Massive Gears

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by fondriest, Oct 4, 2004.

  1. fondriest

    fondriest New Member

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    Hi all,
    I just got myself a road bike after getting back in the saddle of a mountain bike about a year ago. Went for my first road ride yesturday and was shocked at how big the gears are (compared to mtb). I used to ride road bikes as a 15 - 16 year old and was hardley ever out of the 52 ring. So my question is, whats the best training method to get used to these big gears?
     
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  2. Fat Hack

    Fat Hack New Member

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    You don't have to grind away on the big gears just because they are there :) .

    Most "roadies" settle on a pedaling rate the they like, which is anywhere from 80 to 100rpm, then will choose the gear that accomodates. If you see a roadie on their own, they will most likely be "spinning" a low to moderate gear.

    It's unlikely to see a roadie grinding away in a 53/13 or 53/12 unless the conditions dictate that these gears will have them pedaling at their prefered revs, such as a strong tail wind, a race, or a fast group ride, etc.
     
  3. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    When you hit a downhill, you need those big gears if you still want to work. I regulary spin out my 53x12 on downhills, at above 50mph.

    And I have been in those big gears during a race, for the majority of the time.

    Road is a lot faster than mtn biking.
     
  4. fondriest

    fondriest New Member

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    Point (or points taken) but surely the only way to increase my avg speed is to gradually use bigger and bigger gears. So does anyone have any advice on ways to get the power and endurance in my legs to use these bigger gears, wether it be on or off the bike?
     
  5. closesupport

    closesupport Banned

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    stay on the top ring stay around 53x17 as you get comfortable with that drop the gear. i usually spin in around 53x15 and mash out the larger gears once i get up to speed, i find this an easier method of accelerating and maintainence of speed dropping to the 15 when i need to spin to pick up speed again, and then start the process over, when i'm on the mtb i find that i spend alot of my time spinning, but the majority of the time grinding out the 12, which seems pretty much the same as 12 on the roadbike thankfully my legs don't seem to spin quite as quick on the roadie..
     
  6. Fat Hack

    Fat Hack New Member

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    What gears are you using at the moment?

    Weight training can obviously enhance your strength, but I think most would agree that the vast majority of your training should be done on the bike. Cycling is a unique combination of strength, power, speed, and aerobic & anaerobic conditioning that is difficult to emulate elsewhere (well...maybe ice-skating :) ).

    You obviously have to work up to the larger gears, but don't be grinding away at 60 or 70 rpm on gears that you aren't ready for. You will still be gaining strengthand power, etc, if you are working hard on lower gears at the "correct" revs (80 to 100). There are obvioudly no "rules" regarding rpm, but most riders have succeeded on revs great than 80 per/min. Perhaps incorporate some hill work.


    Try to calculate the revs you can susatin at the moment for any given gear, then get back to us.
     
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