Good bicycles for kids

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by vwpalmer, Dec 30, 2004.

  1. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    I've scanned through and not seen much about this - when I was a kid in
    the 1960s, my father bought me a very nice English-made 3/4 sized
    bicycle. I rode it for years, then my sister and two godchildren rode
    it - and it still wasn't worn out.

    However, I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    - of the commonly available kid's bikes. Does anyone make anything like
    what I had as a child? I think it was called a touring frame with
    non-dropped handlebars and it had a 3 speed gear ... we'd dearly like to
    get the kids bicycles they can enjoy riding instead of the trashy
    heavyweights that seem to be standard stock these days. Not a mountain
    bike, not a bike for stunts, etc. just the kind of bike a kid can ride
    for a few miles on.
     
    Tags:


  2. Pat

    Pat Guest

    :
    : However, I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    : appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    : - of the commonly available kid's bikes. Does anyone make anything like
    : what I had as a child? I think it was called a touring frame with
    : non-dropped handlebars and it had a 3 speed gear ... we'd dearly like to
    : get the kids bicycles they can enjoy riding instead of the trashy
    : heavyweights that seem to be standard stock these days. Not a mountain
    : bike, not a bike for stunts, etc. just the kind of bike a kid can ride
    : for a few miles on.

    Where are you located?

    Pat in TX
    :
    :
     
  3. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    I'm in Atlanta, my folks are in SC and the kids live in the DC area. My
    father will happily order from just about anywhere in the CONUS if he
    can find appropriate bikes for the kids.

    Pat wrote:
    > :
    > : However, I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    > : appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    > : - of the commonly available kid's bikes. Does anyone make anything like
    > : what I had as a child? I think it was called a touring frame with
    > : non-dropped handlebars and it had a 3 speed gear ... we'd dearly like to
    > : get the kids bicycles they can enjoy riding instead of the trashy
    > : heavyweights that seem to be standard stock these days. Not a mountain
    > : bike, not a bike for stunts, etc. just the kind of bike a kid can ride
    > : for a few miles on.
    >
    > Where are you located?
    >
    > Pat in TX
    > :
    > :
    >
    >
     
  4. NYRides

    NYRides Guest

    You need to be conscious of the fact that kids have a need to conform when
    it comes to something as personal as a bicycle. Yes, the quality of what's
    out there may not seem up to par with what you or I had as a kid, but in the
    end, if you get the kid a great quality bicycle that all the other kids
    laugh at, you're going to lose anyway.

    When my kids were pre-teenagers, the movie ET came out and started the BMX
    craze. Up until then, one was riding my old Schwinn Orange Crate and the
    other, my old Schwinn Lemon Peeler. For a while, they were the absolute
    coolest kids on the block. The day after they saw the movie, neither would
    ride those old heaps anymore. Eventually, they each saved enough money to
    plunk down most of the $400 for their new Supergoose 20" bikes that, in my
    opinion, were made like garbage. But at least the kids rode again. I went
    through very similar situations with electronic gadgets, sports, equipment,
    etc. with them over the next several years. Today, they're smarter and more
    practical about their purchases, but at the time, they needed to fit in.

    More recently, I ran a bicycle recycling project in my community and
    supervised about 40 kid volunteers per year. I taught them all about what
    makes a quality bike and showed them the difference over and over.
    Fortunately, the kids in this neighborhood come from families that can well
    afford the best bikes out there. In the end, though, these kids all ran
    after the X-Games bikes or those death trap full-suspension mountain bikes
    from K-Mart. I felt like I had been preaching to a wall. But the truth is,
    when you're a teenager, it's not about doing the right thing -- it's about
    doing the cool thing, in spite of knowing better.

    Your niece and nephew will fast outgrow anything you buy them at this age.
    I say go to a bike shop (not a department store) and let them pick out what
    appeals to them, as long as it's within your budget. If it's a decent shop,
    they won't let you buy something dangerous.

    "vwpalmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've scanned through and not seen much about this - when I was a kid in
    > the 1960s, my father bought me a very nice English-made 3/4 sized
    > bicycle. I rode it for years, then my sister and two godchildren rode
    > it - and it still wasn't worn out.
    >
    > However, I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    > appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    > - of the commonly available kid's bikes. Does anyone make anything like
    > what I had as a child? I think it was called a touring frame with
    > non-dropped handlebars and it had a 3 speed gear ... we'd dearly like to
    > get the kids bicycles they can enjoy riding instead of the trashy
    > heavyweights that seem to be standard stock these days. Not a mountain
    > bike, not a bike for stunts, etc. just the kind of bike a kid can ride
    > for a few miles on.
    >
    >
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest

    "vwpalmer" <: I'm in Atlanta, my folks are in SC and the kids live in the DC
    area. My
    : father will happily order from just about anywhere in the CONUS if he
    : can find appropriate bikes for the kids.

    That's a start. From what you wrote previously, I thought you must be in the
    United Kingdom. if you don't want junk for a kid's bike, you need to visit
    some local bike shops and talk to the guys that run the shops. Think of it
    as gathering information from the pro's. They know what's available. I
    bought a bike that is a semi-recumbent for a kid. It gets stares and "Nice
    ride!" yells from neighborhood kids, too.
    http://www.evoxcycle.com/Html/modeles_en.html

    I got it at a great discount at a Galyan's store (which has now been bought
    out by Dick's Sporting Goods here in Texas).

    Pat
     
  6. Myo Jorn

    Myo Jorn Guest

  7. Pat

    Pat Guest

    "NYRides" <: You need to be conscious of the fact that kids have a need to
    conform when
    : it comes to something as personal as a bicycle. Yes, the quality of
    what's
    : out there may not seem up to par with what you or I had as a kid, but in
    the
    : end, if you get the kid a great quality bicycle that all the other kids
    : laugh at, you're going to lose anyway.

    Another thing is that if you buy a quality bike in the first place, it will
    hold its value and sell for more when you do get rid of it. When my older
    son was about 6, I paid $45 for a Schwinn 20" bike and later sold it for $25
    a few years later. At that time, the common Sears bike cost about $20 and
    in a year or so, were worth nothing for resale (because the components were
    junk to begin with, the bikes wore out quickly). The Schwinn bikes had
    ball-bearings in the bottom bracket whereas the Sears bikes had plastic
    sleeves there. Once that plastic sleeve was worn through, the bike was
    junk.

    Pat in TX
     
  8. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    They aren't allowed to watch television. This cures a lot of the
    fad-stuff and they know, from watching how easily their mom and
    grandfather ride, that their trendy bikes don't cut it. Furthermore,
    sister has started riding to school with them 3 miles and they leave
    their bikes and she rides home and then rides back in the afternoon to
    meet them to ride home. They have already said they want a bike like
    their Mom's (it's a 10 speed, but with the handlebars for sitting
    upright?). I'll suggest that my dad take the kids to a bike shop in the
    DC area when he is up there next, although a couple of makers names who
    make good kids bikes would be a help, since Dad hasn't bought a child's
    bicycle since the late 1960s
    I have bad fibromyalgia and cannot tolerate riding a bicycle anymore,
    but miss it badly - was a milbrat and had the aforementioned bike and
    then a couple of Italian bikes bought on the other side of the pond

    NYRides wrote:
    > You need to be conscious of the fact that kids have a need to conform when
    > it comes to something as personal as a bicycle. Yes, the quality of what's
    > out there may not seem up to par with what you or I had as a kid, but in the
    > end, if you get the kid a great quality bicycle that all the other kids
    > laugh at, you're going to lose anyway.
    >
    > When my kids were pre-teenagers, the movie ET came out and started the BMX
    > craze. Up until then, one was riding my old Schwinn Orange Crate and the
    > other, my old Schwinn Lemon Peeler. For a while, they were the absolute
    > coolest kids on the block. The day after they saw the movie, neither would
    > ride those old heaps anymore. Eventually, they each saved enough money to
    > plunk down most of the $400 for their new Supergoose 20" bikes that, in my
    > opinion, were made like garbage. But at least the kids rode again. I went
    > through very similar situations with electronic gadgets, sports, equipment,
    > etc. with them over the next several years. Today, they're smarter and more
    > practical about their purchases, but at the time, they needed to fit in.
    >
    > More recently, I ran a bicycle recycling project in my community and
    > supervised about 40 kid volunteers per year. I taught them all about what
    > makes a quality bike and showed them the difference over and over.
    > Fortunately, the kids in this neighborhood come from families that can well
    > afford the best bikes out there. In the end, though, these kids all ran
    > after the X-Games bikes or those death trap full-suspension mountain bikes
    > from K-Mart. I felt like I had been preaching to a wall. But the truth is,
    > when you're a teenager, it's not about doing the right thing -- it's about
    > doing the cool thing, in spite of knowing better.
    >
    > Your niece and nephew will fast outgrow anything you buy them at this age.
    > I say go to a bike shop (not a department store) and let them pick out what
    > appeals to them, as long as it's within your budget. If it's a decent shop,
    > they won't let you buy something dangerous.
    >
    > "vwpalmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>I've scanned through and not seen much about this - when I was a kid in
    >>the 1960s, my father bought me a very nice English-made 3/4 sized
    >>bicycle. I rode it for years, then my sister and two godchildren rode
    >>it - and it still wasn't worn out.
    >>
    >>However, I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    >>appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    >>- of the commonly available kid's bikes. Does anyone make anything like
    >>what I had as a child? I think it was called a touring frame with
    >>non-dropped handlebars and it had a 3 speed gear ... we'd dearly like to
    >>get the kids bicycles they can enjoy riding instead of the trashy
    >>heavyweights that seem to be standard stock these days. Not a mountain
    >>bike, not a bike for stunts, etc. just the kind of bike a kid can ride
    >>for a few miles on.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
     
  9. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    Pat wrote:
    >
    > I got it at a great discount at a Galyan's store (which

    has now been
    > bought out by Dick's Sporting Goods here in Texas).
    >

    The local Galyan's has started a 50% off sale on all lines
    which are not carried by Dick's. This includes all Galyan's
    private label (need white crew socks anybody) and also bike
    lines such as Haro. I picked up a nice pair of Ritchey SPD
    pedals for 50% off. This has been going on for a couple of
    weeks, so the bikes are probably picked over.
     
  10. Pat

    Pat Guest

    : The local Galyan's has started a 50% off sale on all lines
    : which are not carried by Dick's. This includes all Galyan's
    : private label (need white crew socks anybody) and also bike
    : lines such as Haro. I picked up a nice pair of Ritchey SPD
    : pedals for 50% off. This has been going on for a couple of
    : weeks, so the bikes are probably picked over.

    When our local store put those ads in the paper, they carefully did not
    mention the bicycles section, so I figured it wouldn't be worthwhile to go
    there. I just thought they were only selling the Galyan's branded clothes on
    sale. My bad, evidently. I am sure they have converted over by now.....

    Pat in TX
     
  11. Pat

    Pat Guest

    : They aren't allowed to watch television. This cures a lot of the
    : fad-stuff and they know, from watching how easily their mom and
    : grandfather ride, that their trendy bikes don't cut it. Furthermore,
    : sister has started riding to school with them 3 miles and they leave
    : their bikes and she rides home and then rides back in the afternoon to
    : meet them to ride home. They have already said they want a bike like
    : their Mom's (it's a 10 speed, but with the handlebars for sitting
    : upright?). I'll suggest that my dad take the kids to a bike shop in the
    : DC area when he is up there next, although a couple of makers names who
    : make good kids bikes would be a help, since Dad hasn't bought a child's
    : bicycle since the late 1960s
    : I have bad fibromyalgia and cannot tolerate riding a bicycle anymore,
    : but miss it badly - was a milbrat and had the aforementioned bike and
    : then a couple of Italian bikes bought on the other side of the pond

    I don't recall you mentioning the ages of the children. Also, for yourself,
    have you looked into recumbent bicycles or trikes? You will be surprised at
    what is available today, especially in the trikes lines.
    www.hostelshoppe.com also, look here: http://tinyurl.com/6gl5y

    Pat in TX
     
  12. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    > : I have bad fibromyalgia and cannot tolerate riding a bicycle anymore,
    > : but miss it badly - was a milbrat and had the aforementioned bike and
    > : then a couple of Italian bikes bought on the other side of the pond
    >
    > I don't recall you mentioning the ages of the children. Also, for yourself,
    > have you looked into recumbent bicycles or trikes? You will be surprised at
    > what is available today, especially in the trikes lines.
    > www.hostelshoppe.com also, look here: http://tinyurl.com/6gl5y


    It's not joint stress, it's exercise intolerance. I swim, but even then
    I have to be careful - overdo it and I spend 3-5 days doing no more than
    the minimum work and "life support". Unfortunately, with fibro, you
    just can't build up endurance, you're always back at square one, it
    seems. I have hopes that one of these days they will figure out what
    causes fibro and have a "fix"

    The kids are 8 and 6. The 8-y-o girl is long legged and her 6-y-o
    brother appears to be one of those natural athletes - they are terrific
    kids and the fact that they've been kept away from teevee for the most
    part means they're a lot of fun and much more active than most kids.
     
  13. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    thanks - we found that web site and my dad is looking at it. he'll
    probably try to find a dealer in the DC area to take the kids to on
    their next trip.

    Myo Jorn wrote:

    > I personally like these bikes for kids.
    >
    > http://www.fisherbikes.com/bikes/series.asp?series=kids
    >
    > In my oppinion, Gary Fisher makes well built, safe, and cool looking
    > bikes that appeal to everyone.
    >
    > Myo
    >
     
  14. On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 01:36:18 GMT, vwpalmer <[email protected]>
    wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    >appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    >- of the commonly available kid's bikes.


    Tell me about it.

    We ended up with an aluminium Trek for my younger son, but even that
    is heavier than we wanted. He fell in love with the label because
    Lance has one...

    The best kids' bikes I've seen, by a country mile, are made by Puky, a
    German company - these are expensive but they are 100% pukka bikes
    with geometry designed specifically for kids, rather than scaled-down
    adult bikes. My older son is big for his age so went to a 24" rigid
    fork MTB (Dawes brand) aged 8.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
     
  15. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    vwpalmer <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've scanned through and not seen much about this - when I was a kid in
    > the 1960s, my father bought me a very nice English-made 3/4 sized
    > bicycle. I rode it for years, then my sister and two godchildren rode
    > it - and it still wasn't worn out.
    >
    > However, I now have a 8-y-o niece and an a 6-y-o nephew and we are all
    > appalled at the dismal quality and configuration - as well as the weight
    > - of the commonly available kid's bikes. Does anyone make anything like
    > what I had as a child? I think it was called a touring frame with
    > non-dropped handlebars and it had a 3 speed gear ... we'd dearly like to
    > get the kids bicycles they can enjoy riding instead of the trashy
    > heavyweights that seem to be standard stock these days. Not a mountain
    > bike, not a bike for stunts, etc. just the kind of bike a kid can ride
    > for a few miles on.


    Argh. I saw the perfect bike about six months ago, a used Marin rigid
    mountain bike in a rather small size.

    I daresay that no serious bicycle for kids is likely to be heavier than
    the three-speed of your youth. I know you're probably not looking for a
    BMX, either, but if you want a high-end, lightweight bicycle for kids
    this age, and you don't want to go all out into the weird realm of a
    very small road bike (which would be silly for kids this age), a racing
    BMX makes a sensible choice:

    http://norco.com/05/2005bikes/bmx.php

    That there's a lightweight aluminum-framed bike with 20" wheels, which
    means that road-riffic slick tires are available for that bike, if you
    want to go that way. I'd add a front brake for normal riding.

    Juvenile mountain bikes on the serious end of the scale make a logical
    step up from there:

    http://norco.com/05/2005bikes/kids.php

    If you want to make that bike fast, change the tires out for slicks.
    That's a hard thing to find, but as always, Sheldon has 'em:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/tires/507.html

    I know it seems like I'm steering you towards the exact kind of bike
    you're arguing against, but there's some sense here. These bikes (and
    the Fishers suggested elsewhere) are kid-sized non-crap bicycles.
    Despite the dirt-oriented heritage of either of these machines, they
    would make fast and light road machines for kids as young as your
    sibling's children here. The second bike there has a 12-speed
    drivetrain, which is enough for anything a 9-12 year old would do, and
    will take them as far and fast as their legs can manage.

    I'm not in the have-children phase quite yet, but I would be glad to see
    my 6-8 year old on a bicycle like this. I think you may want to examine
    how far or fast a 6-year old will go on a bicycle: at that age, I am
    suspicious (perhaps incorrectly) that little legs would tire easily, and
    little brains wouldn't have enough traffic sense to be safe unescorted.

    There is one other item you may not be aware of, the much-loved
    Trail-a-Bike. Fisher has 'em too, but here's the Norco (Adams) unit:

    http://www.totalbike.com/reviews/adams_trailbike.html

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com
    Verus de parvis; verus de magnis.
     
  16. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    > Argh. I saw the perfect bike about six months ago, a used Marin rigid
    > mountain bike in a rather small size.
    >
    > I daresay that no serious bicycle for kids is likely to be heavier than
    > the three-speed of your youth. I know you're probably not looking for a
    > BMX, either, but if you want a high-end, lightweight bicycle for kids
    > this age, and you don't want to go all out into the weird realm of a
    > very small road bike (which would be silly for kids this age), a racing
    > BMX makes a sensible choice:


    The little bicycle that I had was light enough for a 6 year old - I was
    on the long and wiry side - to pick up without any difficylty - I
    certainly don't remember any. Graduated straight from that into a adult
    bike in 4th grade or so - niece shows every sign of being tall like her
    aunt and father rather than her mother, so she may only be a year or so
    away from a "proper bicycle"



    > I know it seems like I'm steering you towards the exact kind of bike
    > you're arguing against, but there's some sense here. These bikes (and
    > the Fishers suggested elsewhere) are kid-sized non-crap bicycles.
    > Despite the dirt-oriented heritage of either of these machines, they
    > would make fast and light road machines for kids as young as your
    > sibling's children here. The second bike there has a 12-speed
    > drivetrain, which is enough for anything a 9-12 year old would do, and
    > will take them as far and fast as their legs can manage.


    We want them to have something where the riding - rather than the weight
    - is what tires them, that they can pick up by themselves if need be and
    that keeps them sitting in a good and safe posture while they're riding.
    They live in a DC 'burb, and as I said, my sister has gotten so
    disgusted with the constant driving children everywhere, that most days,
    she rides her bicycle with the kids to school, leaves them and then
    returns to ride back with them. Their existing bikes are not cheap, but
    they simply aren't "right" for real riding vs. noodling around in front
    of the house .....


    > I'm not in the have-children phase quite yet, but I would be glad to see
    > my 6-8 year old on a bicycle like this. I think you may want to examine
    > how far or fast a 6-year old will go on a bicycle: at that age, I am
    > suspicious (perhaps incorrectly) that little legs would tire easily, and
    > little brains wouldn't have enough traffic sense to be safe unescorted.


    On their current bikes, in fair weather, they are going 2.7 miles each
    way from home to the oldest's school ... only having to get down and
    walk the bikes at two bad intersections; then the youngest goes another
    ..7 miles to his school. My sister rides with them and their bikes are
    locked at school and she keeps the key to avoid unescorted adventures.
    Unfortunately, in the big city, kids don't do anything outside the house
    without supervision, so the unescorted thing isn't a worry. The fact
    that predators in our society have free rein has destroyed the freedoms
    of childhood in my lifetime ....

    > There is one other item you may not be aware of, the much-loved
    > Trail-a-Bike. Fisher has 'em too, but here's the Norco (Adams) unit:
    >
    > http://www.totalbike.com/reviews/adams_trailbike.html
    >


    I am sending these on to my father, who is the prime mover here.
    Frankly, if the bike makers don't make scaled down (in size) and
    slightly less complex bikes, but made in the proper configuration vs
    what's out there for kids, they are losing the chance to snag more
    riders young and "raise" them to want to continue riding - and buying
    bicycles. I know my early experience with the aforementioned English
    bikes and then the Italian bikes bought when we were stationed in Italy,
    resulted in me riding a bicycle much longer than many of my peers.
     
  17. Pat

    Pat Guest

    :
    : The little bicycle that I had was light enough for a 6 year old - I was
    : on the long and wiry side - to pick up without any difficylty - I
    : certainly don't remember any. Graduated straight from that into a adult
    : bike in 4th grade or so - niece shows every sign of being tall like her
    : aunt and father rather than her mother, so she may only be a year or so
    : away from a "proper bicycle"

    Over the pre-Christmas shopping season, I was in a store that had some BMX
    bikes for kids on sale. I bent over to pick one up with one hand (my other
    arm being in a sling) and I could barely lift the thing without some real
    effort! It must have weighed over 50 pounds, easily, and it was junk, junk,
    junk.

    I remember buying my son a bike with 24" wheels when he was about that age.
    I always believed in buying the bike to fit the kid rather than "letting him
    grow into it". When I was 7 my parents gave me a 3-speed "English Racer"
    and told me to grow into it. I had to use a step stool just to get on it,
    and stopping was a trick all in itself.



    The fact
    : that predators in our society have free rein has destroyed the freedoms
    : of childhood in my lifetime ....

    Don't kid yourself: there have always been predators.

    Pat in TX
     
  18. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    >
    > Over the pre-Christmas shopping season, I was in a store that had some BMX
    > bikes for kids on sale. I bent over to pick one up with one hand (my other
    > arm being in a sling) and I could barely lift the thing without some real
    > effort! It must have weighed over 50 pounds, easily, and it was junk, junk,
    > junk.


    That's exactly what we're concerned about. A srtong kid like my nephew
    has no problem picking up 20-25 lbs, but 50 pounds is nuts


    >
    > I remember buying my son a bike with 24" wheels when he was about that age.
    > I always believed in buying the bike to fit the kid rather than "letting him
    > grow into it". When I was 7 my parents gave me a 3-speed "English Racer"
    > and told me to grow into it. I had to use a step stool just to get on it,
    > and stopping was a trick all in itself.


    that's why I loved my little 3/4 size bike. it was the adult bike
    scaled down for a kid.

    >
    >
    >
    > The fact
    > : that predators in our society have free rein has destroyed the freedoms
    > : of childhood in my lifetime ....
    >
    > Don't kid yourself: there have always been predators.
    >


    I know they have always been there, but in the past no one worried about
    their rights to the point they they have freedom and children don't.
    The niece and nephew will never know the kind of freedom I had as a kid
    to roam and play unsupervised. Of course, growing up on military posts
    we were even safer than civilian kids ... the bent did not prosper in
    the military in those day, nor, I suspect now.
     
  19. In article <%[email protected]>,
    vwpalmer <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > Over the pre-Christmas shopping season, I was in a store that had some BMX
    > > bikes for kids on sale. I bent over to pick one up with one hand (my other
    > > arm being in a sling) and I could barely lift the thing without some real
    > > effort! It must have weighed over 50 pounds, easily, and it was junk, junk,
    > > junk.

    >
    > That's exactly what we're concerned about. A srtong kid like my nephew
    > has no problem picking up 20-25 lbs, but 50 pounds is nuts


    Trust me here: the mini-BMX bikes like the one from Norco I indicated
    are very light. they're racing machines. But you have to seek them out
    from a BMX racing-oriented shop.

    > > I remember buying my son a bike with 24" wheels when he was about that age.
    > > I always believed in buying the bike to fit the kid rather than "letting him
    > > grow into it". When I was 7 my parents gave me a 3-speed "English Racer"
    > > and told me to grow into it. I had to use a step stool just to get on it,
    > > and stopping was a trick all in itself.

    >
    > that's why I loved my little 3/4 size bike. it was the adult bike
    > scaled down for a kid.


    There is another option. A wonderful option...

    http://www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/Kids-BMX/Kids/Ages_9-12/KDR_1000/index.ph
    p

    Trek KDR 1000. A full-on road bike with 24" wheels, recommended for kids
    in the 53-65" height range.

    Trek is not the only company to make bikes like this. You may even be
    able to find a few of these for sale if you hang around the right kind
    of racing clubs.
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com
    Verus de parvis; verus de magnis.
     
  20. vwpalmer

    vwpalmer Guest

    I just ran across the trek bikes searching. I think this is very close
    to what my Dad wants to get the kids. If he follows pattern, he'll get
    a boy's bike that can be ridden by niece and then passed down to nephew
    ..... I never had a "girls" bike ....

    Smart of them to make a kid's bike that is the adults model shrunk -
    create brand loyalty early ....

    Ryan Cousineau wrote:
    > In article <%[email protected]>,
    > vwpalmer <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Over the pre-Christmas shopping season, I was in a store that had some BMX
    >>>bikes for kids on sale. I bent over to pick one up with one hand (my other
    >>>arm being in a sling) and I could barely lift the thing without some real
    >>>effort! It must have weighed over 50 pounds, easily, and it was junk, junk,
    >>>junk.

    >>
    >>That's exactly what we're concerned about. A srtong kid like my nephew
    >>has no problem picking up 20-25 lbs, but 50 pounds is nuts

    >
    >
    > Trust me here: the mini-BMX bikes like the one from Norco I indicated
    > are very light. they're racing machines. But you have to seek them out
    > from a BMX racing-oriented shop.
    >
    >
    >>>I remember buying my son a bike with 24" wheels when he was about that age.
    >>>I always believed in buying the bike to fit the kid rather than "letting him
    >>>grow into it". When I was 7 my parents gave me a 3-speed "English Racer"
    >>>and told me to grow into it. I had to use a step stool just to get on it,
    >>>and stopping was a trick all in itself.

    >>
    >>that's why I loved my little 3/4 size bike. it was the adult bike
    >>scaled down for a kid.

    >
    >
    > There is another option. A wonderful option...
    >
    > http://www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/Kids-BMX/Kids/Ages_9-12/KDR_1000/index.ph
    > p
    >
    > Trek KDR 1000. A full-on road bike with 24" wheels, recommended for kids
    > in the 53-65" height range.
    >
    > Trek is not the only company to make bikes like this. You may even be
    > able to find a few of these for sale if you hang around the right kind
    > of racing clubs.
     
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