Durable 23c or 25c Road Tires - Recommendations?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Steve Sr., Aug 16, 2005.

  1. Steve Sr.

    Steve Sr. Guest

    Hello,

    I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.

    I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.

    Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    limitations on how much pressure they will hold.

    Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?

    It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    like Performance. : - )

    Thanks,

    Steve
     
    Tags:


  2. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    Steve Sr. wrote:
    > ...and more importantly avoiding tube pinches.


    Do you mean snake bite pinch flats, or tube pinches between the tire
    bead and the rim?

    I guess just be careful to top off your tire pressure prior to rides, be
    careful when mounting tires, and use properly sized,
    non-super-duper-lightweight tubes.

    > Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?
    >
    > It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    > like Performance. : - )


    Since you mention Performance, I've had good luck with their Forte Pro
    tire in the 23-622 size:

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=11461&subcategory_ID=5420

    The only flats I've had on it were of the valve tear-out variety (a
    number of Performance brand tubes), i.e. a tube defect (or a pumping
    technique defect on my part).

    I've used it mainly as a front tire though, and for the rear tire I have
    a Specialized Turbo Sport 26-622 (OEM tire with my bike) that has been
    good as well, though it has gotten more cuts and gouges than the Forte
    Pro (likely a consequence of being a rear tire under a heavy rider, i.e.
    me :), enough for me to replace it after maybe 1,000 miles after the
    OEM tube tore at a seam and blew, giving me a good opportunity to
    examine the tire carefully.

    --
    I do not accept unsolicited commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for
    legitimate replies.
     
  3. "Steve Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    > are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    > pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    > surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.
    >
    > I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    > position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    > finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    > 120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    > tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.
    >
    > Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    > bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    > limitations on how much pressure they will hold.
    >
    > Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?
    >
    > It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    > like Performance. : - )
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Steve


    My road bike has Maxxis 700cX25's Detonators on it.The only problems I had
    was I damaged the front tire air valve on one tube and replaced it with a
    new tube that had a micro-pinhole leak on the seam, it would slowly leak out
    after about 16 hours or so, so i had to put in a second tube.
    But heck the tires never let me down, I rode in the local MS150 from Frisco
    TX to Ardmore TX, and at that time I weighed about 235 pounds. Plus I had a
    Camelback hydration system too. I would inflate them to max and they worked
    great even on our rough Texas roads.

    Man it must be nice to weigh so little, I cannot beleive you are worrying
    about weight issues at 160 pounds.
    I violate the warranties on just about everything when I ride.
     
  4. maxo

    maxo Guest

    A little wider than you wanted, but I think they're perfect for your
    use,
    the Hutchinson Flash tire's on at sale at Nashbar for $5.

    700x28, which will give you a little more float and prevent "snakebite"
    punctures.


    They're reasonably light, especially compared to a Conti TT or a
    Schwalbe
    Marathon, roll nicely, and have sturdy casings and sidewalls. They're
    not
    going to roll as fast as something more supple and probably more
    fragile--but I'm no slower than I was on 25mm skinwalls.

    I'm on my second set, I like them so much--I ride a lot of broken city
    pavement and routes strewn with glass. I had one flat in October with
    them--running over a half a bottle in the rain. Don't thing any tire
    could
    have handled that. :p Any reduction in speed (again, I don't feel
    slower)
    is hugely outweighed by the fact that I don't worry about flats or
    sidewall failures caused by abrasions. Heck, I even take them on some
    dirt
    trails down here by the river. :p

    Anyhow, they're CHEAP, so even if you get something else at Nashbar,
    you
    can get a set to just try, and unmount if you don't like.




    http://tinyurl.com/7cuyw

    If I had the money I'd try out those really cool Tufo tubular/clincher
    cyclocross tires they've got on save for $40 a pop. 28mm wide and
    pretty darn sturdy.
     
  5. maxo

    maxo Guest

    sorry about the line-wrap--my new news server is wonky so I had to use
    G2--cut and paste was a bad idea. X)
     
  6. Steve Sr. wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    >are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    >pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    >surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.
    >
    >I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    >position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    >finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    >120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    >tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.
    >
    >Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    >bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    >limitations on how much pressure they will hold.
    >
    >Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?
    >
    >It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    >like Performance. : - )
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Steve
    >
    >

    You may want to check your pump for a true tire pressure. I weigh over
    180 pounds, and I inflate my tires to about 120 psi (I think my pump
    shows a higher than actual pressure). I don't get any pinch flats
    unless I have let the pressure get too low. I pump my tires about twice
    a week, and I ride 6 - 7 days a week.

    If the gravel you ride over is "broken rock", maybe you could get pinch
    flats from that, but it seems unlikely to me.

    I currently am using Vittoria Rubino Pro tires. I have one folding
    tire, and one wire bead tire. I bought a pair of folding tires and used
    up the first one on the rear. About the time I needed to mount a new
    front, the rear was gone. Luckily (for my style points), my local shop
    had the wire bead tire, and it cost only about half what the folding
    tire cost (under $20 at my LBS).

    I have about 3600 km (2300 miles) on the tires, without a flat or any
    other problems. The expensive (folding) tire is on the front. The wire
    bead tire on the rear is starting to look "flat" across the black center
    tread. Amazingly, neither tire shows any cuts or gouges in the tread.

    I ride city streets and bike trails in the Orange County / LA County
    area of California. Generally, there is some glass to avoid, and often
    enough, a few metal objects that could damage a tire. The pinch flats
    I've gotten have usually been from hitting pot holes. I try to be
    careful at railroad crossings, and stand up if I don't know the crossing
    to be smooth.

    I got a good deal on a pair of Michelin Pro2 Race tires through my club,
    but I'm thinking I'll get another wire bead Vittoria for the rear before
    I ever put the Michelins on the ground. I've ridden these tires
    previously to the Vittorias, and went through two rears and the Vittoria
    folding tire before the front wore out (probably 6000 - 8000 miles!).
    That makes the cost a bit more bearable.

    A friend is using Continental Ultra 2000 wire bead tires, and is very
    happy with the tread life. He commutes a couple of days a week, and
    does fast training rides two nights a week, and finds the tires suitable
    for both uses. I have these tires on my second road bike, and on my
    clincher-equipped (!) track bike. I'm not riding either one at present,
    though.
     
  7. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    Use larger tyres, such as Continental Gatorskin 700x78.

    Nick
     
  8. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Colin Campbell wrote:
    > A friend is using Continental Ultra 2000 wire bead tires, and is very
    > happy with the tread life. He commutes a couple of days a week, and
    > does fast training rides two nights a week, and finds the tires suitable
    > for both uses. I have these tires on my second road bike, and on my
    > clincher-equipped (!) track bike. I'm not riding either one at present,
    > though.


    Another vote for the Conti Ultra 2000's. Definitely not sticky enough
    for aggressive cornering, but the tread life is incredible. An
    excellent commuting/training tire.
     
  9. On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 21:09:24 -0500, "Earl Bollinger"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Maxxis Detonators


    Is it just me, or does that seem like a poor choice of name for a bike
    tire?

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  10. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    Nick Payne wrote:
    > Use larger tyres, such as Continental Gatorskin 700x78.
    >

    a 78 surely will be large enough....
     
  11. colocraig

    colocraig Guest

    After 3000 miles without a flat (I'll be sorry I said that), I can
    recommend the 25 mm Michelin Carbon tires. My usage has been 90% on
    paved roads, but the other 10% has been dirt and fine gravel without
    any problems yet. They ride just fine. I'm 150 lbs and use 100 psi in
    front and 110 in the rear.
     
  12. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Steve Sr. <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    >are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    >pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    >surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.
    >
    >I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    >position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    >finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    >120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    >tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.
    >
    >Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    >bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    >limitations on how much pressure they will hold.


    I recommend the Panaracer T-Serv tires. Light, foldable, "almost"
    flat-proof (as good or better than the Conti Gatorskins, IMHO), and
    they wear like iron. The really good news is that they feel like
    "performance tires" unlike some armored tires (like the Specialized
    Armadillos).

    Mark Hickey
    Habanero Cycles
    http://www.habcycles.com
    Home of the $795 ti frame
     
  13. smokva

    smokva Guest

    Steve Sr. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Hello,
    >
    >I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    >are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    >pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    >surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.


    I would get Michelim Megamium or Michelim Carbon. I prefer Megamium.
     
  14. Larry

    Larry Guest

    Don't be to quick to not use the Michelin Pro2 I just changed my first set
    4433 miles, no flat's the rear just began to show through and the front
    looked new. I change both anyway. Great tire.

    "Colin Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Steve Sr. wrote:
    >
    >>Hello,
    >>
    >>I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    >>are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    >>pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    >>surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.
    >>
    >>I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    >>position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    >>finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    >>120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    >>tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.
    >>
    >>Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    >>bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    >>limitations on how much pressure they will hold.
    >>
    >>Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?
    >>
    >>It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    >>like Performance. : - )
    >>
    >>Thanks,
    >>
    >>Steve
    >>

    > You may want to check your pump for a true tire pressure. I weigh over
    > 180 pounds, and I inflate my tires to about 120 psi (I think my pump shows
    > a higher than actual pressure). I don't get any pinch flats unless I have
    > let the pressure get too low. I pump my tires about twice a week, and I
    > ride 6 - 7 days a week.
    >
    > If the gravel you ride over is "broken rock", maybe you could get pinch
    > flats from that, but it seems unlikely to me.
    >
    > I currently am using Vittoria Rubino Pro tires. I have one folding tire,
    > and one wire bead tire. I bought a pair of folding tires and used up the
    > first one on the rear. About the time I needed to mount a new front, the
    > rear was gone. Luckily (for my style points), my local shop had the wire
    > bead tire, and it cost only about half what the folding tire cost (under
    > $20 at my LBS).
    > I have about 3600 km (2300 miles) on the tires, without a flat or any
    > other problems. The expensive (folding) tire is on the front. The wire
    > bead tire on the rear is starting to look "flat" across the black center
    > tread. Amazingly, neither tire shows any cuts or gouges in the tread.
    >
    > I ride city streets and bike trails in the Orange County / LA County area
    > of California. Generally, there is some glass to avoid, and often enough,
    > a few metal objects that could damage a tire. The pinch flats I've gotten
    > have usually been from hitting pot holes. I try to be careful at railroad
    > crossings, and stand up if I don't know the crossing to be smooth.
    >
    > I got a good deal on a pair of Michelin Pro2 Race tires through my club,
    > but I'm thinking I'll get another wire bead Vittoria for the rear before I
    > ever put the Michelins on the ground. I've ridden these tires previously
    > to the Vittorias, and went through two rears and the Vittoria folding tire
    > before the front wore out (probably 6000 - 8000 miles!). That makes the
    > cost a bit more bearable.
    >
    > A friend is using Continental Ultra 2000 wire bead tires, and is very
    > happy with the tread life. He commutes a couple of days a week, and does
    > fast training rides two nights a week, and finds the tires suitable for
    > both uses. I have these tires on my second road bike, and on my
    > clincher-equipped (!) track bike. I'm not riding either one at present,
    > though.
     
  15. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    >I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    >position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    >finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    >120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    >tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.


    FWIW, I have been running 25C tires on our tandem @ 120 psi without pinch
    flatting. Team weight is ~ 265 pounds.

    These days we are using Bontrager Race X Lite AC's.


    Chris Neary
    [email protected]

    Chris & Tracey
    1999 Co-Motion Speedster
     
  16. Steve Sr. wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    > are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    > pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    > surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.
    >
    > I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    > position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    > finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    > 120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    > tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.
    >
    > Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    > bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    > limitations on how much pressure they will hold.
    >
    > Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?
    >
    > It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    > like Performance. : - )
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Steve


    Continental Gatorskin tires. 23, 25, 28 mm widths available in wire
    bead. Or the expensive kevlar bead version they call 4 Season I think.
    Extra, extra tough sidewalls on these tires. I just replaced the
    front tire after putting it on in August 2001. Since then it went
    across/around the states of Iowa, North Dakota, Kansas, Wisconsin,
    Colorado, North Carolina, Tennessee, Indiana. About 4,000 miles. Add
    another 2,000 brevet miles. Plus several more thousand miles of
    general riding. I can't complain. The sidewalls did look ragged at
    the end. But still tough. The tread was split and coming off the
    casing so I pre-emptively replaced it. Rear tire did not last quite
    that long. It did give several thousand miles before I picked up
    something in the tread I could not get out so I had to toss the tire.
    It was near its end by then.

    Bad tire is the Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp Hand Made in Holland. Very
    short tread life on the rear. Feels underinflated and squishy even
    when its at 140 psi. Sidewall and tread blew out on the front tire.
    Can't wait to use up my awful stock. I'm too cheap to toss the new
    unused awful tires.

    Continental Ultra 3000 is cheap. But not durable. Easy to cut
    sidewall. Does not resist flats very well. But its cheap ($11) so I
    don't mind tossing them if they pick up something I cannot get out of
    the tread.
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    >Hello,
    >I am looking for some recommendations for some durable road tires that
    >are fairly resistant to punctures and more importantly avoiding tube
    >pinches. The roads that I ride on are mostly rural with varying
    >surface qualities. The worst being tar and gravel.
    >I only weigh about 160 pounds but the bike has a fairly upright riding
    >position which transfers most of the weight to the rear tire. I am
    >finding that this leads to pinch flats even with tires inflated to
    >120psi which is the current tires maximum. I think the issue on the
    >tire is too many pounds and not enough square inches to distribute it.


    Pinch flats can be minimized by checking your tire pressure regularly.
    If you are concerned with pinch flats, the 25c tire is the better choice
    for you.

    >Any preference between wire bead (non folding) or kevlar (folding)
    >bead types? I guess the folding variety weigh less but may also have
    >limitations on how much pressure they will hold.


    Save your money and get the wire beaded tires. The bead only makes a
    difference if you need to fold a tire to carry as a spare or if you are
    a real weight weenie, not that there is anything wrong with that.


    >Any particular brands/styles of tires to avoid?


    Avoid any 'racing' tires. They usually have thin tread so that they can
    advertise really low weights. That means they will wear out faster and
    are more pronce to flats.

    >It also wouldn't hurt if they were periodically on sale at a place
    >like Performance. : - )


    I prefer Nahsbar. Yes, I know Peformance owns Nashbar.
    -----------
    Alex
     
  18. Steve knight

    Steve knight Guest

    been real happy with bonganger race lit hard case tires. they hold up
    to my 220 weight and never had a flat even with glass and steel stuck
    in them.
    Knight-Toolworks
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com
    affordable handmade wooden planes
     
  19. rcoder

    rcoder Guest

    I used to do this maniacal little laugh whenever I rode over broken
    glass, nails, or any other road debris on my Specialized Armadillos --
    I've had two sets (on a couple of bikes), and after something like 2k
    mi. on each pair, they never gave me so much as one pinch or puncture
    flat. Heck, even a 40mph slide through gravel at >45% pitch only
    scuffed up the sidewalls a bit -- much better than the skin on my legs
    and butt held up to the same terrain, I might add.

    There was actually an ongoing bet between myself and a couple of
    friends who bought the Bontrager Racelite "Hard Case" commuter tires,
    since we had both gone >1 yr. between flats. Finally, one of the
    Bontragers went out first, but to be fair, it was from running over an
    unbroken beer bottle, (breaking it in the process, of course) which
    left a 1 in. long gash in the rear tire.

    Of course, they roll like a couple of garden hoses, and I wouldn't
    recommend you try to do any racing or even fast club riding on them.
    For commuting and touring, though, I think they're pretty tough to
    beat.

    -Lennon
     
  20. Pete

    Pete Guest

    I had a frequent flat problem after moving from suburbia to the downtown
    core. I was using a good quality "training" tire at the time, 25mm. Someone
    else on here suggested IRC Road Winners. I ended up buying a pair, nominally
    28mm, with a kevlar belt. They actually measure exactly 25mm wide, and I
    haven't had a flat yet.
    Pierre
     
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