Dishing without a dish tool

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rich, Jun 20, 2003.

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  1. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop and
    realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    couldn't trust it's center mark.

    The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel over
    and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until a flip
    fit perfectly back between the feelers.

    Does that make sense? It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a shop
    later to check it.

    Is there a better shade tree method.
     
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  2. Tw406

    Tw406 Guest

    Flip the wheel back and forth in the stand as you bring it up to true.

    <<Dishing without a dish tool

    Is there a way to do that?
     
  3. A good "home brew method" : place a couple of tall glasses of the same height on a dinner table,
    place the rim on the glasses, measure from the table to the axle lock nut, use anything ( books work
    ) as the measuring gage, flip wheel and measure again. This method is very accurate. Speedy

    Rich wrote:

    > Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    > and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    > couldn't trust it's center mark.
    >
    > The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel
    > over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until a
    > flip fit perfectly back between the feelers.
    >
    > Does that make sense? It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a shop
    > later to check it.
    >
    > Is there a better shade tree method.

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  4. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Rich <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >couldn't trust it's center mark.
    >
    >The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel
    >over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until a
    >flip fit perfectly back between the feelers.
    >
    >Does that make sense? It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a shop
    >later to check it.
    >
    >Is there a better shade tree method.

    Lay the wheel on the floor without the skewer or tire, with one side of the rim touching the wall.
    Mark where the rim touches the wall. Flip it over in exactly the same place and compare where the
    rim touches to the mark you made. Half the difference is the dishing error.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Rich" wrote:

    > The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel
    > over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until a
    > flip fit perfectly back between the feelers.

    When flipping the wheel results in no difference, you've got it right. Leave the tall glasses in the
    cupboard. ;->

    Art Harris
     
  6. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 15:28:14 +0000, Mark Hickey wrote:

    > Rich <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >>and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >>couldn't trust it's center mark.
    >>
    >>The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel
    >>over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until a
    >>flip fit perfectly back between the feelers.

    That wouldn't work for me, since my truing stand is not that predictable. I personally don't like
    the idea of using even a good truing stand to set the dish.

    I made my own dishing tool. It is simple to do. Get a piece of angle iron, or aluminum stock --
    basically anything straight and easy to work. It has to be longer than the diameter of a wheel.
    Drill holes in either end spaced even with the flats of a rim. Drill a hole in the middle.

    Attach carriage bolts about 2.5" long or so by passing them through the holes on the ends and
    tightening a nut to hold them. You can be fancier and actually thread the holes if you have a tap. I
    use a flat-head bolt on the center hole, headed the other way and held with a pair of wing-nuts.
    Adjust the center bolt so that the top of the head just touches the locknut on one side of the hub,
    with the ends of the other two bolts on the rim. Don't measure against the end of the axle, since it
    may not be centered with respect to the locknuts. Flip wheel over and compare.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | I don't believe you, you've got the whole damn thing all wrong. _`\(,_ | He's not the kind
    you have to wind-up on Sundays. --Ian (_)/ (_) | Anderson
     
  7. Rich

    Rich Guest

    S. Delaire "Rotatorrecumbent" wrote:

    > A good "home brew method" : place a couple of tall glasses of the same height on a dinner table,
    > place the rim on the glasses, measure from the table to the axle lock nut, use anything ( books
    > work ) as the measuring gage, flip wheel and measure again. This method is very accurate. Speedy

    I assume that the glasses should be weighed down with beer to prevent shifting?
     
  8. Rich <[email protected]> writes:

    >Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >couldn't trust it's center mark.

    Well, brings back thoughts of when I was in high school: center your centerpull brakes, and then
    tighten your centerpull brake bolts to turn your bike into a dishing stand, and then true the wheel
    while its upside-down on the bike. This is by far the most affordable technique, since not only is a
    dishing tool not required, but a trueing stand is also not required. Warning: your out-of-round-ness
    may vary ... :) :)

    This technique is potentially much more accurate than the mark-your-wall method, the dining room
    glasses method, the flip-it truing stand method, and even the shop dishing-tool method, because your
    bike's alignment is the final judge of whether your wheel is dished properly or not.

    And after all, what serious rider hasn't crashed their bike lately?

    - Don Gillies San Diego, CA
     
  9. Clever... The least amount of tools You win Speedy

    Mark Hickey wrote:

    > Rich <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    > >and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    > >couldn't trust it's center mark.
    > >
    > >The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel
    > >over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until
    > >a flip fit perfectly back between the feelers.
    > >
    > >Does that make sense? It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a
    > >shop later to check it.
    > >
    > >Is there a better shade tree method.
    >
    > Lay the wheel on the floor without the skewer or tire, with one side of the rim touching the wall.
    > Mark where the rim touches the wall. Flip it over in exactly the same place and compare where the
    > rim touches to the mark you made. Half the difference is the dishing error.
    >
    > Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
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  10. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    S. Delaire "Rotatorrecumbent" wrote:
    > Clever... The least amount of tools You win

    Don't you hate it when rednecks are right.

    Good one Mark

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  11. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rich <[email protected]> writes:

    >Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >couldn't trust it's center mark.

    A piece of plywood with a straight edge can be made into a dishing tool easily. Just cut out enough
    from the middle so it will bridge over the axle and then use a C-clamp to attach a pointer. I use,
    as Mr. Johnson said, the lock nut rather than the axle end.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >couldn't trust it's center mark. The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to
    >touch the rim, flip the wheel over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip
    >and repeat. I did that until a flip fit perfectly back between the feelers. Does that make sense?
    >It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a shop later to check it. Is
    >there a better shade tree method.

    Makes sense, and it works. That's what I use to do before I got a dishing tool.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >>and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >>couldn't trust it's center mark. The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to
    >>touch the rim, flip the wheel over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip
    >>and repeat. I did that until a flip fit perfectly back between the feelers. Does that make sense?
    >>It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a shop later to check it. Is
    >>there a better shade tree method.
    >
    > Makes sense, and it works. That's what I use to do before I got a dishing tool.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
    >
    >

    This works, but you can make your own dishing tool for practically nothing. Instructions and
    pictures on my website cycling page.

    http://www.acampbell.org.uk/cycling/

    AC

    --
    <<|
    | http://www.acampbell.org.uk/cycling/
    _________ ,___o / \ __________ _\ <;_ / \ OCD Cycloclimbing ___________ (_)/ (_) / \
    http://www.ocd.org.uk
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  14. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 09:43:19 -0500, Rich <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Is there a way to do that? I was building a wheel last night for the first time away from a shop
    >and realized that I didn't have a dish tool. My truing stand isn't the most accurate device so I
    >couldn't trust it's center mark.
    >
    >The method I used was to set the feeler thingies on both sides to touch the rim, flip the wheel
    >over and true twords the side that had a gap, flip and repeat, flip and repeat. I did that until a
    >flip fit perfectly back between the feelers.
    >
    >Does that make sense? It looked fine in the frame when I was done. I was going to run it by a shop
    >later to check it.
    >
    >Is there a better shade tree method.

    The method you used works fine. I don't even have a truing stand (I build my wheels in either a rear
    triangle or an old front fork mounted by the steerer in my repair stand) so I dish a litttle
    differently.

    I use a flat surface (kitchen counter) and a machinist's square. With the tire and skewer removed
    lay the wheel on the flat surface with one spot on the rim in contact with the surface. With the
    square measure the height of the rim edge 180 degrees opposite the surface contact (easy to find
    using either opposing spokes or the stem hole and rim joint). Flip the wheel over and measure again.
    On a properly dished wheel th measurement will be the same. If not, adjust and measure again.

    Only caveat, make sure the axle ends extend from the locknuts the same distance on both sides. If
    not, adjust above measurement appropriately.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
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