Need Recommendation on Bike for Wife

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by TMB Drum Alum, Jan 6, 2006.

  1. Hi all, I am looking for input on a bike for my wife. For the most
    part we do recreational rides, with one century a year. She currently
    rides a Trek 1000 fitted with a riser to bring up the bars. The
    problem is, she has neck/shoulder problems which makes me think perhaps
    a hybrid-type bike might be a better option. We had the bike fitted
    which resulted in adding the riser, which helped somewhat. I recently
    purschased a Trek 7200 for my daily commute (25 miles) and while it's
    not my 5500 (obviously) I was thinking this type of bike might help her
    enjoy riding more.
    For shorter rides (20-30 miles) the 1000 doesn't cause her any pain,
    but 30 miles or so into the century, her neck and shoulders "go out".
    I am thinking that even though a hybrid doesn't have the "cool factor"
    of a road bike for her, the tradeoff of a more upright position and a
    smoother ride would help her maintain a more constant pace and less
    pain.
    The added advantage to a hybrid is that she would have an everyday bike
    to ride around town on with the kids.
    Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, especially from Mike J.
    and other knowledgeable dealers.
     
    Tags:


  2. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    TMB Drum Alum wrote:
    > Hi all, I am looking for input on a bike for my wife. For the most
    > part we do recreational rides, with one century a year. She currently
    > rides a Trek 1000 fitted with a riser to bring up the bars. The
    > problem is, she has neck/shoulder problems which makes me think perhaps
    > a hybrid-type bike might be a better option. We had the bike fitted
    > which resulted in adding the riser, which helped somewhat. I recently
    > purschased a Trek 7200 for my daily commute (25 miles) and while it's
    > not my 5500 (obviously) I was thinking this type of bike might help her
    > enjoy riding more.
    > For shorter rides (20-30 miles) the 1000 doesn't cause her any pain,
    > but 30 miles or so into the century, her neck and shoulders "go out".
    > I am thinking that even though a hybrid doesn't have the "cool factor"
    > of a road bike for her, the tradeoff of a more upright position and a
    > smoother ride would help her maintain a more constant pace and less
    > pain.
    > The added advantage to a hybrid is that she would have an everyday bike
    > to ride around town on with the kids.
    > Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, especially from Mike J.
    > and other knowledgeable dealers.


    Depending on what you have now and her/your wild feelings about how far
    off the bike currently is from fitting her, a shorter stem in addition
    to the riser may do the trick. It also may not. One of my favorite
    bikes available right now is the Terry Classic. It would probably solve
    all her problems and is a great bike, but it's kinda pricey.
     
  3. > part we do recreational rides, with one century a year. She currently
    > rides a Trek 1000 fitted with a riser to bring up the bars. The
    > problem is, she has neck/shoulder problems which makes me think perhaps
    > a hybrid-type bike might be a better option. We had the bike fitted
    > which resulted in adding the riser, which helped somewhat. I recently
    > purschased a Trek 7200 for my daily commute (25 miles) and while it's
    > not my 5500 (obviously) I was thinking this type of bike might help her
    > enjoy riding more.
    > For shorter rides (20-30 miles) the 1000 doesn't cause her any pain,
    > but 30 miles or so into the century, her neck and shoulders "go out".
    > I am thinking that even though a hybrid doesn't have the "cool factor"
    > of a road bike for her, the tradeoff of a more upright position and a
    > smoother ride would help her maintain a more constant pace and less
    > pain.
    > The added advantage to a hybrid is that she would have an everyday bike
    > to ride around town on with the kids.
    > Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, especially from Mike J.
    > and other knowledgeable dealers.


    Is her current Trek 1000 a WSD model, which already has a shorter top tube
    than the guy's version? If not, then you might not have to leave the
    "road"-type bike behind. Combining the WSD (women specific design) with the
    Pilot (taller front end) style might get her what she needs. The advantages
    to road bikes on longer rides come from being able to move your hands around
    on the bars to alleviate pressure and improve comfort.

    Otherwise, if you've got to go really short (forward reach), Trek just came
    out with a WSD series for the hybrids. I believe the new 7.5FX is available
    in that style, and would give her something that has nice components and a
    fairly light weight (and doesn't ride like a cruiser).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  4. Steve W

    Steve W Guest

    what about one of these
    http://www.hpvelotechnik.com/produkte/spirit/index_e.html

    SW


    "TMB Drum Alum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all, I am looking for input on a bike for my wife. For the most
    > part we do recreational rides, with one century a year. She currently
    > rides a Trek 1000 fitted with a riser to bring up the bars. The
    > problem is, she has neck/shoulder problems which makes me think perhaps
    > a hybrid-type bike might be a better option. We had the bike fitted
    > which resulted in adding the riser, which helped somewhat. I recently
    > purschased a Trek 7200 for my daily commute (25 miles) and while it's
    > not my 5500 (obviously) I was thinking this type of bike might help her
    > enjoy riding more.
    > For shorter rides (20-30 miles) the 1000 doesn't cause her any pain,
    > but 30 miles or so into the century, her neck and shoulders "go out".
    > I am thinking that even though a hybrid doesn't have the "cool factor"
    > of a road bike for her, the tradeoff of a more upright position and a
    > smoother ride would help her maintain a more constant pace and less
    > pain.
    > The added advantage to a hybrid is that she would have an everyday bike
    > to ride around town on with the kids.
    > Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, especially from Mike J.
    > and other knowledgeable dealers.
    >
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    TMB Drum Alum wrote:

    > Hi all, I am looking for input on a bike for my wife. For the most
    > part we do recreational rides, with one century a year. She currently
    > rides a Trek 1000 fitted with a riser to bring up the bars. The
    > problem is, she has neck/shoulder problems which makes me think perhaps
    > a hybrid-type bike might be a better option. We had the bike fitted
    > which resulted in adding the riser, which helped somewhat. I recently
    > purschased a Trek 7200 for my daily commute (25 miles) and while it's
    > not my 5500 (obviously) I was thinking this type of bike might help her
    > enjoy riding more.
    > For shorter rides (20-30 miles) the 1000 doesn't cause her any pain,
    > but 30 miles or so into the century, her neck and shoulders "go out".
    > I am thinking that even though a hybrid doesn't have the "cool factor"
    > of a road bike for her, the tradeoff of a more upright position and a
    > smoother ride would help her maintain a more constant pace and less
    > pain.
    > The added advantage to a hybrid is that she would have an everyday bike
    > to ride around town on with the kids.
    > Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, especially from Mike J.
    > and other knowledgeable dealers.


    Women generally prefer a higher handlebar, all else being
    equal, and especially non -competitive -athletes will
    commonly ask for 2 or 3 inches above the saddle. We
    sometimes remove another shop's ultra short horizontal stem
    in favor of a horizontally longer but vertically much higher
    position. Disregard any comments about looking at the front
    hub over or under the stem. Bring that bar up until she's
    comfortable and don't forget to tip the bar up a bit so her
    fingers are in a straight line with her forearm. People
    with small hands are unable to shift modern Ergo/STi when
    the shift lever is angled low, especially STi front upshifts.
    That may require an adapter or a change to threaded fork-
    most modern bikes cannot otherwise be adjusted to a
    significant subset of riders.
    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  6. TMB Drum Alum wrote:
    > Hi all, I am looking for input on a bike for my wife....


    Post pictures of your wife and see what bikes are offered in trade. ;)

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
  7. Road Man

    Road Man Guest

    My wife loves her Breezer Liberty. For less than $1000 you get a
    mostly Shimano gruppo, a rather rigid aluminum frame with a long
    wheelbase and easy steering. She needed the hand positions closer to
    her to alleviate carpal tunnel symptoms, and I put on trekker-style
    bars. It also comes with fenders, a good generator/light set, 27
    speed gearing that Frank Berto would be proud of, an extremely
    well-fit luggage rack, and easy-to modulate V-brakes. I do think the
    effective top tube is a bit long, but the trekker bars help a lot.

    She would not adjust to a conventional road bike, although she liked
    the strong pedal response of a good steel framed lightweight.

    Ken Freeman


    "TMB Drum Alum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all, I am looking for input on a bike for my wife. For the most
    > part we do recreational rides, with one century a year. She
    > currently
    > rides a Trek 1000 fitted with a riser to bring up the bars. The
    > problem is, she has neck/shoulder problems which makes me think
    > perhaps
    > a hybrid-type bike might be a better option. We had the bike fitted
    > which resulted in adding the riser, which helped somewhat. I
    > recently
    > purschased a Trek 7200 for my daily commute (25 miles) and while
    > it's
    > not my 5500 (obviously) I was thinking this type of bike might help
    > her
    > enjoy riding more.
    > For shorter rides (20-30 miles) the 1000 doesn't cause her any pain,
    > but 30 miles or so into the century, her neck and shoulders "go
    > out".
    > I am thinking that even though a hybrid doesn't have the "cool
    > factor"
    > of a road bike for her, the tradeoff of a more upright position and
    > a
    > smoother ride would help her maintain a more constant pace and less
    > pain.
    > The added advantage to a hybrid is that she would have an everyday
    > bike
    > to ride around town on with the kids.
    > Any input on this would be greatly appreciated, especially from Mike
    > J.
    > and other knowledgeable dealers.
    >
     
  8. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    A Muzi wrote:
    >
    > That may require an adapter or a change to threaded fork-
    > most modern bikes cannot otherwise be adjusted to a
    > significant subset of riders.


    Please help me understand why a threaded fork-- or more specifically I
    imagine, a quill stem-- allows fit options unavailable to someone using
    a threadless fork. Is it just the option of a stem that's 6" tall or
    more but with only 2" of extension?

    I've done a lot of ridiculous things to threadless sytems to get the
    bars to a location the designers never anticipated, but admittedly all
    of these things involved some healthy amount of radial extension.

    Chalo Colina
     
  9. Mike/All... Thanks for the input, it's good to get an honest opinion
    from someone not directly involved in selling a bike :)
    She has the men's 1000, to be honest I don't remember the rationale for
    going that route other than the advice of the bike shop. We did have a
    riser installed to bring the bars up to a "comfortable" level. To me,
    putting a flat bar on the bike would have accomplished the same postion
    since she doesn't ride in the drops. The trick is getting her on
    anything other than a road bike. I put my 7200 on a trainer so she
    could sit on it to see if the change in position felt better (ignoring
    obvious fit issues), her first comment was "I don't want to look like a
    dork" :/ I told her she'd look like a bigger dork pushing a Madone
    uphill.
    I guess we will continue to evaluate the options since she wanted an
    "around town/fitness bike" as a second ride (since I have two, why
    doesn't she?)
    Thanks again
     
Loading...
Loading...