Why quit 10 m early?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Amg, Jul 10, 2003.

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  1. Amg

    Amg Guest

    It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his arms (for victory) when he hit the first of three
    "Fiat" logos, well before the white line. After 200 km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it
    simply a matter of perspective?

    Sorry if this is an elementary question -- but where else to get it answered?

    --AMG
     
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  2. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    > that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his
    arms
    > (for victory) when he hit the first of three "Fiat" logos, well before the white line. After 200
    > km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it simply
    a
    > matter of perspective?
    >
    > Sorry if this is an elementary question -- but where else to get it answered?
    >
    > --AMG

    There is no really great reason for it, but these guys start to get really good at knowing when they
    can't possible get passed. Every once in a while they pay for it. Cipo did that early this year and
    got nipped by Oscar Friere, but you would be surprised at how rare it is for those guys to get it
    wrong (by losing the race as a result of premature celebration).
     
  3. "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    > that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his
    arms
    > (for victory) when he hit the first of three "Fiat" logos, well before the white line. After 200
    > km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it simply
    a
    > matter of perspective?
    >
    > Sorry if this is an dumb question -- but where else to get it answered?

    There are no dumb answers, only dumb questions.

    The answer is: why not?
     
  4. Arthg

    Arthg Guest

    There's a great series of photos from the 80's that show G. Saronni in an all smiles victory salute,
    then he sees that a rider is going to pip him, and his arms come down and his facial expression
    changes dramatically.

    "Nick Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    > > that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his
    > arms
    > > (for victory) when he hit the first of three "Fiat" logos, well before
    the
    > > white line. After 200 km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it
    simply
    > a
    > > matter of perspective?
    > >
    > > Sorry if this is an elementary question -- but where else to get it answered?
    > >
    > > --AMG
    >
    > There is no really great reason for it, but these guys start to get really good at knowing when
    > they can't possible get passed. Every once in a while they pay for it. Cipo did that early this
    > year and got nipped by Oscar Friere, but you would be surprised at how rare it is for those guys
    > to get it wrong (by losing the race as a result of premature celebration).
    >
    >

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  5. "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:fMfPa.[email protected]:

    >
    > "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    >> that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his
    > arms
    >> (for victory) when he hit the first of three "Fiat" logos, well before the white line. After 200
    >> km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it simply
    > a
    >> matter of perspective?
    >>
    >> Sorry if this is an dumb question -- but where else to get it answered?
    >
    > There are no dumb answers, only dumb questions.
    >
    > The answer is: why not?

    A picture's worth a thousand words:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos/2003/jun03/suisse/?id=stage4/2

    BTW, thanks for proving there are also dumb answers.

    Your welcome,

    - Boyd S.
     
  6. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Arthg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > There's a great series of photos from the 80's that show G. Saronni in an all smiles victory
    > salute, then he sees that a rider is going to pip him, and his arms come down and his facial
    > expression changes dramatically.

    > "Nick Burns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> > It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear
    >> > today that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his
    >> arms
    >> > (for victory) when he hit the first of three "Fiat" logos, well before
    > the
    >> > white line. After 200 km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it
    > simply
    >> a
    >> > matter of perspective?
    >> >
    >> > Sorry if this is an elementary question -- but where else to get it answered?
    >> >
    >> > --AMG
    >>
    >> There is no really great reason for it, but these guys start to get really good at knowing when
    >> they can't possible get passed. Every once in a while they pay for it. Cipo did that early this
    >> year and got nipped by Oscar Friere, but you would be surprised at how rare it is for those guys
    >> to get it wrong (by losing the race as a result of premature celebration).

    Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...

    >>
    >>

    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  7. Inconnu

    Inconnu Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 17:26:36 +0000, Clovis Lark wrote:

    > Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    >

    The one about how he got screwed by his squad in the 1996 Ronde?
     
  8. Gopher

    Gopher Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 17:11:58 +0200, "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    >that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his arms (for victory) when he hit the first of three
    >"Fiat" logos, well before the white line. After 200 km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it
    >simply a matter of perspective?
    >
    >Sorry if this is an elementary question -- but where else to get it answered?
    >
    >--AMG
    >

    It's 100% ego. Otherwise all sprinters would do the salute AFTER the line.
     
  9. Clovis Lark wrote:
    >
    > Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...

    I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle. I have a picture of that finish on
    my wall and both riders are doing bike throws to the line. Yes, Franco thought he could beat Gilbert
    in a sprint, but he didn't lose the race due to raising his arms too soon.

    If you are talking about a different story, then never mind.

    Mark
     
  10. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Mark Lancaster <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Clovis Lark wrote:
    >>
    >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...

    > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle. I have a picture of that finish
    > on my wall and both riders are doing bike throws to the line. Yes, Franco thought he could beat
    > Gilbert in a sprint, but he didn't lose the race due to raising his arms too soon.

    I thought Ballerini let up and Gilbert stayed down throwing his bike for the pip?

    > If you are talking about a different story, then never mind.

    > Mark
     
  11. Clovis Lark wrote:
    >
    > Mark Lancaster <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Clovis Lark wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    >
    > > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle. I have a picture of that
    > > finish on my wall and both riders are doing bike throws to the line. Yes, Franco thought he
    > > could beat Gilbert in a sprint, but he didn't lose the race due to raising his arms too soon.
    >
    > I thought Ballerini let up and Gilbert stayed down throwing his bike for the pip?
    >

    Nope, see http://www.au4etop.fr/duclos.jpg

    Mark
     
  12. Mark Lancaster wrote:
    >
    >
    > Nope, see http://www.au4etop.fr/duclos.jpg
    >
    > Mark

    here's an old post about the finish
    (http://www.google.com/groups?selm=3ad9054d.124814696%40news.connectnet.com)
    -------------------------------------------------
    Here's an excerpt from cyclingnews.com:

    Reflecting on the 13 times he has taken part in Paris-Roubaix, Bellerini said the worst race was
    1993's, when he was narrowly beaten in the velodrome by Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle. "I was sure he had
    suffered to stay with me, and I didn't ask him to work with me. I didn't feel the need. In the
    velodrome, I was so sure I would win, I wasn't thinking clearly. I forgot that Duclos-Lassalle was a
    track specialist."

    "On the line it was very tight, but I was sure I had won, and the commissaries indicated the victory
    was mine before consulting the photo. Then the victory went to Duclos-Lassalle and I announced I did
    not want to do this job any more, that it was too ungrateful."

    "With hindsight, I realised I did not deserve another win, I had been immodest about this race and
    my competitors."

    That last sentence is a very classy thing for Ballerini to say, especially after he had been so
    bitter about his loss to Duclos-Lassalle.

    I won't be sad if Ballerini wins tommorrow.

    Henry
    ------------------------------------------
     
  13. Because he can....

    Regards! Stephen
     
  14. Inconnu

    Inconnu Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:13:06 -0700, Mark Lancaster wrote:

    > Clovis Lark wrote:
    >>
    >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    >
    > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle.

    Nope, the Ronde, not the Pascale
     
  15. inconnu wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:13:06 -0700, Mark Lancaster wrote:
    >
    > > Clovis Lark wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    > >
    > > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle.
    >
    > Nope, the Ronde, not the Pascale

    But Ballerini never finished second in Flanders.

    Mark
     
  16. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Mark Lancaster <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Clovis Lark wrote:
    >>
    >> Mark Lancaster <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > Clovis Lark wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    >>
    >> > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle. I have a picture of that
    >> > finish on my wall and both riders are doing bike throws to the line. Yes, Franco thought he
    >> > could beat Gilbert in a sprint, but he didn't lose the race due to raising his arms too soon.
    >>
    >> I thought Ballerini let up and Gilbert stayed down throwing his bike for the pip?
    >>

    > Nope, see http://www.au4etop.fr/duclos.jpg

    thnkx for the reference, I'll check it out at work manana when I have faster connection. I guess
    I'll have to change my fantasy of the cagey old gaul winning into another crafty scenario.

    At least Gilbert is the only rider to have soloed every stage of a Tour, finishing first
    each time!!!

    > Mark
     
  17. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, gopher <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 17:11:58 +0200, "AMG" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >It was my assumption that a white line marks the official finish, but it also seemed clear today
    > >that Petacchi stopped pedaling and held up his arms (for victory) when he hit the first of three
    > >"Fiat" logos, well before the white line. After 200 km, why quit 10 m before the end? -- or is it
    > >simply a matter of perspective?
    > >
    > >Sorry if this is an elementary question -- but where else to get it answered?
    > >
    > >--AMG
    > >
    >
    >
    > It's 100% ego. Otherwise all sprinters would do the salute AFTER the line.

    In most of those races you don't want your hands off the bars after the line because you're more
    likely to run into those photogs who are all over the road just after the line.

    You raise your hand(s) when the race is won.

    -WG
     
  18. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    "Mark Lancaster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > inconnu wrote:
    > >
    > > On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:13:06 -0700, Mark Lancaster wrote:
    > >
    > > > Clovis Lark wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    > > >
    > > > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle.
    > >
    > > Nope, the Ronde, not the Pascale
    >
    > But Ballerini never finished second in Flanders.
    >
    > Mark

    Is someone talking about the 1994 Tour of Flanders race where Bugno pipped Museeuw? Was that win
    caused by early celebration on Museeuw's part?
     
  19. Nick Burns wrote:
    >
    > "Mark Lancaster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > inconnu wrote:
    > > >
    > > > On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:13:06 -0700, Mark Lancaster wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Clovis Lark wrote:
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Franco BAllerini could tell you a story...
    > > > >
    > > > > I hope you're not talking about Paris-Roubaix and Duclos Lasalle.
    > > >
    > > > Nope, the Ronde, not the Pascale
    > >
    > > But Ballerini never finished second in Flanders.
    > >
    > > Mark
    >
    > Is someone talking about the 1994 Tour of Flanders race where Bugno pipped Museeuw? Was that win
    > caused by early celebration on Museeuw's part?

    other way around (but bugno still won)
    (http://www.google.com/groups?selm=4c54ef01.0301091429.484308%40posting.google.com)

    1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
    become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple crashes
    and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming encouragement of
    his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw puts his head down
    and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan throws his bike at the
    line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it could get but it was not to
    be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet he always looked behind him
    after that one!

    h
     
  20. heather halvorson wrote:

    > Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet he always looked behind him after that one!

    You'd have thought he would have learned from Amstel Gold the year before.
     
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