? about replacing cantilever brake pads

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Chris, Apr 6, 2003.

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  1. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Hi Folks

    Could you tell me the procedure for taking out the old brake pads. I have had a look and I cannot
    seem to get proper access to the nut holding the brake pad, on the other side of the nut I have seen
    what might be a Alan key hole am I supposed to use an Alan key to release the brake pad. Or am I
    supposed to loosen other components of the brake system to be able to gain proper access to the
    brake pad nut. Or is this one of things you just take it to a bike shop and say here are the pads
    could you replace the old ones. TIA

    Yours Chris

    --
    To reply add ntlworld.com to my e-mail address
     
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  2. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Folks
    >
    > Could you tell me the procedure for taking out the old brake pads. I have had a look and I cannot
    > seem to get proper access to the nut holding the brake pad, on the other side of the nut I have
    > seen what might be a Alan
    key
    > hole am I supposed to use an Alan key to release the brake pad. Or am I supposed to loosen other
    > components of the brake system to be able to gain proper access to the brake pad nut. Or is this
    > one of things you just
    take
    > it to a bike shop and say here are the pads could you replace the old
    ones.
    > TIA

    Have a shufty at this:

    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/howfix_cant.shtml

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  3. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi Folks
    > >
    > > Could you tell me the procedure for taking out the old brake pads. I
    have
    > > had a look and I cannot seem to get proper access to the nut holding the brake pad, on the other
    > > side of the nut I have seen what might be a Alan
    > key
    > > hole am I supposed to use an Alan key to release the brake pad. Or am I supposed to loosen other
    > > components of the brake system to be able to
    gain
    > > proper access to the brake pad nut. Or is this one of things you just
    > take
    > > it to a bike shop and say here are the pads could you replace the old
    > ones.
    > > TIA
    >
    > Have a shufty at this:
    >
    > http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/howfix_cant.shtml
    >
    >
    > --
    > Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net

    Hi Simon

    Thanks for the pointer, looks like just the site for an amateur like myself.

    Yours Chris
     
  4. > Have a shufty at this:
    >
    A shufty?

    Never seen that before.

    I've heard butcher's, sconce, look obviously. In Ireland also, throw an eye on

    Where's that word from Simon?
     
  5. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Have a shufty at this:
    >>
    > A shufty?
    >
    > Never seen that before.
    >

    You've lived a sheltered life Gary ;-) http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/s.htm

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  6. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Mon, 7 Apr 2003 08:05:15 +0100, "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Have a shufty at this:
    >>>
    >> A shufty?
    >>
    >> Never seen that before.
    >>
    >
    >You've lived a sheltered life Gary ;-) http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/s.htm

    But that doesn't tell us its origins. However <http://www.quinion.com/words/qa/qa-shu1.htm> gives a
    theory. (For those who CBA to click, it is suggested "shufti" was originally an Arabic word that got
    into English from military servicemen stationed in Arabic speaking countries.

    Tim
    --

    fast and gripping, non pompous, glossy and credible.
     
  7. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

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