Davis, CA

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bcmuse, Apr 29, 2003.

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  1. Bcmuse

    Bcmuse Guest

    I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall, meaning I'm trading in my
    air-polluting automobile for a lot more action on my road bike as my primary source of
    transportation.

    Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?

    Some friends have told me to be careful because bikes got stolen and it rains alot, so no exposed
    wedges or frame pumps then and probably a rack and some fenders?

    I also currently lock with a generic krypto-lock and a cable lock. Should I upgrade?
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (BcMuse) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > Some friends have told me to be careful because bikes got stolen and it rains alot, so no exposed
    > wedges or frame pumps then and probably a rack and some fenders?

    Davis is a college town and does experience some petty theft. Bring a backpack. Central California
    gets some rain during the winter, but you probably won't get much between May 1 and Thanksgiving.
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (BcMuse) writes:

    > I also currently lock with a generic krypto-lock and a cable lock. Should I
    ^^^^^^^^
    > upgrade?
    ^^^^^^^^

    To what? There's only so far we can go with [quality of] locks. Then, we've gotta worry about the
    quality of whatever we're locking /to/. After that, we have to fill in the blanks with savvy and
    anti-guile.

    Keep your ride in your sight as much as possible. Bring it indoors with you whenever you can, and
    when you can quickly reach it with a flying tackle lest anyone dare touch it. Parking meters are
    good to lock to, so long as their stems aren't too fat to get a U-lock around, or they have those
    rings to lock to. Signs stuck into a collar in the concrete, with an accessible, loosenable
    retaining screw in the collar to hold the sign in, are bad things to lock to. So are kick-off-able
    wood fence pickets. Park it where there's the most foot traffic, and visibility for passing cops who
    might see the glint of a hacksaw in the sunlight. If there are any street ppl who regularly hang
    around where you regularly park, maybe get to know them, and regularly slip them a wee stipend to
    keep an eye on your bike.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (BcMuse) writes:
    >
    > > I also currently lock with a generic krypto-lock and a cable lock.
    Should I
    >
    ^^^^^^^^
    > > upgrade?
    > ^^^^^^^^
    >
    > To what? There's only so far we can go with [quality of] locks. Then, we've gotta worry about the
    > quality of whatever we're locking /to/. After that, we have to fill in the blanks with savvy and
    > anti-guile.

    My general rule of thumb is to try to put my bike next to more expensive bikes that are less
    securely locked.
     
  5. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> writes:

    > My general rule of thumb is to try to put my bike next to more expensive bikes that are less
    > securely locked.

    That's one tactic, and often a good one (except for the people who get ripped-off).

    I figure, when things /really/ go wrong, it's when a bunch of bad things happen simultaneously. And
    when things go right, it's when a *bunch* of good things happen simultaneously. So, I've come to
    believe in helping as much good stuff to happen as possible. Or at least, not hindering it.

    When things go right, it's usually mere, random happenstance. But when they go wrong, it's with
    split-second precision :)

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  6. On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 03:22:11 +0000, BcMuse wrote:

    > I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall, meaning I'm trading in my
    > air-polluting automobile for a lot more action on my road bike as my primary source of
    > transportation.
    >
    > Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?
    >
    Supposed to be a very bike-friendly area.

    > Some friends have told me to be careful because bikes got stolen

    Yeah? Those of us living in big cities really feel for you. Bikes get stolen eveywhere. Any lock can
    be gotten around, given time. Keep your bike with you when you can, and lock it in plain sight when
    you have to. Locking it in an alley is just as bad as leaving it unlocked.

    There used to be a maxim that all bikes in the city weighed 40 pounds. A 20-pound bike needs a
    20-pound lock, a 30-pound bike needs a 10-pound lock. A 40-pound bike needs no lock.

    > and it rains alot, so no exposed wedges or frame pumps then and probably a rack and some fenders?

    Rains a lot? In the Central Valley?  You will see absolutely 0 rain from Memorial Day to Labor Day.
    It will occsaionally rain in the rest of the year, but annual rainfall is maybe 15 inches. There is
    a reason all that grassland is brown.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
    knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not
    charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  7. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Bring an old clunker bike that is functional for riding around campus. Save your good bike for real
    cycling. There are more than a few bicycle vs. bicycle accidents each year. It rains more in Davis
    than in L.A.

    BcMuse wrote:

    > I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall, meaning I'm trading in my
    > air-polluting automobile for a lot more action on my road bike as my primary source of
    > transportation.
    >
    > Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?
    >
    > Some friends have told me to be careful because bikes got stolen and it rains alot, so no exposed
    > wedges or frame pumps then and probably a rack and some fenders?
    >
    > I also currently lock with a generic krypto-lock and a cable lock. Should I upgrade?
     
  8. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    "David L. Johnson" wrote:

    > Rains a lot? In the Central Valley?  You will see absolutely 0 rain from Memorial Day to Labor
    > Day. It will occsaionally rain in the rest of the year, but annual rainfall is maybe 15 inches.

    Those 15" typically fall in a few short weeks, so winter quarter can be very wet. The clouds that
    drop 500" of snow on the Sierra crest pass over Davis, dropping rain.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  9. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

    =v= It's pretty flat there, so if you're worried about theft, you might want to consider a cheap
    beater bike. <_Jym_
     
  10. Gary German

    Gary German Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (BcMuse) writes:
    >
    > > I also currently lock with a generic krypto-lock and a cable lock.
    Should I
    >
    ^^^^^^^^
    > > upgrade?
    > ^^^^^^^^
    >
    > To what? There's only so far we can go with [quality of] locks. Then, we've gotta worry about the
    > quality of whatever we're locking /to/. After that, we have to fill in the blanks with savvy and
    > anti-guile.
    >
    > Keep your ride in your sight as much as possible. Bring it indoors with you whenever you can, and
    > when you can quickly reach it with a flying tackle lest anyone dare touch it. Parking meters are
    > good to lock to, so long as their stems aren't too fat to get a U-lock around, or they have those
    > rings to lock to. Signs stuck into a collar in the concrete, with an accessible, loosenable
    > retaining screw in the collar to hold the sign in, are bad things to lock to. So are kick-off-able
    > wood fence pickets. Park it where there's the most foot traffic, and visibility for passing cops
    > who might see the glint of a hacksaw in the sunlight. If there are any street ppl who regularly
    > hang around where you regularly park, maybe get to know them, and regularly slip them a wee
    > stipend to keep an eye on your bike.
    >
    >
    > cheers, Tom
    >
    > --
    > -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    > [point] bc [point] ca

    If you follow this advice, you'll get a ticket at Davis. There are a million bikes on campus (my
    daughter goes there)...fortunately, there are also a million bike racks. Sometimes it's hard finding
    one open, but locking it to something like a tree or a parking sign will get you cited for sure
    (and, if your bike isn't registered with the city, they'll impound it).

    Most theft takes place off-campus. Best advice is to bring it into your apartment, if possible.

    BTW - Davis is a great place to ride...reasonably flat in town, with challenging hills to the west,
    and lots and lots of bikes.

    GG
     
  11. Tim Smith

    Tim Smith Guest

    Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] (BcMuse) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >> Some friends have told me to be careful because bikes got stolen and it rains alot, so no exposed
    >> wedges or frame pumps then and probably a rack and some fenders?
    >
    >Davis is a college town and does experience some petty theft. Bring a backpack. Central California
    >gets some rain during the winter, but you probably won't get much between May 1 and Thanksgiving.

    Generally true. This year might be an exception.

    I lived in Davis for two years. Very hot in the summer (>100 F many days), but it cools down at
    night, unlike the midwest or the south/southwest. Winters are rainy and chilly, but with the right
    gear you can ride year-round.

    Any bike left unlocked will get stolen in Davis. I had a truly trashy 5-speed (derailleur!) bike
    that wasn't locked stolen after one night left unlocked. This was a bike that wouldn't have brought
    $5 at a garage sale.
     
  12. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Maybe OT, but I have a friend who moved from Maine to Davis, CA and his welcome was a ticket for
    riding through a stop sign. Lets not argue about obeying traffic signs, etc... but just appreciate
    moving from Maine to CA and in the first week getting a ticket on your BIKE!

    "BcMuse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall,
    meaning I'm
    > trading in my air-polluting automobile for a lot more action on my road
    bike as
    > my primary source of transportation.
    >
    > Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?
    >
    > Some friends have told me to be careful because bikes got stolen and it
    rains
    > alot, so no exposed wedges or frame pumps then and probably a rack and
    some
    > fenders?
    >
    > I also currently lock with a generic krypto-lock and a cable lock. Should
    I
    > upgrade?
     
  13. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    [email protected] (BcMuse) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall
    >
    > Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?

    Davis is a really neat town. You'll love it there and will want to try and find work there after you
    get out of school.

    Since it's a college town petty theft is pretty endemic. Put all of your stuff in a backpack and
    take it with you. Do not use a good bike for transportation especially around the campus. You can
    ask the campus cops when they hold the yearly auction and pick up a junker for commuting between
    classes. Use a Krytonite lock at all times and be sure that whatever you lock to can't be moved
    easily. As someone else suggested, lock your bike up near better bikes with cheaper locks.

    The Davis bike clubs (I think there are two of them, a town club and the college club) have some
    really great members with lots of experience and knowledge of all the best routes. The riding around
    that area is fantastic with routes that go all the way to Nevada City if you know how. There is just
    about any kind of riding you want from dead flat to damned steep and long. And you can enter the
    Dunlop TT next spring.

    Rain is not a problem since it rains so seldom as a rule that you look forward to it in order to
    have some time off of the bike. It rains more in the SF bay area and last year I put in 3,000 (dry)
    miles in the first four months and it was a wet year. It isn't LA basin, but that's good.
     
  14. [email protected] (BcMuse) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall, meaning I'm trading in my
    > air-polluting automobile for a lot more action on my road bike as my primary source of
    > transportation.
    >
    > Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?
    >
    I have only limited experience, having gone to Davis for a few brevets. But from my observation
    Davis, CA is the most bicycle friendly town I have ever seen. There are intersections in town where
    a special walk button exist in the bike lane for cyclists. San Diego (my home) is a decent place to
    ride but the city of Davis seems built for cyclists.

    Tom
     
  15. Ralph Bean

    Ralph Bean Guest

    The Davis Police are extremely strict at enforcing automobile driving laws and also at enforcing the
    DMV laws that apply to bicycles. It is common for bicyclists to get cited, especially for cruising
    through stop signs.

    Ralph

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Maybe OT, but I have a friend who moved from Maine to Davis, CA and his welcome was a ticket for
    > riding through a stop sign. Lets not argue about obeying traffic signs, etc... but just appreciate
    > moving from Maine to CA and in the first week getting a ticket on your BIKE!
     
  16. Ralph Bean

    Ralph Bean Guest

    True. And any good quality wheel left unlocked is subject to being stolen from the bicycle.
    Bicycling-related theft is extremely active in Davis.

    Ralph

    "Tim Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Any bike left unlocked will get stolen in Davis.
     
  17. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Ralph Bean writes:

    > The Davis Police are extremely strict at enforcing automobile driving laws and also at enforcing
    > the DMV laws that apply to bicycles. It is common for bicyclists to get cited, especially for
    > cruising through stop signs.

    Oh what a difference. Just down the way at Stanford, (Can't we all just get along) the campus is
    patrolled by the Stanford section of the Sheriff's department and bicyclists are cited at stop signs
    only when ignoring the right of way of a car. There are no traffic lights on the campus except on
    Palm Drive, the main arterial. Besides, you've got to be pretty rude to run into pedestrian in a
    cross walk.

    The attitude is that the campus is for academics and not for cars. The whole place is laid out to be
    auto unfriendly. It's a pleasure to ride bicycle there.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]org Palo Alto CA
     
  18. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Ralph Bean" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > True. And any good quality wheel left unlocked is subject
    to being stolen
    > from the bicycle. Bicycling-related theft is extremely active in Davis.

    The sick thing about this is, UC students are generally middle-class or higher, and if they're not
    already they will be. IOW, they don't need to be ripping off bikes and bike parts. The same thing
    happens at UC Irvine, and USC, where tuition is over $20k a year. This doesn't reflect well on the
    ethics of today's college students.

    Matt O.
     
  19. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Tom Kunich wrote:

    > [email protected] (BcMuse) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I'm moving up to Davis, CA from Los Angeles for school in the fall
    > >
    > > Anyone ever live in Davis or know what to expect?
    >
    > Davis is a really neat town. You'll love it there and will want to try and find work there after
    > you get out of school.
    >
    > Since it's a college town petty theft is pretty endemic. Put all of your stuff in a backpack and
    > take it with you. Do not use a good bike for transportation especially around the campus. You can
    > ask the campus cops when they hold the yearly auction and pick up a junker for commuting between
    > classes. Use a Krytonite lock at all times and be sure that whatever you lock to can't be moved
    > easily. As someone else suggested, lock your bike up near better bikes with cheaper locks.
    >
    > The Davis bike clubs (I think there are two of them, a town club and the college club) have some
    > really great members with lots of experience and knowledge of all the best routes. The riding
    > around that area is fantastic with routes that go all the way to Nevada City if you know how.
    > There is just about any kind of riding you want from dead flat to damned steep and long. And you
    > can enter the Dunlop TT next spring.
    >
    > Rain is not a problem since it rains so seldom as a rule that you look forward to it in order to
    > have some time off of the bike. It rains more in the SF bay area and last year I put in 3,000
    > (dry) miles in the first four months and it was a wet year. It isn't LA basin, but that's good.

    Hasn't Davis been voted one of the most bicycle friendly towns in the US? I'm sure they included
    bycycle clearance on "normal" city streets when the town plan was designed. No, it was just people,
    not a miracle. You can check this site by Paul Dorn. He is a commuting cycling actionist, who lives
    or used to live in Davis. http://runmuki.com/paul/writing/davis.html He is a good writer, i.e. a
    good read. I've been to Davis a few times in the past 20 years, and it always looked like a
    beautiful place to ride. Been to Lost Angeles too, can't say the same. Best regards, Bernie ( a
    Californiaphile from Canada)
     
  20. On Fri, 02 May 2003 21:26:27 +0000, Ralph Bean wrote:

    > The Davis Police are extremely strict at enforcing automobile driving laws and also at enforcing
    > the DMV laws that apply to bicycles. It is common for bicyclists to get cited, especially for
    > cruising through stop signs.

    Gee, ain't that a sin. Actually, this is a good practice. I was downtown (Philly) a couple days ago
    and was embarassed at the cyclists who blew through stoplights. Not only is it stupid-dangerous, but
    it cements in the minds of drivers that cyclists are not real traffic, since they don't think of
    themselves as such.

    This has somewhat less relevance in Philadelphia, though, since a lot of drivers also ignore lights,
    and of course stop signs are for tourists only.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | I don't believe you, you've got the whole damn thing all wrong. _`\(,_ | He's not the kind
    you have to wind-up on Sundays. --Ian (_)/ (_) | Anderson
     
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