Mountain Bikers Don't Like to Stop!



M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
stopping?!

Mike


Thu, 7 Jun 2007:
From: stripes <[email protected]>
To: Josh <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [Touchy Feely] Mutual admiration personal accomplishment
congratulations
Thanks for doing this Josh :)

Tonight I cleaned the Seven Springs loop, counterclockwise, down and
up.
I've never linked them both before, but I was able to have some flow
tonight.

I'd like to make it from the Prospect parking lot to Hunter's point
without
stopping, but I can do it with only one stop. [What's the value of
never stopping?! Mike]

-Anne

On Wed, Jun 06, 2007 at 09:47:20PM -0700, Josh wrote:
> The idea of this thread is to post what you recently cleared / climbed
> / rode / did that you could not, or did not think you could do before.
> This is your chance to say what you did and get a pat on the back.
> Everyone is welcome to post their accomplishment and / or 'atta boy'.
>
> OK now, so we all now know that Paul can climb the loose churned up
> trails at RCDO. Congratulations Paul! that is quite an accomplishment!
> That is so cool! (I am not being sarcastic, BTW).
>
> When I first joined ROMP, for me it was a big deal to ride from the
> Prospect lot into Fremont Older and all the way to hunter's point.
> Later, it was riding up the back side from the dam without stopping.
> Last month, I cleared all of Dutches Trail for the first time. It is
> amazing to reflect on how far I have come.
>
> Now, what about you?

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
O

Olebiker

Guest
On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
> stopping?!


Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
nature.
 
B

Bill

Guest
Olebiker wrote:
> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>> stopping?!

>
> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
> nature.
>

That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
but react rather badly to a$$holes.
Bill Baka
 
M

Mike Romain

Guest
Bill wrote:
> Olebiker wrote:
>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>> stopping?!

>>
>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>> nature.
>>

> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
> Bill Baka


That is a 'competition' skill for trail bike riders on a course, you
lose points every time your foot touches the ground. It's also
dangerous to have a foot out because the foot peg can grab the back of
your leg and snap it or if a pedal, gouge the **** out of it or snap it.

At least 'that' rider isn't likely to stop and interfere with your
birdwatching...

Mike
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 11:29:14 -0700, Olebiker <[email protected]> wrote:

>On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>> stopping?!

>
>Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>nature.


I understand. They "enjoy nature" by not really seeing any of it.
Weird.
--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 19:06:59 GMT, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

>Olebiker wrote:
>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>> stopping?!

>>
>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>> nature.
>>

>That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>Bill Baka


Now you know what it's like to be a hiker around mountain bikers.
--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 16:05:58 -0400, Mike Romain <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Bill wrote:
>> Olebiker wrote:
>>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>>> stopping?!
>>>
>>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>>> nature.
>>>

>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>> Bill Baka

>
>That is a 'competition' skill for trail bike riders on a course, you
>lose points every time your foot touches the ground. It's also
>dangerous to have a foot out because the foot peg can grab the back of
>your leg and snap it or if a pedal, gouge the **** out of it or snap it.
>
>At least 'that' rider isn't likely to stop and interfere with your
>birdwatching...


If they aren't going to look at nature, they shouldn't be there. It's
not a human playground. It's wildlife habitat. Period.

>Mike

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
B

Bill

Guest
Mike Romain wrote:
> Bill wrote:
>> Olebiker wrote:
>>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>>> stopping?!
>>>
>>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>>> nature.
>>>

>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>> Bill Baka

>
> That is a 'competition' skill for trail bike riders on a course, you
> lose points every time your foot touches the ground. It's also
> dangerous to have a foot out because the foot peg can grab the back of
> your leg and snap it or if a pedal, gouge the **** out of it or snap it.
>
> At least 'that' rider isn't likely to stop and interfere with your
> birdwatching...
>
> Mike


It sounds like you are talking about the trail trials where you have to
navigate over logs, rocks, and whatever. I'm cool with that.
I just don't want some idiot to yell at me to get off **his** course.
That's about the point where I would clothesline somebody.
Like I said, I go to the mountains to chill out.
Waterfall, grass, and maybe a few birds and I'm good for the day.
As for the technical riding, I never could get it right, on a bicycle or
a motorcycle, and yesterday I saw a guy holding a track stand at a red
light. Dang showoff.
Bill Baka
 
S

Shawn

Guest
Bill wrote:

snip

yesterday I saw a guy holding a track stand at a red
> light. Dang showoff.


Not showing off, just too lazy to put a foot down :)


Shawn
 
B

Bill

Guest
Mike Vandeman wrote:
> On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 19:06:59 GMT, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Olebiker wrote:
>>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>>> stopping?!
>>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>>> nature.
>>>

>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>> Bill Baka

>
> Now you know what it's like to be a hiker around mountain bikers.


I think we have a definition discrepancy. Some of the places I ride you
really don't want to play daredevil or the next hiker will be the one
who finds the body. 20 miles out of cell phone range and not even space
for a helicopter is kind of a place to be careful.
If you do a yahoo, google, or mapquest of the area about 10-15 miles
east of Beale AFB and get the satellite image overlay you will see no
roads, no people, and very little flat land.
It's hard to find isolation in California, but there it is, for me.
Bill Baka
 
B

Bill

Guest
Mike Vandeman wrote:
> On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 16:05:58 -0400, Mike Romain <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> At least 'that' rider isn't likely to stop and interfere with your
>> birdwatching...

>
> If they aren't going to look at nature, they shouldn't be there. It's
> not a human playground. It's wildlife habitat. Period.
>
>> Mike


I'm with you pretty much. Low impact (on the environment) is what I do.
Bill Baka
 
B

Bill

Guest
Shawn wrote:
> Bill wrote:
>
> snip
>
> yesterday I saw a guy holding a track stand at a red
>> light. Dang showoff.

>
> Not showing off, just too lazy to put a foot down :)
>
>
> Shawn


I'll give you that one since he was clipped in.
Bill Baka
 
O

Olebiker

Guest
On Jun 7, 8:14 pm, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
> I understand. They "enjoy nature" by not really seeing any of it.
> Weird.


I believe you are confusing nature with wildlife. They are out there
to enjoy the challenging landscape created by the hills, rocks, and
trees. That's the nature they are enjoying.

**** Durbin
 
O

Olebiker

Guest
On Jun 7, 3:06 pm, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
> Bill Baka


So what gives you exclusive right to a trail? Do you own the land?

**** Durbin
 
B

Bill

Guest
Olebiker wrote:
> On Jun 7, 3:06 pm, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>> Bill Baka

>
> So what gives you exclusive right to a trail? Do you own the land?
>
> **** Durbin
>

No,
I just pay plenty of taxes and have actually found the families in
pickups at the downstream swimming hole to be a lot more friendly and
responsible. If I find somebody irresponsible and tearing up the land
telling me to get out of **his** way he may just get dropped by me for
his efforts at being an ass about it. When I am out enjoying a motor
free trail and the silence of the nature around me, that is what I want
to do, and that is within the guidelines for park use.
I get into enforcer mode sometimes a bit aggressively.
Sorry, but that's my temper coming up to the outraged mode.
You want to be somewhere else than in my face.
Bill Baka
 
C

Chris

Guest
Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> On Fri, 08 Jun 2007 01:05:23 GMT, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>Mike Vandeman wrote:
>>> On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 19:06:59 GMT, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Olebiker wrote:
>>>>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>>>>> stopping?!
>>>>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>>>>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to
>>>>> challenge themselves. When trying to complete a loop without
>>>>> dabbing, the rider is focused on the terrain and his technique.
>>>>> He does not go out for one of these rides to watch the wildlife.
>>>>> This is how he enjoys nature.
>>>>>
>>>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>>>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>>>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and
>>>> actually watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up
>>>> there and blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm
>>>> normally passive but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>>>> Bill Baka
>>>
>>> Now you know what it's like to be a hiker around mountain bikers.

>>
>>I think we have a definition discrepancy.

>
> You seem to be assuming that I am talking about bad behavior. That's
> why mountain bikers continue to fail to get it. It's the presence of
> bicycles we object to. When I am in a natural setting, I don't want to

^
"we" =======^

do you have a mouse in your pocket???

> see ANYTHING that reminds me of the city, since that's what I am
> trying to get AWAY from. DUH!
>
> Some of the places I ride you
>>really don't want to play daredevil or the next hiker will be the one
>>who finds the body. 20 miles out of cell phone range and not even
>>space for a helicopter is kind of a place to be careful.
>>If you do a yahoo, google, or mapquest of the area about 10-15 miles
>>east of Beale AFB and get the satellite image overlay you will see no
>>roads, no people, and very little flat land.
>>It's hard to find isolation in California, but there it is, for me.
>>Bill Baka



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Fri, 08 Jun 2007 01:05:23 GMT, Bill <[email protected]et> wrote:

>Mike Vandeman wrote:
>> On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 19:06:59 GMT, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>> Olebiker wrote:
>>>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>>>> stopping?!
>>>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>>>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>>>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>>>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>>>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>>>> nature.
>>>>
>>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>>> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>>> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>>> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>>> Bill Baka

>>
>> Now you know what it's like to be a hiker around mountain bikers.

>
>I think we have a definition discrepancy.


You seem to be assuming that I am talking about bad behavior. That's
why mountain bikers continue to fail to get it. It's the presence of
bicycles we object to. When I am in a natural setting, I don't want to
see ANYTHING that reminds me of the city, since that's what I am
trying to get AWAY from. DUH!

Some of the places I ride you
>really don't want to play daredevil or the next hiker will be the one
>who finds the body. 20 miles out of cell phone range and not even space
>for a helicopter is kind of a place to be careful.
>If you do a yahoo, google, or mapquest of the area about 10-15 miles
>east of Beale AFB and get the satellite image overlay you will see no
>roads, no people, and very little flat land.
>It's hard to find isolation in California, but there it is, for me.
>Bill Baka

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 17:49:55 -0700, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

>Mike Romain wrote:
>> Bill wrote:
>>> Olebiker wrote:
>>>> On Jun 7, 10:20 am, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>>> So much for "enjoying nature"! What's the big deal about never
>>>>> stopping?!
>>>>
>>>> Not stopping, or "dabbing", demonstrates your skill at handling
>>>> difficult terrain. It's one way that some riders like to challenge
>>>> themselves. When trying to complete a loop without dabbing, the rider
>>>> is focused on the terrain and his technique. He does not go out for
>>>> one of these rides to watch the wildlife. This is how he enjoys
>>>> nature.
>>>>
>>> That's the kind of idiot that gives them all a bad name.
>>> If he wants challenge maybe somebody could make a course on private
>>> property. I go out to get away from both SUVs and people and actually
>>> watch or interact with the wildlife. If some kid comes up there and
>>> blows my trip there could be blood on the trail. I'm normally passive
>>> but react rather badly to a$$holes.
>>> Bill Baka

>>
>> That is a 'competition' skill for trail bike riders on a course, you
>> lose points every time your foot touches the ground. It's also
>> dangerous to have a foot out because the foot peg can grab the back of
>> your leg and snap it or if a pedal, gouge the **** out of it or snap it.
>>
>> At least 'that' rider isn't likely to stop and interfere with your
>> birdwatching...
>>
>> Mike

>
>It sounds like you are talking about the trail trials where you have to
>navigate over logs, rocks, and whatever. I'm cool with that.
>I just don't want some idiot to yell at me to get off **his** course.
>That's about the point where I would clothesline somebody.


Violence is always close to the surface, isn't it? Do you work for the
military? Corrections? No wonder you need to chill out.

>Like I said, I go to the mountains to chill out.
>Waterfall, grass, and maybe a few birds and I'm good for the day.
>As for the technical riding, I never could get it right, on a bicycle or
>a motorcycle, and yesterday I saw a guy holding a track stand at a red
>light. Dang showoff.
>Bill Baka

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 19:03:28 -0600, Shawn <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Bill wrote:
>
>snip
>
>yesterday I saw a guy holding a track stand at a red
>> light. Dang showoff.

>
>Not showing off, just too lazy to put a foot down :)


No, I think it's an image thing. It's not macho to do what's easy and
natural (and safer), just put your foot down.

>Shawn

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande
 
M

Mike Vandeman

Guest
On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 19:32:28 -0700, Olebiker <[email protected]> wrote:

>On Jun 7, 8:14 pm, Mike Vandeman <[email protected]> wrote:
>> I understand. They "enjoy nature" by not really seeing any of it.
>> Weird.

>
>I believe you are confusing nature with wildlife. They are out there
>to enjoy the challenging landscape created by the hills, rocks, and
>trees. That's the nature they are enjoying.


Right: the challenge, period. Not anything that lives there and
depends on the habitat. We are saying the same thing. You can't
appreciate anything while you are trying to control your bike.

>**** Durbin

--
I am working on creating wildlife habitat that is off-limits to
humans ("pure habitat"). Want to help? (I spent the previous 8
years fighting auto dependence and road construction.)

Please don't put a cell phone next to any part of your body that you are fond of!

http://home.pacbell.net/mjvande