Hydration

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by EuanB, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. HughMann wrote:

    > 1 Litre biddons are available from Toys R Us for $ 10, make sure that
    > the O ring is in the lid otherwise it will leak.


    I just use the large bottles of water you can buy everywhere with
    approriate cage. Carry 1, 2 or 3 extras into the front panniers
    (permanent mount for tools, chains, ball pein, etc.

    I stopped "buying" bidons when I found the above fitted, plus the $$$
    bidons either have irreplacable tube (not 5mm or 6mm), or fatigue on
    hinges/lids. now if I want a tube, a piece of 5mm tube, drill a hole
    and grommet does nicely through the top.

    You can also look at pop tops (if you like that sort of thing) from
    juice as some of these fit the large $$$ water.
     


  2. scotty72

    scotty72 New Member

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    You've obviously never ridden the M7 :)
     
  3. monsterman

    monsterman New Member

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    PHP:
    PHP:
    Abby you waaaaannkerrrrrrrr:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
     
  4. zog

    zog Guest

    Bleve wrote:
    >
    > I hate backpacks on bicycles (gets very hot & sweaty under them, YMMV),
    > and don't much care for warm drinks either.
    >


    not mad about backpacks either, but I can carry more water in the
    hydration pack, plus the bag is insulated, so no I don't get warm
    drinks, and you can always chuck some ice in the bladder seeing how most
    of them have a wide mouth filler.
     
  5. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    Didn't one of the TDF riders have to jump through a dozen hoops to prove that wearing a hydration pack *didn't* provide an aero benefit?
     
  6. dave

    dave Guest

    EuanB wrote:
    > Absent Husband Wrote:
    >
    >>And most importantly Euan, don't forget to wear lycra booties over your
    >>road shoes. The more aero flow over the shoe will compensate for the
    >>extra drag across the hydrapack...
    >>
    >>*giggles*
    >>

    >
    > Didn't one of the TDF riders have to jump through a dozen hoops to
    > prove that wearing a hydration pack *didn't* provide an aero benefit?
    >
    >


    Yeah

    and I personaly think it probably does.
    Probly doesnt make up for the sweaty back tho

    Dave
     
  7. To stop the bladder growing mould give it a rinse after use and toss it
    in the freezer. I use a 3L Camelbak on my dirt bike and have used this
    method for 3 years now and haven't got any growth or had any problems
    with the bladder. I also use it on my road bike (although it's a bit
    big) and am surprised that more people are not using them. I have read
    that to hydrate properly you should take small sips every few minutes
    which is very hard to do with bottles. I have my eye on a 2L Camelbak
    Lobo which is very narrow, has a ventilated back, a couple of small
    pockets and should be better suited to road bike riding.
     
  8. cyclist2

    cyclist2 New Member

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    iv got the" adventure" 2lt hydration pack,[didnt break the bank, about $80] and has small pockets for valubles and keeps munchies cold.
    i also use filtered water where possible.
    cleaning the bladder with bicarb and lemon juice is the go if they get smelly
     
  9. Dancier

    Dancier New Member

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    I have the Deuter 3L pack with the features that Scotty lists above plus a little pocket at the back for energy bars or gel. I use it with my MTB, Road Bike and walking. It allows me to go on extended rides without worrying about water supply, sometimes I might only put a litre in it and other times it's filled to the brim. I find on hot days the water in the biddons get warm whereas the water in hydration pack stays cooler and if you really want it cool then you add ice.

    I used it on the Alpine this year with 2L of Gatorade and a bit of ice due to the extreme heat, it was refilled back at bright ready for the buffalo accent. I still had two biddons of water and these were used for drinking, cleaning my glasses and pouring water over my head when things got a bit hot. Under normal conditions 3 biddons would be more than enought for this ride given the support along the way. It actually worked to an advantage because one of the water stops ran out of water so people had to wait for resupply or continue on without water whereas I had lots of water. My main reason for using the hydration pack on the Alpine was I just wanted to drink cold energized water while riding up the hills rather than reaching down and getting a biddon full of warm/hot water.
     
  10. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    EuanB wrote:
    > So far the only con I'm hearing re: hydration pack is sweaty back
    > syndorme which I can definately deal with (MMDV ;-) )
    >
    > Any other cons?


    Here's my take on it. MTB riders, motorcyclists etc wear hydration
    packs because they have to. Riding a MTB on the sort of terrain it's
    designed for means not much chance to take hands off the bars to reach
    down and get bidons. Also, they tend to have compact frames, making
    the reach further and there's generally less room for bidons anyway.
    Further, MTB rides tend to be away from convenient refill stations
    (servos, shops etc don't tend to crop up on singletrack or fire roads
    much :) ).

    Roadies use bidons because they're easy to get at on a roady, easy to
    see how much is in there, cheap, easy to wash, when they do get manky
    it's no big deal to buy a few more (see cheap above), and most road
    rides include ample opportunity to refill with cool water etc. Roadies
    don't have to be so self sufficient in this way, so they don't have to
    have a bladder strapped to their backs, with annoying shoulder straps
    collecting sweat and getting stinky, sweaty back (yes, those mesh backs
    help, but you still get a lot sweatier under them than you do without
    one, I have one ....) etc.

    It's horses for courses. I have only ever once had an issue with
    running out of water, and that was on the '04 Melb- warnambool when the
    first feed station was a long way away and one of my teammates ran dry
    - so we had to share water, I gave him one of my bidons.. Now, try and
    share water with a hydro pack while racing :) Also, try and squirt
    yourself or a fellow rider with water, it's easy with a bidon, and
    non-trivial with a bladder - so you can't use them as extra cooling.
    Today (36 degrees around the edithvale velo at 9am!) a client & I were
    doing intervals, and a good squirt of water was much appreciated!

    Backpacks are not a new idea, they are sometimes a necessary evil.
     
  11. petulance

    petulance Guest

    Bleve wrote:
    > EuanB wrote:
    >
    >>So far the only con I'm hearing re: hydration pack is sweaty back
    >>syndorme which I can definately deal with (MMDV ;-) )
    >>
    >>Any other cons?

    >
    >
    > Here's my take on it. MTB riders, motorcyclists etc wear hydration
    > packs because they have to. Riding a MTB on the sort of terrain it's
    > designed for means not much chance to take hands off the bars to reach
    > down and get bidons. Also, they tend to have compact frames, making
    > the reach further and there's generally less room for bidons anyway.
    > Further, MTB rides tend to be away from convenient refill stations
    > (servos, shops etc don't tend to crop up on singletrack or fire roads
    > much :) ).


    Don't forget that MTB trails can get very muddy/dirty. You don't want to
    be drinking from a mud encrusted bidon then! A hydration pack solves
    that problem because the sprout is much higher up from the frame and is
    protected by an outer cap.
     
  12. Euan

    Euan Guest

    "Bleve" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Roadies use bidons because they're easy to get at on a roady, easy to
    > see how much is in there, cheap, easy to wash, when they do get manky
    > it's no big deal to buy a few more (see cheap above), and most road
    > rides include ample opportunity to refill with cool water etc.


    I hate stopping :)

    > Now, try and share water with a hydro pack while racing :)


    I'm talking about doing long rides, not racing.

    > Also, try and squirt yourself or a fellow rider with water


    IMO water squirted is water wasted. It does far more good inside than
    it'll do outside.

    I used a hydration pack on ATB and really appreciated that I only had to
    refill once. Other than a flat (dammit!) the only stop we had was the
    ferry ride. I like that.

    A 17L hydration pack's a bit much for most rides though.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  13. dave

    dave Guest

    Just sent suzie that video Euan :)

    OT I know
     
  14. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Euan wrote:
    > "Bleve" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > > Roadies use bidons because they're easy to get at on a roady, easy to
    > > see how much is in there, cheap, easy to wash, when they do get manky
    > > it's no big deal to buy a few more (see cheap above), and most road
    > > rides include ample opportunity to refill with cool water etc.

    >
    > I hate stopping :)


    The difference between a red light and a refil at a servo is maybe 60
    seconds. I hate wearing backpacks :)

    > > Now, try and share water with a hydro pack while racing :)

    >
    > I'm talking about doing long rides, not racing.


    Same thing applies, you can't readily share water with hydropacks. You
    may not need to if everyone else also has them, of course.

    > > Also, try and squirt yourself or a fellow rider with water

    >
    > IMO water squirted is water wasted. It does far more good inside than
    > it'll do outside.


    Opinon noted, and dismissed with gusto. You can only drink ~1l an
    hour, you sweat more than you can drink in the heat (or at least, more
    than you can safely absorb, it's dangerous to drink too much,
    electrolyte imbalances are not fun, they've been known to kill people).

    But .. you can help your body cool by pouring water over a jersey and
    knicks, augmenting your sweat (which again, is limited by your body's
    sustainable rate of perspiration). Evaporation (phase change) is a
    *very* effective cooling mechanism, much (orders of magnitude) greater
    than drinking a slug of water that will be pretty close to ambient temp
    anyway, and it's very effective on a bike.. All that lovely moving, hot
    dry air pulls joules out of your skin at a great rate.

    > I used a hydration pack on ATB and really appreciated that I only had to
    > refill once. Other than a flat (dammit!) the only stop we had was the
    > ferry ride. I like that.


    That's fine, you like hydro packs, and they make you happy, that's
    good. How many red lights did you stop for? :)

    > A 17L hydration pack's a bit much for most rides though.


    17kg ... urgh. That's almost as heavy as most MTB's!
     
  15. On 25 Jan 2006 17:40:13 -0800, Bleve wrote:

    > Roadies use bidons because they're easy to get at on a roady, easy to
    > see how much is in there, cheap, easy to wash, when they do get manky
    > it's no big deal to buy a few more (see cheap above)


    I get them free from my domestiques and toss them to my adoring fans
    along the course :)

    (Several unfortunate injuiries caused by full ones are currently the
    subject of lawsuits.)

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  16. HughMann

    HughMann New Member

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  17. Euan

    Euan Guest

    "Bleve" <[email protected]> writes:

    >> IMO water squirted is water wasted. It does far more good inside than
    >> it'll do outside.

    >
    > Opinon noted, and dismissed with gusto. You can only drink ~1l an
    > hour, you sweat more than you can drink in the heat (or at least, more
    > than you can safely absorb, it's dangerous to drink too much,
    > electrolyte imbalances are not fun, they've been known to kill people).
    >
    > But .. you can help your body cool by pouring water over a jersey and
    > knicks, augmenting your sweat (which again, is limited by your body's
    > sustainable rate of perspiration). Evaporation (phase change) is a
    > *very* effective cooling mechanism, much (orders of magnitude) greater
    > than drinking a slug of water that will be pretty close to ambient temp
    > anyway, and it's very effective on a bike.. All that lovely moving, hot
    > dry air pulls joules out of your skin at a great rate.


    That's what I really love about the Rock Lobster tops from Ground
    Effect. They're a bit counter intuitive as they're long sleeved, great
    for keeping the sun off the arms.

    Anyway they soak up the sweat nicely and provide pretty good cooling
    compared to other tops I've worn in the heat.

    >> I used a hydration pack on ATB and really appreciated that I only had to
    >> refill once. Other than a flat (dammit!) the only stop we had was the
    >> ferry ride. I like that.

    >
    > That's fine, you like hydro packs, and they make you happy, that's
    > good. How many red lights did you stop for? :)


    Every one of course, now if only there were water taps available at all
    red lights we'd both be happy ;-)
    >> A 17L hydration pack's a bit much for most rides though.

    >
    > 17kg ... urgh. That's almost as heavy as most MTB's!


    17L backpack, 3L bladder. With camera, food and other assorted sundries
    it came in at about 6kg
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  18. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    HughMann wrote:
    > Bleve
    >
    > Snip Opinon noted, and dismissed with gusto. You can only drink ~1l an hour, you sweat more than you can drink in the heat (or at least, more than you can safely absorb, it's dangerous to drink too much, electrolyte imbalances are not fun, they've been known to kill people).
    >
    > [/QUOTE Wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > Beg to differ, you can drink much more than 1 lt an hour with
    > > absolutely no ill effect BUT the intake of electrolytes must be in
    > > balance with the electrolytes lost and the volume of water being
    > > ingested. ( its partly why they give IV saline (0.9% sodium chloride)
    > > to sick/injured and not IV water)


    You can drink it, but can you absorb it? I don't have time today to
    track down the paper I read on it, but will try and do so over the
    w'end and provide it here.



    > > Its good advice to exercise caution about excessive water but should go
    > > with advice on increasing salt intake in riding snacks.


    Definatly. This is why I suggest this to my riders :

    http://www.aboc.com.au/perl/tips.pl?p=drinking


    > >
    > > I agree that cold water down the back of the head is refreshing, if its
    > > available why not.


    It's not just refreshing, in hot. dry air it's very good at cooling.

    > > Never saw anyone share water in my years in Army, you want to drink -
    > > you carry it.
    > > Grunts Rule.


    This ain't the army, soldier :)
     
  19. jcjordan

    jcjordan New Member

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    Because they are really hot and uncomfortable on long rides; plus on a road bike they dont sit well while on the hoods.
     
  20. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    jcjordan wrote:
    >
    > EuanB Wrote:
    > > I'm going to be doing longer rides on the road bike and two bidons just
    > > isn't enough. I've got three options.
    > >
    > > Hydration pack, behind seat carrier (possible problems with under seat
    > > bag?) and stopping and refilling.
    > >
    > > I'm leaning very heavily towards a hydration pack. They're a lot more
    > > convenient to use than bidons, they're comfy and I can't see a reason
    > > NOT to use one.
    > >
    > > So why aren't more people using them? What am I missing?

    >
    > Because they are really hot and uncomfortable on long rides; plus on a
    > road bike they dont sit well while on the hoods.


    Wow, you must have a really shit hydration pack!

    Tam
     
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