Where are the recipes & cooking tips?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Hopeful Cook, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > You definitely eat them hot. But they would probably
    > > be okay cold, too, in a pinch. I fell in love with
    > > them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    > > That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    > > That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    > > ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    > > great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    > > is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    > > back to PA I learned how to make my own.

    >
    > According to this site, there are 30 of these in California, and 5 in PA:
    >
    > http://www.renfaire.com/Sites/state.html
    >
    > I was always fascinated by the ribs. They were whole ribs, two or three
    > feet long. The one we went to has been closed for some time. I have a
    > costume that my wife made for me.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > [email protected]
    > Petaluma, California, USA


    I think they've multiplied drastically in the 20
    years since I lived there. And the one I went to
    was called "The Renaissance Pleasure Faire" and used
    to be held at a ranch owned by some movie mogul or
    something up north of L. A. I can't remember the
    name of the town now. I think it might have been
    Topanga or something that started with a "t".

    I heard it moved after I left. I think it was near
    Bakersfield for a while (or was it San Bernardino).
    I'm not sure if there were other ones at the time.
    As far as I'm aware it was the only one, at least in
    Southern CA.

    Kate
     


  2. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dan Abel wrote:


    > > According to this site, there are 30 of these in California, and 5 in PA:
    > >
    > > http://www.renfaire.com/Sites/state.html
    > >
    > > I was always fascinated by the ribs. They were whole ribs, two or three
    > > feet long. The one we went to has been closed for some time. I have a
    > > costume that my wife made for me.


    > I think they've multiplied drastically in the 20
    > years since I lived there. And the one I went to
    > was called "The Renaissance Pleasure Faire" and used


    It was probably 30 years ago that I first went, in North California. It
    was an "institution" at the time. I don't know for how long, but
    *everybody* knew about it.


    > As far as I'm aware it was the only one,


    Awareness is often local. That isn't a bad thing.


    > at least in
    > Southern CA.



    I think I've heard of that place. Is it in the US? Should it be?

    :)

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  3. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 12:02:47 -0500, Kate Connally:

    >You definitely eat them hot. But they would probably
    >be okay cold, too, in a pinch. I fell in love with
    >them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    >That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    >That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    >ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    >great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    >is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    >back to PA I learned how to make my own.


    Piroshkis were pretty big in PGH from what I remember. That's
    where I got the taste for them. Can't remember where we bought
    them, or ate them out, but I remember eating them at home at lot.

    -sw
     
  4. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba38 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Kate Connally wrote:
    > I fell in love with
    > > them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.


    > So I take it Ren Faires feel no obligation to serve historically
    > accurate food? I'm kinda surprised, yet I understand how hard that would
    > be...?



    I think they make some attempt to be accurate, but when it comes between
    accurate and lunch, I think that lunch wins.

    I don't know what toilet facilities were like back then. I'm not sure I
    even want to know. I suspect that if they had authentic toilets, that
    they would not only have no repeat customers, but that people would
    leave in droves midway through the faire.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]net
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  5. Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    > On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 12:02:47 -0500, Kate Connally:
    >
    > >You definitely eat them hot. But they would probably
    > >be okay cold, too, in a pinch. I fell in love with
    > >them years ago at the California Renaissance Faire.
    > >That was one of the main reasons I went every year.
    > >That and the half a cantaloupe with a scoop of vanilla
    > >ice cream and raspberry sauce over it. They had
    > >great food there. Sigh. The PA Renaissance Festival
    > >is not nearly as good, food-wise. Anyway, when I moved
    > >back to PA I learned how to make my own.

    >
    > Piroshkis were pretty big in PGH from what I remember. That's
    > where I got the taste for them. Can't remember where we bought
    > them, or ate them out, but I remember eating them at home at lot.
    >
    > -sw


    Hmmm? I've never seen a piroshki in Pittsburgh! Now
    pierogi are another thing altogether. We're swimming in
    them. All the Eastern Orthodox churches make and sell
    them as a fundraiser. In the old days, if you didn't
    make them yourself that was the only place to get them.
    Then came Mrs. T's. Okay, if you're really desperate.
    Nowadays we have them being served at some bars/restaurants
    and there are a number of businesses that sell mainly
    fresh "homemade" pierogi. This is so nice, although
    at tad expensive, about $6.50 a dozen compared to about
    $4.50-$5.50 a dozen from the churches. I hardly ever
    order them in a restaurant as they don't prepare them
    the way I like them. At home I fry them in butter with
    chopped onions or in bacon fat with the diced bacon in
    it and the onions (someone on here got me started doing
    that - it's awesome), but I'm a weirdo in the I eat them
    with a mixture of ketchup and Thai chili sauce.

    Kate
     
  6. Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Dan Abel wrote:

    >
    > > > According to this site, there are 30 of these in California, and 5 in PA:
    > > >
    > > > http://www.renfaire.com/Sites/state.html
    > > >
    > > > I was always fascinated by the ribs. They were whole ribs, two or three
    > > > feet long. The one we went to has been closed for some time. I have a
    > > > costume that my wife made for me.

    >
    > > I think they've multiplied drastically in the 20
    > > years since I lived there. And the one I went to
    > > was called "The Renaissance Pleasure Faire" and used

    >
    > It was probably 30 years ago that I first went, in North California. It
    > was an "institution" at the time. I don't know for how long, but
    > *everybody* knew about it.


    Well, now that I think about it, it may have moved around during the
    year. I seem to remember seeing something like that.

    > > As far as I'm aware it was the only one,

    >
    > Awareness is often local. That isn't a bad thing.


    No, I always did lots of research on that sort of thing.
    I travelled all over the state to attend various events
    that I found interesting. I think I would have heard
    of other renaissance fairs if they were around, but I
    could have missed it or just forgotten since it was
    so long ago. I am getting old and forgetful.

    > > at least in
    > > Southern CA.

    >
    > I think I've heard of that place. Is it in the US? Should it be?
    >
    > :)


    Ha! Ha! Very amusing. I hated the place when I first
    moved there, but grew to love it. Not L. A. so much as
    living within reach of all the natural, and not so natural,
    wonders of So. Cal. - Joshua Tree, Death Valley (okay, not
    so So.), the Date Festival in Indio, the Grand Central
    Market, all the ethnic foods, the list goes on and on.

    Kate
     
  7. On Thu 16 Mar 2006 08:24:13a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Kate
    Connally?

    > Dan Abel wrote:
    >>
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Dan Abel wrote:

    >>
    >> > > According to this site, there are 30 of these in California, and 5
    >> > > in PA:
    >> > >
    >> > > http://www.renfaire.com/Sites/state.html
    >> > >
    >> > > I was always fascinated by the ribs. They were whole ribs, two or
    >> > > three feet long. The one we went to has been closed for some time.
    >> > > I have a costume that my wife made for me.

    >>
    >> > I think they've multiplied drastically in the 20
    >> > years since I lived there. And the one I went to was called "The
    >> > Renaissance Pleasure Faire" and used

    >>
    >> It was probably 30 years ago that I first went, in North California.
    >> It was an "institution" at the time. I don't know for how long, but
    >> *everybody* knew about it.

    >
    > Well, now that I think about it, it may have moved around during the
    > year. I seem to remember seeing something like that.
    >
    >> > As far as I'm aware it was the only one,

    >>
    >> Awareness is often local. That isn't a bad thing.

    >
    > No, I always did lots of research on that sort of thing.
    > I travelled all over the state to attend various events
    > that I found interesting. I think I would have heard
    > of other renaissance fairs if they were around, but I
    > could have missed it or just forgotten since it was
    > so long ago. I am getting old and forgetful.
    >
    >> > at least in
    >> > Southern CA.

    >>
    >> I think I've heard of that place. Is it in the US? Should it be?
    >>
    >> :)

    >
    > Ha! Ha! Very amusing. I hated the place when I first
    > moved there, but grew to love it. Not L. A. so much as
    > living within reach of all the natural, and not so natural,
    > wonders of So. Cal. - Joshua Tree, Death Valley (okay, not
    > so So.), the Date Festival in Indio, the Grand Central
    > Market, all the ethnic foods, the list goes on and on.
    >
    > Kate


    IINM, the Renaissance Festival in AZ is one of the largest, and has been
    here many years:

    http://tinyurl.com/s3qzd

    It doesn't move around. There are permanent grounds for it, complete with
    buildings.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  8. Kate Connally wrote on 16 Mar 2006 in rec.food.cooking

    > At home I fry them in butter with
    > chopped onions or in bacon fat with the diced bacon in
    > it and the onions (someone on here got me started doing
    > that - it's awesome), but I'm a weirdo in the I eat them
    > with a mixture of ketchup and Thai chili sauce.
    >
    > Kate
    >


    I boil mine , eat them swimming in: sour cream, butter, crumbled bacon,
    fried onions with loads of pepper. My kids (when they lived here) liked
    theirs pan fried with the same condiments as I.

    --
    -Alan
     
  9. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dan Abel wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Dan Abel wrote:

    > >
    > > > > According to this site, there are 30 of these in California, and 5 in
    > > > > PA:
    > > > >
    > > > > http://www.renfaire.com/Sites/state.html


    > > It was probably 30 years ago that I first went, in North California. It
    > > was an "institution" at the time. I don't know for how long, but
    > > *everybody* knew about it.

    >
    > Well, now that I think about it, it may have moved around during the
    > year. I seem to remember seeing something like that.


    I remember hearing something about that also. If you checked out the
    back lot, you could see the trailers that some of the staff lived in.


    > > > As far as I'm aware it was the only one,

    > >
    > > Awareness is often local. That isn't a bad thing.

    >
    > No, I always did lots of research on that sort of thing.
    > I travelled all over the state to attend various events
    > that I found interesting. I think I would have heard
    > of other renaissance fairs if they were around, but I
    > could have missed it or just forgotten since it was
    > so long ago. I am getting old and forgetful.



    I've been practicing that myself. Learned it from my father, who is a
    master at forgetting things.


    > > > at least in
    > > > Southern CA.

    > >
    > > I think I've heard of that place. Is it in the US? Should it be?
    > >
    > > :)

    >
    > Ha! Ha! Very amusing. I hated the place when I first
    > moved there, but grew to love it. Not L. A. so much as
    > living within reach of all the natural, and not so natural,
    > wonders of So. Cal. - Joshua Tree, Death Valley (okay, not
    > so So.), the Date Festival in Indio, the Grand Central
    > Market, all the ethnic foods, the list goes on and on.



    And then there is the traffic, the traffic and the traffic.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  10. Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
    >
    > Kate Connally wrote on 16 Mar 2006 in rec.food.cooking
    >
    > > At home I fry them in butter with
    > > chopped onions or in bacon fat with the diced bacon in
    > > it and the onions (someone on here got me started doing
    > > that - it's awesome), but I'm a weirdo in the I eat them
    > > with a mixture of ketchup and Thai chili sauce.
    > >
    > > Kate
    > >



    > I boil mine , eat them swimming in: sour cream, butter, crumbled bacon,
    > fried onions with loads of pepper. My kids (when they lived here) liked
    > theirs pan fried with the same condiments as I.


    Well, yeah, they're boiled first, but then you fry them with
    the butter and onions or bacon and onions. I like the browning
    and crispiness you get when they're fried. I don't care for
    eating them just boiled, no matter what you put on them. And
    as much as I love sour cream, I'm not that crazy about it
    on pierogi. Although, with the bacon I think sour cream would
    work better. Without it it's just too bland. And the only
    pierogi I eat are the potato cheese. I can eat other varieties
    but I'd rather not. The potato cheese are so good I really don't
    want anything else.

    Kate
     
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