Have SRAM low-end chains been discontinued?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by BCDrums, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. BCDrums

    BCDrums Guest

    I was at the LBS to pick up a new chain yesterday. I wanted a SRAM PC59
    or 69 to replace the PC59 I had. The shop manager told me these chains
    had been discontinued. He sold me a PC971 (a higher-priced chain).

    I had fine shifting with the $20 PC59, can't imagine that a more
    expensive chain will improve performance. And I am not a gram shaver.
    Was the shop manager misinformed about these chains?

    BC
     
    Tags:


  2. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I was at the LBS to pick up a new chain yesterday. I wanted a SRAM PC59
    > or 69 to replace the PC59 I had. The shop manager told me these chains
    > had been discontinued. He sold me a PC971 (a higher-priced chain).
    >
    > I had fine shifting with the $20 PC59, can't imagine that a more
    > expensive chain will improve performance. And I am not a gram shaver.
    > Was the shop manager misinformed about these chains?
    >
    > BC
    >


    They went to a 3-digit naming convention when the 9-speed chains got the
    bulged outer plates. The PC-951 replaced the PC-59, and lots of shops sell
    it for $20-30.

    Here's the lineup:
    http://www.sram.com/en/sram/mountain/chains/9speed
     
  3. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Thu, 30 Mar 2006 08:49:26 -0600, Hank Wirtz wrote:

    > BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:


    >> I was at the LBS to pick up a new chain yesterday. I wanted a SRAM PC59
    >> or 69 to replace the PC59 I had. The shop manager told me these chains
    >> had been discontinued. He sold me a PC971 (a higher-priced chain).


    >> I had fine shifting with the $20 PC59, can't imagine that a more
    >> expensive chain will improve performance. And I am not a gram shaver.
    >> Was the shop manager misinformed about these chains?


    Probably not. He just wants to sell you the most expensive one he can.

    > They went to a 3-digit naming convention when the 9-speed chains got the
    > bulged outer plates. The PC-951 replaced the PC-59, and lots of shops
    > sell it for $20-30.
    >
    > Here's the lineup:
    > http://www.sram.com/en/sram/mountain/chains/9speed


    I too have noticed the cheaper chains have disappeared. Now we're calling
    $20 cheap. Sheesh.

    The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it on
    the road easily.

    Matt O.
     
  4. BCDrums

    BCDrums Guest

    Matt O'Toole wrote:
    > On Thu, 30 Mar 2006 08:49:26 -0600, Hank Wirtz wrote:
    >
    >> BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:

    >
    >>> I was at the LBS to pick up a new chain yesterday. I wanted a SRAM PC59
    >>> or 69 to replace the PC59 I had. The shop manager told me these chains
    >>> had been discontinued. He sold me a PC971 (a higher-priced chain).

    >
    >>> I had fine shifting with the $20 PC59, can't imagine that a more
    >>> expensive chain will improve performance. And I am not a gram shaver.
    >>> Was the shop manager misinformed about these chains?

    >
    > Probably not. He just wants to sell you the most expensive one he can.
    >
    >> They went to a 3-digit naming convention when the 9-speed chains got the
    >> bulged outer plates. The PC-951 replaced the PC-59, and lots of shops
    >> sell it for $20-30.
    >>
    >> Here's the lineup:
    >> http://www.sram.com/en/sram/mountain/chains/9speed

    >
    > I too have noticed the cheaper chains have disappeared. Now we're calling
    > $20 cheap. Sheesh.
    >
    > The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    > be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    > breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it on
    > the road easily.
    >
    > Matt O.
    >


    So is there a chain with removable link for a 3x9 road bike that's good
    and inexpensive?

    BC
     
  5. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

  6. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

  7. BCDrums

    BCDrums Guest

    Hank Wirtz wrote:
    > Hank Wirtz <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> So is there a chain with removable link for a 3x9 road bike that's
    >>> good and inexpensive?

    >>
    >> KMC Z9000, $15 at Nashbar.
    >>
    >> http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=12653
    >>

    >
    > Better yet, get the "recumbent" version, also $15. Cut it in half, voila, 2
    > chains.
    >
    > http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=12654

    Hank, have you used this chain?

    BC
     
  8. > The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    > be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    > breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it on
    > the road easily.
    >
    > Matt O.


    In a pinch, a standard chain tool can still be used to push out (and back in
    place) pins in a chain with "bulging" side plates, such as a Shimano and,
    presumably, the new SRAM units. It's not ideal, but it should hold for as
    long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper replacement
    pins.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  9. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Hank Wirtz wrote:
    >> Hank Wirtz <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>> news:[email protected]:
    >>>
    >>>> So is there a chain with removable link for a 3x9 road bike that's
    >>>> good and inexpensive?
    >>>
    >>> KMC Z9000, $15 at Nashbar.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=12653
    >>>

    >>
    >> Better yet, get the "recumbent" version, also $15. Cut it in half,
    >> voila, 2 chains.
    >>
    >> http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=12654

    > Hank, have you used this chain?
    >
    > BC
    >


    I've not, but I've heard good things about it, mostly that it's about on
    par with Sram's mid-range stuff for much less money.

    I've mostly got Srams, because I still think of them as Sedisport.
     
  10. BCDrums wrote:
    > I was at the LBS to pick up a new chain yesterday. I wanted a SRAM PC59
    > or 69 to replace the PC59 I had. The shop manager told me these chains
    > had been discontinued. He sold me a PC971 (a higher-priced chain).
    >
    > I had fine shifting with the $20 PC59, can't imagine that a more
    > expensive chain will improve performance. And I am not a gram shaver.
    > Was the shop manager misinformed about these chains?
    >
    > BC


    PC-951-same price as the PC-59...yer bike shop needs to do some
    research.
     
  11. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > > The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    > > be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    > > breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it on
    > > the road easily.
    > >
    > > Matt O.

    >
    > In a pinch, a standard chain tool can still be used to push out (and back in
    > place) pins in a chain with "bulging" side plates, such as a Shimano and,
    > presumably, the new SRAM units. It's not ideal, but it should hold for as
    > long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper replacement
    > pins.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    to break a chain there is huge!

    It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.
     
  12. On Thu, 30 Mar 2006 09:59:45 -0500, Matt O'Toole
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    >be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    >breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it on
    >the road easily.


    Are there *any* 9 speed chains with conventional pins?

    Jasper
     
  13. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > Are there *any* 9 speed chains with conventional pins?


    Campy C9?

    That's just a guess, but they don't have a master link and don't market any
    replacement pins.
     
  14. Lou Holtman

    Lou Holtman Guest

  15. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Fri, 31 Mar 2006 05:21:38 +0000, Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

    > In a pinch, a standard chain tool can still be used to push out (and back in
    > place) pins in a chain with "bulging" side plates, such as a Shimano and,
    > presumably, the new SRAM units. It's not ideal, but it should hold for as
    > long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper replacement
    > pins.


    That's what I'm talking about, getting home in a pinch. With some of
    these new chains you can't even do this without destroying the
    side plates. The peening is too heavy and the side plates bend and crack.
    The cheaper 9sp chains are OK, but no one sells them anymore.

    Matt O.
     
  16. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Thu, 30 Mar 2006 11:59:19 -0500, BCDrums wrote:

    > So is there a chain with removable link for a 3x9 road bike that's good
    > and inexpensive?


    Sure, but no one will sell it to you. They're holding out to sell you a
    $30 one.

    Matt O.
     
  17. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Thu, 30 Mar 2006 11:13:17 -0600, Hank Wirtz wrote:

    > Hank Wirtz <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> BCDrums <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>
    >>> So is there a chain with removable link for a 3x9 road bike that's
    >>> good and inexpensive?

    >>
    >>
    >> KMC Z9000, $15 at Nashbar.
    >>
    >> http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=12653
    >>
    >>

    > Better yet, get the "recumbent" version, also $15. Cut it in half,
    > voila, 2 chains.
    >
    > http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=12654



    Great, I'll give it a try!

    In the past I've had poor luck with KMC chains, with loose and tight
    links. It took awhile to go through the whole chain and get all the links
    working smoothly. Not this model though.

    I've also been using Shimano chains with KMC master links. Because
    everyone wants SRAM, Shimano chains are often on sale. KMC master links
    are only $2 and are reusable. Unless you break a chain on the road
    (rare), there's no reason to mess with Shimano's fussy pins.

    Matt O.
     
  18. > The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    > to break a chain there is huge!
    >
    > It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    > itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.


    If you're on the trail and your chain fails, and you have no extra pin, it's
    a better idea than pushing your bike back home. We're not talking about
    pushing the disposable connecting pin out, but rather one of the standard
    pins used everywhere else in the chain. Yes, it will mushroom the link a
    bit, and yes, it is nowhere near as strong, and yes, it will fail down the
    road. But in all likelihood it will get you home.

    I've never broken a chain on the road (or trail), ever. But I have done
    emergency repairs for a number of people who have.

    Perhaps I should have worded differently the part where I said "it should
    hold for as long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper
    replacement pins." I should have said it should hold until you get home,
    period, at which point you replace the chain.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >> > The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    >> > be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    >> > breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it
    >> > on
    >> > the road easily.
    >> >
    >> > Matt O.

    >>
    >> In a pinch, a standard chain tool can still be used to push out (and back
    >> in
    >> place) pins in a chain with "bulging" side plates, such as a Shimano and,
    >> presumably, the new SRAM units. It's not ideal, but it should hold for as
    >> long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper
    >> replacement
    >> pins.
    >>
    >> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    >> www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    >
    > The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    > to break a chain there is huge!
    >
    > It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    > itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.
    >
     
  19. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > > The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    > > to break a chain there is huge!
    > >
    > > It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    > > itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.

    >
    > If you're on the trail and your chain fails, and you have no extra pin, it's
    > a better idea than pushing your bike back home. We're not talking about
    > pushing the disposable connecting pin out, but rather one of the standard
    > pins used everywhere else in the chain. Yes, it will mushroom the link a
    > bit, and yes, it is nowhere near as strong, and yes, it will fail down the
    > road. But in all likelihood it will get you home.
    >
    > I've never broken a chain on the road (or trail), ever. But I have done
    > emergency repairs for a number of people who have.
    >
    > Perhaps I should have worded differently the part where I said "it should
    > hold for as long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper
    > replacement pins." I should have said it should hold until you get home,
    > period, at which point you replace the chain.


    Yep, didn't get that you were talking about an emergency repair. I have
    never broken a chain either but we sell many snap links for people to
    carry with them. Sram for 8s and 9s, Wipperman for 10s.


    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    >
    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > >> > The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    > >> > be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    > >> > breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair it
    > >> > on
    > >> > the road easily.
    > >> >
    > >> > Matt O.
    > >>
    > >> In a pinch, a standard chain tool can still be used to push out (and back
    > >> in
    > >> place) pins in a chain with "bulging" side plates, such as a Shimano and,
    > >> presumably, the new SRAM units. It's not ideal, but it should hold for as
    > >> long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper
    > >> replacement
    > >> pins.
    > >>
    > >> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > >> www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    > >
    > > The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    > > to break a chain there is huge!
    > >
    > > It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    > > itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.
    > >
     
  20. >> Perhaps I should have worded differently the part where I said "it should
    >> hold for as long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the
    >> proper
    >> replacement pins." I should have said it should hold until you get home,
    >> period, at which point you replace the chain.

    >
    > Yep, didn't get that you were talking about an emergency repair. I have
    > never broken a chain either but we sell many snap links for people to
    > carry with them. Sram for 8s and 9s, Wipperman for 10s.


    Peter: For what it's worth, last night I was thinking a snap link might be
    the greatest invention in the world. I was installing a new 10spd 7801 chain
    on my bike at home, in less-than-great light, with an adequate but not great
    chaintool, with my less-than-adequate 50-year-old eyes. Managed to push the
    pin too far through, wrecking the link I was working with. Had to splice
    more chain into it, so it now has two connecting pins.

    Under good working conditions, it's not a big deal properly installing one
    of those pins... but in my opinion, if it's not something an experienced guy
    like myself can't do blind-folded, then there's a problem. I'll bet a lot of
    10-speed consumer-installed (and many shop-installed too) Shimano chains are
    accidents waiting for a place to happen.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >> > The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    >> > to break a chain there is huge!
    >> >
    >> > It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    >> > itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.

    >>
    >> If you're on the trail and your chain fails, and you have no extra pin,
    >> it's
    >> a better idea than pushing your bike back home. We're not talking about
    >> pushing the disposable connecting pin out, but rather one of the standard
    >> pins used everywhere else in the chain. Yes, it will mushroom the link a
    >> bit, and yes, it is nowhere near as strong, and yes, it will fail down
    >> the
    >> road. But in all likelihood it will get you home.
    >>
    >> I've never broken a chain on the road (or trail), ever. But I have done
    >> emergency repairs for a number of people who have.
    >>
    >> Perhaps I should have worded differently the part where I said "it should
    >> hold for as long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the
    >> proper
    >> replacement pins." I should have said it should hold until you get home,
    >> period, at which point you replace the chain.

    >
    > Yep, didn't get that you were talking about an emergency repair. I have
    > never broken a chain either but we sell many snap links for people to
    > carry with them. Sram for 8s and 9s, Wipperman for 10s.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    >> www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >>
    >>
    >> "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >> >> > The more expensive ones are actually worse because the pins can't
    >> >> > be driven out or back in without destroying the side plates. Chain
    >> >> > breakage is rare, but when it happens it's nice to be able to repair
    >> >> > it
    >> >> > on
    >> >> > the road easily.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Matt O.
    >> >>
    >> >> In a pinch, a standard chain tool can still be used to push out (and
    >> >> back
    >> >> in
    >> >> place) pins in a chain with "bulging" side plates, such as a Shimano
    >> >> and,
    >> >> presumably, the new SRAM units. It's not ideal, but it should hold for
    >> >> as
    >> >> long as it takes to either replace the chain or get the proper
    >> >> replacement
    >> >> pins.
    >> >>
    >> >> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    >> >> www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >> >
    >> > The pin you push out and then back in is now deformed and the chances
    >> > to break a chain there is huge!
    >> >
    >> > It isn't the side plate, since that holds a new pin, but the pin
    >> > itself. i don't think i would recommend doing this.
    >> >

    >
     
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