What tool do I need?



yourmancman

New Member
Mar 5, 2014
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I've just bought a BB30 FSA Adaptor for my Carbon Frame

What's the best tool to install it?
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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A tool for this? http://www.jensonusa.com/!SgFECQd!Dz2x7TQ0Hx4zUw!/FSA-Press-In-Adaptor-For-BB30?utm_source=FRGL&utm_medium=organic&gclid=CMy88oDH_LwCFcx9Ogod5AUAKg

If so, FSA says: "Designed to be installed with a headset cup press"

Park Tool's website shows a headset press used to install the BB30 internal sleeve.

Press the PF30 bearing adaptors into the frame using the HHP-2 or HHP-3 Headset Press.

BB-PF30-bbt30-3-PRESS-SALSAUSE.jpg

HHP-2 Headset Press install the PF30 bearing adaptor into the frame shell


You can contact Park Tool directly and ask them what their recommendation is with regards to your specific frame, adapter and bearing setup. It never hurts to go to the people that make the tools and specific press bushings.

http://www.parktool.com/contact-us
 

oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
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These tools are expensive, so there's no shame in paying a shop to press your bearings in.
 

CAMPYBOB

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Sep 12, 2005
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About $75 for the HHP-3 home model and $150 for the HHP-2 pro model.

I've used mine many times over the years. I;ve also used the $20 el cheapo 'All-Thread' version I bought from Nashbar just because it is way smaller and lighter and actually fits in my travel tool stash. Both have been used in the shop and garage in non-cycling applications.

Between my vises (as opposed to my vices!), arbor presses, hydraulic H-Frame press and my many hand presses and pullers...I am more versatile than Archimedes!

Quality tools are rarely never a poor investment.

Let me see if I can find a link to an el cheapo bearing press.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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'IF' a person is skilled enough, the sleeve can be installed with only a soft face hammer, plastic protective pad and a deep well socket of the appropriate size. It can also be done with a good machinist vise.

Nashbar clone of the Park HHP-2 for $70:



http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_125105_-1___202581
 

CAMPYBOB

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Sep 12, 2005
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Home made press similar to my old Nashbar press: http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-922.html
 

Subliminal-SS

New Member
Sep 4, 2013
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2x M16 Bolts.
Threaded Rod 16mm Wide by about 200mm long

Both of which I have lots of now :( still £25 and I've got about 5 BB tools lol. If only I didn't have to buy in bulk... And had patience in the first place to just use Ebay.

Try not to get bolts with a Rubber Ring to stop slip, just makes it another force to overcome when trying to apply the force evenly to your BB with spanners.
 

swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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If you're going to be cheap - a threaded rod and two nuts are good with thick washers (she loved the washed rod and nuts) would be the cheaper way to go.

... but the right tool is always the one to get the job done. ;)
 

Subliminal-SS

New Member
Sep 4, 2013
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Agreed I Loooooooove new high quality tools.

But £150 for a bearing press when I don't actually have a good bike stand would be a poor investment IMHO. Imagine The Comfortable Bib or Jersey that I can get for that.

Infact my Race Cape was cheaper than the Bearing Press made by Park. and I've used my DIY press once. Twice if you count the first attempt which just used a bolt from diy shop which then led to paranoia it wasn't in straight which then lead to the right size Rod and BB Cups BBT-30.3 but its all good its in now and done much more correctly.

I've used my Winter Jersey for a grand total of just over 100 hours so far this year.

My Bib tights I've worn at least double that maybe triple.

Anything over £30 for me is DIY time anything up to that Ill sink the cash because its more hassle than its worth.

Few Tips for a Homemade Press
  • If you can source Cups to fit into and guide the bearings/Bracket.
  • Get a Bolt that is the exact diameter of the cup Presses so the bolt sits straight
  • DO NOT use any number of washers they will all bend and it will all go to **** if the Rod/Bolt is not Thick enough.
  • Make sure the Bolt is at least the diameter of the cup or at least the bearing. If the Bolt Fits into the bearing hole and you just use a washer or set of washers they are all going to fold unless very thick and strong.
  • Get a Micrometer, best investment for then making educated purchases for the various things needed to get snug diameters.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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Quote by S-SS:
"I Loooooooove new high quality tools."

Your Man Card has just been upgraded to 'Manly Man' level!

All the above posters 'All-Thread' home made press tools meet the requisite level of manliness to earn you free beers if you make it to Ohio.
 

swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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By the time you've found a bolt with a head the size of a bottom bracket and a suitably large spanner, you're in it for a fair amount of cash - unless you want to use the bench vise and rotate your bike around the bench :p Might as well get the correct tool or entrust the job to a trusted shop.
 

Subliminal-SS

New Member
Sep 4, 2013
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That's what the BB cups are for easily sourced from ebay or wherever.

You don't get a Bolt the diameter of the whole hole.
 

swampy1970

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Feb 3, 2008
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If you were pressing it in (and without mashing it to bits) wouldn't you prefer to have a bolt head the size of the thing you're pressing in with a washer underneath it?

I'd rather not assume that the cup I'm pressing in is really well made and devoid of flex and other weird shenanigans.
 

Subliminal-SS

New Member
Sep 4, 2013
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It's not complicated to machine a couple of Cups as long as you are not on a mad crazy angle it's all good It's not a Superhero film where the nuclear timer as tone remove without touching the sides. At the end of the day you squashing a slightly oversized piece if something into something else. Any road the cups I purchased were park tool ones. The very same as the adapters that are used in the big boy tool. That tool is an 16mm diameter as is my rod I got with the bolts from the local screw fix.
 

swampy1970

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Feb 3, 2008
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You say you're in North Wales but I'm guessing from your posts that English isn't your first language.

I just work on the principle that if you're going to press something in, then all of that "something" needs to be covered all the way - that holds true from bottom brackets to my **** in yo' mamma, just joking. ;)
 

Subliminal-SS

New Member
Sep 4, 2013
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Best advice you ever gave applied directly to yourself with that mechanical ineptitude. Always take your bike to a bike shop.
 

swampy1970

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Feb 3, 2008
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The only time any of my bikes/frames have been in a bike shop in the last few decades are: 1. When I've bought them. 2. Had headset and Bb shell faced. Apart from that, I do everything myself. I'd do the facing too - but I can't justify he cost of the rather splendid Campag tools. Buying tools for the car is much more fun.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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Quote by Swampy1970:
"Buying tools for the car is much more fun."

Bikes...motorcycles...cars/trucks...garden tractors...farm tractors...construction...concrete working...fence...ground engaging...electronics/electrical...

Hi. I'm CampyBob and I'm a tool junkie.
 

doss

Member
Apr 26, 2013
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Also freezing it first will shrink it just a bit and allow it to go in easier. Old car mechanics trick Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk