Campy Delta brakes instructions wanted

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Darryl Mataya, Feb 7, 2003.

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  1. I'm looking for Delta brakes instruction sheet (late model). All these years of looking for NOS
    brakes paid off, but I've never actually installed a pair. If you have an actual booklet, I'm
    willing to purchase, but a photocopy or other resource would be helpful too. Yes, I'm sure I could
    figure it out, but I always collect the written materials if possible. -Darryl Mataya
     
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  2. I C S

    I C S Guest

    "Darryl Mataya" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | I'm looking for Delta brakes instruction sheet (late model). All these years of looking for NOS
    | brakes paid off, but I've never actually installed a pair. If you have an actual booklet, I'm
    | willing to purchase, but a photocopy or other resource would be helpful too. Yes, I'm sure I could
    | figure it out, but I always collect the written materials if possible. -Darryl Mataya
    |

    Not the actual instuctions... but maybe helpful: http://www.campyonly.com/roadtests/delta.html
     
  3. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Darryl Mataya writes:

    > I'm looking for Delta brakes instruction sheet (late model). All these years of looking for NOS
    > brakes paid off, but I've never actually installed a pair. If you have an actual booklet, I'm
    > willing to purchase, but a photocopy or other resource would be helpful too. Yes, I'm sure I could
    > figure it out, but I always collect the written materials if possible.

    I'm not sure what it is you want to find in an instruction sheet. Just take the brake apart, clean
    and grease the mechanism. There isn't much to it but the parts are small as you can see from the
    pictures at:

    http://www.campyonly.com/roadtests/delta.html

    You might also fine interesting the discourse that went on here a few years ago:

    http://yarchive.net/bike/brake_leverage.html http://yarchive.net/car/porsche_vw_beetle.html

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  4. [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Darryl Mataya writes:
    >
    > > I'm looking for Delta brakes instruction sheet (late model). All these years of looking for NOS
    > > brakes paid off, but I've never actually installed a pair. If you have an actual booklet, I'm
    > > willing to purchase, but a photocopy or other resource would be helpful too. Yes, I'm sure I
    > > could figure it out, but I always collect the written materials if possible.
    >
    > I'm not sure what it is you want to find in an instruction sheet. Just take the brake apart, clean
    > and grease the mechanism. There isn't much to it but the parts are small as you can see from the
    > pictures at:
    >
    > http://www.campyonly.com/roadtests/delta.html
    >
    > You might also fine interesting the discourse that went on here a few years ago:
    >
    > http://yarchive.net/bike/brake_leverage.html http://yarchive.net/car/porsche_vw_beetle.html
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA

    Jobst,

    Thank you for the links. I had read some of those Delta discussions at the time. The VW/Porsche
    thread is very useful (and I'm not done reading yet). This is precisely why I also like to collect
    written material that accompanies notorious technology. My Delta's will be mounted for display on a
    bike with contemporary relics of the C-Record era (high-flange hubs, semi-aero rims, "aero" seat
    post). In another 10 years it will be quite instructive for any student of design, technology,
    and/or equipment marketing to study this machine and determine what the goals and affects were. I
    think it will look beautiful and silly at the same time. But then again I think a bicycle frame made
    from titanium merged with carbon looks particularly silly today.

    -Darryl Mataya
     
  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Darryl Mataya <[email protected]> writes:

    >> http://yarchive.net/bike/brake_leverage.html http://yarchive.net/car/porsche_vw_beetle.html

    > Thank you for the links. I had read some of those Delta discussions at the time. The VW/Porsche
    > thread is very useful (and I'm not done reading yet). This is precisely why I also like to collect
    > written material that accompanies notorious technology. My Delta's will be mounted for display on
    > a bike with contemporary relics of the C-Record era (high-flange hubs, semi-aero rims, "aero" seat
    > post). In another 10 years it will be quite instructive for any student of design, technology,
    > and/or equipment marketing to study this machine and determine what the goals and affects were. I
    > think it will look beautiful and silly at the same time. But then again I think a bicycle frame
    > made from titanium merged with carbon looks particularly silly today.

    I made an effort to get a pair of Modolo Chronos I found a couple on eBay but they went way over
    $100 so I bailed out. I have a set of the last Campagnolo Delta brakes that I rescued before a
    bicycle shop trashed them. These are great collectors items and I think your effort to equip a
    period bicycle with a full C-Record group appropriate. My brakes will go to a similar project with a
    friend who has many old steel frames from the 1950-1970's, mostly Italians.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  6. [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I made an effort to get a pair of Modolo Chronos I found a couple on eBay but they went way over
    > $100 so I bailed out. I have a set of the last Campagnolo Delta brakes that I rescued before a
    > bicycle shop trashed them. These are great collectors items and I think your effort to equip a
    > period bicycle with a full C-Record group appropriate. My brakes will go to a similar project with
    > a friend who has many old steel frames from the 1950-1970's, mostly Italians.
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA

    Ahh, my favorite era, where the roots of the bike marketing spiral took hold. A favorite part of
    collecting is showing and explaining these machines to younger people, or anyone only familiar with
    current bike technology. The 20-something folks in our club are always surprised to discover that a
    25 year-old steel bike with Campy super record weighs the same as their $3,000 machine. And while
    their certainly have been improvements in execution people naturally assume a later model is an
    advance. (I hold that all technology marketing contains the assumption that tradeoffs don't exist,
    but that we are following a natural forward progression.) -Darryl
     
  7. I've been using Croce d'Aune *Delta's* for 10+ years now. I've tried the record brakes, which work
    about the same but IMHO are harder to maintain. The Croce springs are more accessible. The scissor
    mechanism is the same.

    You may need to hunt around for the special allen key, engraved Campagnolo, that fits the cable
    screw. It's a very peculiar size.

    I dunno about brake pads, because I've never needed to replace them. They are of very stout,
    resilient material (which is why they slow you down but never lock the wheels) and just seem to last
    forever (20K miles?).

    One more weird note. I was in a bike shop in L.A. that had carbon fibre cover/flanges that fit
    over the brakes. Not exactly sure what the purpose was but they looked very cool. Gilding the
    lilly, so to speak.

    --Adam
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "chickenfriedjeezus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been using Croce d'Aune *Delta's* for 10+ years now. I've tried the record brakes, which work
    > about the same but IMHO are harder to maintain. The Croce springs are more accessible. The scissor
    > mechanism is the same.
    >
    > You may need to hunt around for the special allen key, engraved Campagnolo, that fits the cable
    > screw. It's a very peculiar size.
    >
    > I dunno about brake pads, because I've never needed to replace them. They are of very stout,
    > resilient material (which is why they slow you down but never lock the wheels) and just seem to
    > last forever (20K miles?).
    >
    > One more weird note. I was in a bike shop in L.A. that had carbon fibre cover/flanges that fit
    > over the brakes. Not exactly sure what the purpose was but they looked very cool. Gilding the
    > lilly, so to speak.

    The allen key is 3.5mm. Not all that weird.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
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