And now for something completely different.

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by William L. Higl, Mar 30, 2003.

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  1. I live in Everett, Washington. I try to get out and do 10 miles around town at lunch time each day.

    One day I was riding along the waterfront and heard a pretty loud screeching sound followed by an
    6"-10" object falling in the road. My first thought was that some raptor had attacked a seagull and
    what I saw in the road was part of a wing.

    I stopped my bike and looked around and saw a seagull harassing a bald eagle. Since both birds were
    intact my thoughts turned back to the object in the road. I looked at it trying to figure out what
    it was, and then it started flopping around.

    Apparently the eagle had picked up a small flounder in one the tide pools and was flying off to
    enjoy it's lunch when it was attacked by the seagull. I watched both birds jockey for the fish only
    to be run off by passing cars.

    I briefly entertained the idea of saving the fish but figured he had been pierced by eagle talons,
    dropped from about fifty feet in the air, and the best I would be able to do was through it out onto
    the mud flats for some other predator.

    I pointed the aerial battle out to another bystander and we observed the scene for a while.

    I'm just curious about other odd sights some of my fellow cyclists may have seen in their journeys.

    William Higley, Sr. Vision R50
     
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  2. "William L. Higley, Sr." skrev

    > I'm just curious about other odd sights some of my fellow cyclists may have seen in their
    > journeys.

    I saw two small ducks having a pretty good go at drowning a seagull once. It must have been after
    their ducklings. The two ducks went totally berserk and by the time they were finished the seagulls
    plumage had become waterlogged and it was barely able to make it to shore.

    Regards Mikael
     
  3. On our trip around Australia we have often had Kangaroo's and Emu run out onto the road unaware that
    we are there. Kind of makes the riding worthwhile to know we do no damage to their environment.
    Across the Nullarbor we also had plenty of wedge tailed eagles which was also very nice. You sure
    miss a lot when in a car. regards, Andrew & Joanne
    http://www.geocities.com/andrewhooker59/CycleTouring.html

    "William L. Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I live in Everett, Washington. I try to get out and do 10 miles around
    town
    > at lunch time each day.
    >
    > One day I was riding along the waterfront and heard a pretty loud
    screeching
    > sound followed by an 6"-10" object falling in the road. My first thought
    was
    > that some raptor had attacked a seagull and what I saw in the road was
    part
    > of a wing.
    >
    > I stopped my bike and looked around and saw a seagull harassing a bald eagle. Since both birds
    > were intact my thoughts turned back to the object
    in
    > the road. I looked at it trying to figure out what it was, and then it started flopping around.
    >
    > Apparently the eagle had picked up a small flounder in one the tide pools and was flying off to
    > enjoy it's lunch when it was attacked by the
    seagull.
    > I watched both birds jockey for the fish only to be run off by passing
    cars.
    >
    > I briefly entertained the idea of saving the fish but figured he had been pierced by eagle talons,
    > dropped from about fifty feet in the air, and the best I would be able to do was through it out
    > onto the mud flats for some other predator.
    >
    > I pointed the aerial battle out to another bystander and we observed the scene for a while.
    >
    > I'm just curious about other odd sights some of my fellow cyclists may
    have
    > seen in their journeys.
    >
    > William Higley, Sr. Vision R50
     
  4. I live in NJ. One night last summer, I returned to my driveway to see a Swainson's Hawk devouring a
    small rabbit that it had killed on my lawn. The hawk stared at me with evil beady eyes for about
    five minutes, then took off leaving the poor dead rabbit. It must have had a four foot wingspan. I
    checked with some raptor experts and they said that although this hawk is primarily a western bird,
    it could have been passing by looking for a snack.
     
  5. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    "William L. Higley, Sr." wrote:
    > ... I'm just curious about other odd sights some of my fellow cyclists may have seen in their
    > journeys.

    I was riding in eastern Piatt County Illinois (very rural), when I noticed what appeared to be a
    small dog running in the field next to me. The animal accelerated to an estimated 30 mph (~50 kph),
    pulled ahead by about 100 feet (~30 m) and crossed the road in front of me. At that time I was able
    to see it well enough to identify it as a fox (no, not you Ben!).

    On another ride, we passed a group of 6 or 7 turkey vultures sitting on a fence - presumably waiting
    for cyclists to drop. ;)

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  6. Once I was riding along a road atop the Minnesota hills by the Mississippi River. I had been
    admiring the bluebirds that were living in bluebird houses on wooden fenceposts along the road.
    Then I saw a flock of butterflies -- yellowish-green ones, nearly Day-Glo bright in the summer
    sun. I slowed down to look. There were butterflies (or maybe moths, I didn't get close enough to
    look at the antennae) flying in a swarm just off the ground, but there was a huge gaggle of them
    sitting on the dirt. They were gathered around, and facing, something that was about the same
    color as their wings.

    I looked closer, and saw that they were flocking around a mini-pad (feminine hygiene applicance) in
    its bright wrapper that had been dropped along the roadside.

    I wonder what they thought it was....
     
  7. Carol Cohen

    Carol Cohen Guest

    > From: "Jonathan Kaplan" <[email protected]>

    > I live in NJ. One night last summer, I returned to my driveway to see a Swainson's Hawk devouring
    > a small rabbit that it had killed on my lawn. The hawk stared at me with evil beady eyes for about
    > five minutes, then took off leaving the poor dead rabbit. It must have had a four foot wingspan. I
    > checked with some raptor experts and they said that although this hawk is primarily a western
    > bird, it could have been passing by looking for a snack.
    >

    The wildest wildlife I've come across while biking was an extremely large turtle, maybe 18" long and
    12" high, crossing the bike path like the proverbial chicken, only infinitely slower.

    The most impressive wildlife account in a.r.b.r. so far, is Jonathan's because he identified the
    exact variety of raptor. For which he wins the recumbent Audubon award (you can imagine the image on
    the trophy).

    C.C.
     
  8. Carol Cohen

    Carol Cohen Guest

    Hey -- so far these are all rural wildlife. Haven't any riders run into urban wildlife, such as
    driveby shootings, oxycontin robbers running out of drug stores, hookers on streetcorners giving you
    hard-thighed cyclists the eye, road-clogging peace marches, factory arson and car accidents?

    C.C.

    > From: Tom Sherman <[email protected]>

    > I was riding in eastern Piatt County Illinois (very rural), when I noticed what appeared to be a
    > small dog running in the field next to me. The animal accelerated to an estimated 30 mph (~50
    > kph), pulled ahead by about 100 feet (~30 m) and crossed the road in front of me. At that time I
    > was able to see it well enough to identify it as a fox (no, not you Ben!).
    >
    > On another ride, we passed a group of 6 or 7 turkey vultures sitting on a fence - presumably
    > waiting for cyclists to drop. ;)
     
  9. There is a red-tailed hawk that hunts on Mt. Tabor Park here in Portland (that would be urban
    wildlife). Also, on some mornings while riding though the park, I have heard cock pheasants crowing.

    --
    This look left intentionally blank "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BAAC92EC.48E73%[email protected]...
    > Hey -- so far these are all rural wildlife. Haven't any riders run into urban wildlife, such as
    > driveby shootings, oxycontin robbers running out
    of
    > drug stores, hookers on streetcorners giving you hard-thighed cyclists the eye, road-clogging
    > peace marches, factory arson and car accidents?
    >
    > C.C.
    >
    > > From: Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    >
    > > I was riding in eastern Piatt County Illinois (very rural), when I noticed what appeared to be a
    > > small dog running in the field next to me. The animal accelerated to an estimated 30 mph (~50
    > > kph), pulled ahead by about 100 feet (~30 m) and crossed the road in front of me. At that time I
    > > was able to see it well enough to identify it as a fox (no, not you Ben!).
    > >
    > > On another ride, we passed a group of 6 or 7 turkey vultures sitting on a fence - presumably
    > > waiting for cyclists to drop. ;)
     
  10. Ben Fox

    Ben Fox Guest

    Tom, It was definately not me,no way could I overtake and pass you! Ben Fox "Tom Sherman"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "William L. Higley, Sr." wrote:
    > > ... I'm just curious about other odd sights some of my fellow cyclists may
    have
    > > seen in their journeys.
    >
    > I was riding in eastern Piatt County Illinois (very rural), when I noticed what appeared to be a
    > small dog running in the field next to me. The animal accelerated to an estimated 30 mph (~50
    > kph), pulled ahead by about 100 feet (~30 m) and crossed the road in front of me. At that time I
    > was able to see it well enough to identify it as a fox (no, not you Ben!).
    >
    > On another ride, we passed a group of 6 or 7 turkey vultures sitting on a fence - presumably
    > waiting for cyclists to drop. ;)
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  11. Ben Fox

    Ben Fox Guest

    Carol, You need to ride in the "country" more ,the urban areas sound way too dangerous! Ben Fox
    "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BAAC92EC.48E73%[email protected]...
    > Hey -- so far these are all rural wildlife. Haven't any riders run into urban wildlife, such as
    > driveby shootings, oxycontin robbers running out
    of
    > drug stores, hookers on streetcorners giving you hard-thighed cyclists the eye, road-clogging
    > peace marches, factory arson and car accidents?
    >
    > C.C.
    >
    > > From: Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    >
    > > I was riding in eastern Piatt County Illinois (very rural), when I noticed what appeared to be a
    > > small dog running in the field next to me. The animal accelerated to an estimated 30 mph (~50
    > > kph), pulled ahead by about 100 feet (~30 m) and crossed the road in front of me. At that time I
    > > was able to see it well enough to identify it as a fox (no, not you Ben!).
    > >
    > > On another ride, we passed a group of 6 or 7 turkey vultures sitting on a fence - presumably
    > > waiting for cyclists to drop. ;)
     
  12. Harv

    Harv Guest

    C'mon Carol, the hookers give everyone the eye. "Carol Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:BAAC92EC.48E73%[email protected]...
    > Hey -- so far these are all rural wildlife. Haven't any riders run into urban wildlife, such as
    > driveby shootings, oxycontin robbers running out
    of
    > drug stores, hookers on streetcorners giving you hard-thighed cyclists the eye, road-clogging
    > peace marches, factory arson and car accidents?
    >
    > C.C.
    >
    > > From: Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    >
    > > I was riding in eastern Piatt County Illinois (very rural), when I noticed what appeared to be a
    > > small dog running in the field next to me. The animal accelerated to an estimated 30 mph (~50
    > > kph), pulled ahead by about 100 feet (~30 m) and crossed the road in front of me. At that time I
    > > was able to see it well enough to identify it as a fox (no, not you Ben!).
    > >
    > > On another ride, we passed a group of 6 or 7 turkey vultures sitting on a fence - presumably
    > > waiting for cyclists to drop. ;)
     
  13. Carol Cohen wrote:
    >
    > Hey -- so far these are all rural wildlife. Haven't any riders run into urban wildlife, such as
    > driveby shootings, oxycontin robbers running out of drug stores, hookers on streetcorners giving
    > you hard-thighed cyclists the eye, road-clogging peace marches, factory arson and car accidents?
    >

    Years ago when I was in the Navy and stationed at Great Lakes Navy Training Center in Illinois
    (Great Mistakes we called it) I worked late shift and comuted home at midnight through the lesser
    desirable neighborhoods of North Chicago that surrounded the Navy base. I saw plenty of drug
    dealers, street walkers and undefined groups of people hanging out on the corners. I found the most
    inconspicuous method of travel was to coast pass them in the middle of the wide streets with my
    lights off. If they noticed me at all, I was pass them before they could react. Never had any
    problem from any one on foot, a couple times I had a car pass me and then stop, prompting me to make
    a quick U-turn and change of route, but no real problems there either. I felt safer at midnight due
    to the lack of traffic then I did during the afternoon commute in.

    I couple years ago in the much different small town I now live in, I accidentally found myself in
    tail end of the highschool home coming parade. I made a turn and discovered I was behind a hay truck
    full of cheerleaders jumping up and down and waving at me. With my faired Tour Easy pulling a BOB
    trailer, they probably thought I was part of the parade. Interesting experience.

    Lorenzo L. Love http://home.thegrid.net/~lllove

    "We recognize, however dimly, that greater efficiency, ease, and security may come at a substantial
    price in freedom, that law and order can be a doublethink version of oppression, that individual
    liberties surrendered for whatever good reason are freedom lost." Walter Cronkite, in the preface to
    the 1984 edition of 1984
     
  14. Jerry Rhodes

    Jerry Rhodes Guest

    I live in Maverick County, Texas and one evening as I was on my way back from my daily 16 mile loop
    I spotted a big Mexican Rat snake. They look just like Indigo snakes at first glance.

    I stopped to watch it and then noticed that it was facing down a large Rattle snake. It was
    facinating to see the Mexican Rat snake "herd" the rattler towards it's head with movements of it's
    tail. The rattler made a tactical error and decided to go past by way of the end that wasn't moving.
    When the rattler's head passed close to the Mexican Rat snake's head, the rat snake made a lightning
    grab at the Rattle snake and caught it by the head.

    I stuck around for about 45 minutes or until about 25% of the rattler had been swallowed.

    Jerry
     
  15. Pat O'Malley

    Pat O'Malley Guest

    " Here in Texas there are large ugly turkey buzzards that diet on road kill. They are very slow and
    reluctant to stop their feast even when you are bearing down on them in a truck. But they have a
    good sense of timing and always fly off just at the last moment. One fine day I was on a narrow
    country lane descending a long hill at a pretty good clip, and a group of buzzards up ahead were
    pecking at an unidentified furry object. As I got closer to them I yelled for them to get out of my
    way. As usual, they took their time about it, and one of the greedy fellows decided to take his
    portion of the food "to go". In his grips were about 12 inches of slimy entrails, and he was flying
    straight in front of me, and not gaining altitude. I had to brake to keep from rear ending him and
    his nasty meal.
     
  16. David Bogie

    David Bogie Guest

    This is one of the interesting things about riding a recumbent, isn't it? I think we see things
    people on other types of bikes just don't notice. On a tour from Boise ID to Portland OR, the
    recumbents would get into camp a little later than the wedgies. As we talked about the day's ride
    over drinks and dinner, it became clear that, while we seemed to be on the same roads, we were
    riding a different route.

    I watched an English sheepdog run her puppies through basic training, chasing a bunch of penned
    lambs. A pair of hawks courting in strong thermals. One hundred and thirteen dead quadripeds, none
    of which were once cats or dogs. Two trees containing more than seventy-five pairs of sneakers.
    Dozens of improperly displayed American flags. Billions of empty plastic bottls and aluminum cans
    and just as many blue Walmart bags.

    david boise ID

    "William L. Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I live in Everett, Washington. I try to get out and do 10 miles around town at lunch time each
    > day. One day I was riding along the waterfront and heard a pretty loud screeching sound followed
    > by an 6"-10" object falling in the road. My first thought was that some raptor had attacked a
    > seagull and what I saw in the road was part of a wing. I'm just curious about other odd sights
    > some of my fellow cyclists may have seen in their journeys. William Higley, Sr. Vision R50
     
  17. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    Carol Cohen <[email protected]> wrote in news:BAAC90B2.48E43%[email protected]:

    >> From: "Jonathan Kaplan" <[email protected]>
    >
    >> I live in NJ. One night last summer, I returned to my driveway to see a Swainson's Hawk devouring
    >> a small rabbit that it had killed on my lawn. The hawk stared at me with evil beady eyes for
    >> about five minutes, then took off leaving the poor dead rabbit. It must have had a four foot
    >> wingspan. I checked with some raptor experts and they said that although this hawk is primarily a
    >> western bird, it could have been passing by looking for a snack.
    >>

    On one early fall ride, I observed a wild turkey standing near the road. On another ride in the
    same area, mid-afternoon, a coyote ran across the road in front of me. Seeing a coyote in this
    area is uncommon. One of my favorite routes involves a road thru the only "canyon" in the area. In
    a shaded section of road ahead, there was an object. As I got closer I realized it was someones'
    shoe. A left. I rode on making several turns down backroads and about 5 miles later, I rode past
    the matching right shoe!

    rorschandt
     
  18. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    rorschandt wrote:
    >
    > On one early fall ride, I observed a wild turkey standing near the road....

    I was on an invitational ride with two other members of my cycling club. It was cool and had started
    raining consistently. A wild turkey ran across the road in front of us, and I called out, "turkey
    up" to which one of the other riders' replied, "four turkeys".

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  19. piks11

    piks11 Guest

    The way things are going here I thought the story was some kind of political analogy at first.
     
  20. "William L. Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... <snip>
    >
    > I'm just curious about other odd sights some of my fellow cyclists may have seen in their
    > journeys.
    >
    > William Higley, Sr. Vision R50

    I've come to the conclusion that we men are ducks.

    My wife and I on our Longbikes Tandem and our neighbors on their Burley Tandem took a ride out to
    one of our neighborhood lakes a few Sundays ago. When we got to the lake, we grabbed a seat on a
    park bench and relaxed. The lake had quite a few ducks swimming around and a few started heading
    towards us. No big deal. Probably looking for something to eat.

    Well this group of ducks came to shore about 10 feet to our left and flew right up the beach, around
    our backs and right under our bench. At first, I thought we were being attacked.

    I stood up and looked down and just to the side of our bench was a poor female duck pinned to the
    ground by a big male duck with about 6 or 7 other ducks fighting for position. Well the male duck
    mounted the female duck and the other ducks kept trying to mount the male duck and the frenzy was
    on. By this time, I'm laughing histerically and my wifes telling me I'm a jerk.

    After about a minute the male duck must have finished his business because he falls off the female
    duck and just lays there (Asleep?). I mean he just plops on the ground and doesn't move. Does the
    female duck get to rest. Hell no. She waddles quickly back into the water and swims for her life
    while the other male ducks clamber after her. How she kept from drowning, I do not know.

    Well, we're all laughing and the women are calling us names and I look down to see if the first male
    duck is still there. Nope. He's back in the water swimming very slowly in the opposite direction
    just strutting his stuff and waging his tail from side to side (Probably off to tell his friends
    about the fun he had). The icing on the cake was when he stretched his wings and stuck his neck way
    high as if to say "Yep, I'm the duck. I'm the stud. Here me quack"

    And all I have to say is deep down, we men are ducks.

    Bill Meacham
     
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