'05 Rockhopper - upgrade route?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by weapon, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. weapon

    weapon New Member

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    I just bought an '05 Specialized Rockhopper and while I have some upgrades already planned, I am curious as to how you would approach upgrading this bike. I would like to add disc brakes somewhere along the line but the estimates I have gotten for switching over to discs have thrown me off a bit - if anyone has switched to disc brakes, which components did you use and how much did it cost?

    The stock components are:
    FRAME - A1 Premium Aluminum, double-butted front triangle with ORE DT, frame geometry designed for 100mm front travel, reinforced disc mount, externally machined HT,
    forged alloy drop outs with eyelets and replaceable derailleur hanger
    FORK -Manitou Axle Comp, 100mm travel, damped, 28.6mm black nitride coated stanchions, preload adjust, Cr-Mo steerer
    HEADSET - 1 1/8” threadless, black steel cups, loose ball bearings with seals
    STEM -Alloy Ahead, 15deg.
    HANDLEBARS - Alloy, 38mm rise, 9 degree sweep
    TAPE / GRIPS - Specialized double density Kraton
    FRONT BRAKE - Tektro linear pull
    REAR BRAKE - Tektro linear pull
    BRAKE LEVERS - Shimano Alivio linear pull shifter/brake combo
    FRONT DERAILLEUR - Shimano MC-18 Alivio, 34.9mm clamp, bottom pull
    REAR DERAILLEUR - Shimano M-510 Deore
    SHIFT LEVERS -Shimano Alivio linear pull shifter/brake combo
    CASSETTE -Shimano HG-50, 8-speed, 11x32t
    CHAIN - Shimano IG-31
    CRANKSET -Truvativ 5-D, forged alloy, capless bolts
    CHAINRINGS - 42t Cr-Mo x 32t heat-treated Cr-Mo x 22t heat-treated Cr-Mo, replaceable
    BOTTOM BRACKET - Truvativ, 68x118mm, square taper, sealed cartridge bearing with double crank stops
    PEDALS - Alloy body, alloy cage, toe clips and straps
    RIMS - Alex DH-20, 26”, machined sidewalls, black
    FRONT HUB - Joy-Tech, 32 hole, ground race double sealed loose ball with alloy QR
    REAR HUB -Joy-Tech, freehub, 32 hole, ground race double sealed loose ball with alloy QR
    SPOKES - 2.0mm (14g) stainless steel, brass nipples, L267/R267mm front, L266/R264mm rear
    FRONT TIRE - Specialized Adrenaline 26 x 2.0”, wire bead
    REAR TIRE - Specialized Adrenaline 26 x 2.0”, wire bead
    TUBES - Specialized, schraeder valve
    SADDLE - Specialized Body Geometry Sport MTB
    SEAT POST - Alloy 30.9mmx350/400mm, micro adjust
     
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  2. ireman_1

    ireman_1 New Member

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    If you want to start with brakes you can keep your stock levers and keep the costs down by going with the Avid mechanicals. The operate very well and don't cost much. I've seen them recently for under $100 per wheel. If you don't have disc hubs (?) already then you can factor in +/- 75 per wheel for new inexpensive hubs and the rebuild of the wheels themselves. It doesn't look like the hubs you have are disc (not sure though) so it's possible you could do the switch for under $350 and have some very nice components (Avid mechs, XT disc hubs, DT spokes). If you shop around it's possible to get that down to "near" $300. Check-out Performancebike.com, Cambria, Bulltek sports, ebay, et al and see how cheap you can get away with.

    Since you are upgrading a new bike just be sure not to get too cheap and "cheese" out on some ill-performing parts just to save a buck or two. The bike you have will work fine. I do definately understand the "need" to upgrade and spend the money though! Good luck.

    K.
     
  3. aTmSpectre

    aTmSpectre New Member

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    I have an 05 Rockhopper as well. Before I even rolled it out of the shop I started throwing XT parts on it.

    Are you 100% sure you want disk brakes? They look cool, but seriously, a set of XT or XTR v-brakes really does work just as well and is considerably cheaper.
     
  4. ireman_1

    ireman_1 New Member

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    While it's true that a "properly" set-up/equipped "v-brake" system can perform very well in many conditions I wouldn't go so far as saying they "...work just as well..." in a universal way. That assusmes one has their brakes aligned properly, have pads in good condition and the rims are in good shape (doesn't hurt if they have the ceramic coating as well). In dry "typical" XC riding XT brakes are *absolutely* sufficient. In more "challenging" (extreme?-hate that word) riding or riding which would include water, mud, sand, other debris then the short-comings of the "v-brakes" really become obvious.

    If I lived in a dry location and only did the typical XC riding (no long DH sections) then *maybe* I would live with v-brakes. Neither of those are true for me or many (many, many) other riders so...

    I hear you about the price though. It costs a bit to get in the game. That's why the Avid mechanicals are a good call for those on a budget or don't need an insane brake (most of us don't need "insane" brakes). You can keep the levers/cables from the stock v-brakes and they are cheaper than XTR v-brakes, typically. What I don't get is buying a rockhopper and upgrading it the day you buy it when there are Specialized offerings that are not much more than it and have some of the equipment you are upgrading to (pay retail-or close-for bike, pay near retail on upgrades=(?)more $ than just buying the higher end bike?

    I hope you got a great deal on both bike and bits so you don't waste any $. It doesn't grow on trees around my house anyway! Take care.

    K.
     
  5. weapon

    weapon New Member

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    thanks for the info. I bought mine with the intention of maybe upgrading a little of this and that as I got better on it (more of a road bike enthusiast up to this point) but after test riding the rockhopper, I decided it was such a different experience from the road bike that it would add some serious variety to my usual routine.

    the shifters are causing me a little concern as they are a little clunky - don't get me wrong, they do their job but they seem a little clumbsy about it. hopefully, they will smooth out a little after they are nicely broken in.

    thanks for the heads-up on the avid mechanicals - I'll definitely give them a look. I did the math and figured out why the LBS' disc upgrade estimate had so much of a 3-steps backward price tag - they were figuring in for 2 complete disc-compatible wheels as opposed to just a hub swap out. :confused:

    it rains quite a bit here and the ground here is often nothing more than soaked muck so I am seriously considering discs

    overall, I like the rockhopper a lot -- it just needs some tweakage here and there. that might be more of a case of upgrade fever than anything else but it's always fun to personalize your gear by modding it. :)
     
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