the triple for now, mainly because of the cost factor to upgrade the whole system. As I move along with my riding and training, I'll reassess my needs.

    What is nice is that by ignoring the granny ring, I notice that I'm getting strong very quickly. I've been able to stay with the "A" riders in my club during paceline training over flat ground.

    Quick redirect: where is the best place to start upgrading a bike when I am ready? What can I change out on the 1500 that will yield the biggest results in training and racing times?

    Thanks again.
     
  8. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    1,792
    Likes Received:
    1
    Wheels and tires will yeild your biggest gain speed wise and bang for the buck wise. Upgrading rear derailleurs and shifters will yeild negligible if any results. If it comes to that you're probably better off getting a lightweight frame and building on that.
     
  9. DeanC

    DeanC New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0
    The wheels. Reducing rotating mass is always the first thing to shoot for. Of course, when talking about training, the heavier wheels will make for the harder (and therefore, better?) workout...

    Buying a power meter so you can have more structured training might also be a win.
     
Loading...
Loading...