Nice mount for home made lights.

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Treadly, May 4, 2006.

  1. Treadly

    Treadly New Member

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    I found a good design for mounting Luxeons. It's a simple but neat design.
     
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  2. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 04/05/06 at 21:44:55 Treadly somehow managed to type:

    >
    > I found a 'good design'
    > (http://www.hyperactive.oz.nf/Lights4/Luxeon4.htm) for mounting
    > Luxeons. It's a simple but neat design.


    I've seen that one before - pretty neat. BUT. Last night while I was
    looking around for Luxeon lighting ideas [1] I stumbled across this
    http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectronics/LEDhead.htm

    [1] For the last month or so I've been messing around with PIC micros
    for another purpose and spotted a bike light thing spread over two
    issues of Silicon Chip mag - Apr and May 06 [3]. It's vastly
    over-the-top for straight bike lights what with a charging circuit,
    more "modes" than you can shake a stick at, need two of 'em (front and
    rear) etc. so I figured that I'd rat their design and make actual bike
    lights, front and rear drivers in one unit.

    For tail lights I reckon a couple of red 1W Luxeons - one flashing, one
    steady (mounted as far apart as possible) should do the job. For
    headlights I figured a 3W white luxeon for "low" beam and a 5W jobbie
    for "high" beam and both the 3W and 5W Luxeons on for a "super high"
    beam. All managed and driven by a PIC micro to get the last bit of
    usable charge from a power source of between about 5 and about 16 volts.

    Thoughts anyone.

    [2] http://www.microchip.com/

    [3] http://www.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_106372/article.html

    The question for Suzyj - or anyone else come to that. Do you have any
    recomendations for PCB layout software ? GPL for preference but cheap
    will do if it has to...:) Linux, doze or even OpenVMS is fine.

    --
    Humbug
     
  3. Treadly

    Treadly New Member

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    The problem with the Silicon Chip one is that not only is the design over the top, but the reliability of the circuit board too. The Luxeon pucks are sealed and I've only ever had one fail was when I connected the power up to it reverse polarity. I NEED reliability.
     
  4. slaw

    slaw New Member

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    I've been using reflector brackets for my homemade lights. They're pretty adaptable. Another sort of bracket I've used for rack mounting and map holder mounting is one that I got from a marine supply place (Elizabeth St, Mel). They're for mounting things to railings on boats so they can do a fair range of diameters. Strong nylon and two screws. About $9 a pair.

    Not sure about mixing Luxeon wattages. Since they need different currents you might need separate drivers for each type.
     
  5. Humbug wrote:
    > The question for Suzyj - or anyone else come to that. Do you have any
    > recomendations for PCB layout software ? GPL for preference but cheap
    > will do if it has to...:) Linux, doze or even OpenVMS is fine.


    Suzy's praises are being sung on
    http://www.hackaday.com/entry/1234000273073676/ There's the odd bit of
    leching going on too :)

    Graeme
     
  6. slaw wrote:
    > I've been using reflector brackets for my homemade lights. They're
    > pretty adaptable.


    How reliable do you find these?
    what sort of load does it take to twist them around the bars?

    > Another sort of bracket I've used for rack mounting
    > and map holder mounting is one that I got from a marine supply place
    > (Elizabeth St, Mel). They're for mounting things to railings on boats
    > so they can do a fair range of diameters. Strong nylon and two screws.
    > About $9 a pair.


    Good tip. Thanks.
     
  7. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 05/05/06 at 07:07:31 Treadly somehow managed to type:

    <snip>

    > The problem with the Silicon Chip one is that not only is the
    > design over the top, but the reliability of the circuit board too.
    > The Luxeon pucks are sealed and I've only ever had one fail was when I
    > connected the power up to it reverse polarity. I NEED reliability.


    I can't see why a well put together controller would be any less
    reliable than the Luxeon pucks. A well designed controller would've had
    reverse polarity protection built in.


    --
    Humbug
     
  8. On 2006-05-05, Humbug <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 05/05/06 at 07:07:31 Treadly somehow managed to type:
    >> The problem with the Silicon Chip one is that not only is the
    >> design over the top, but the reliability of the circuit board too.
    >> The Luxeon pucks are sealed and I've only ever had one fail was when I
    >> connected the power up to it reverse polarity. I NEED reliability.

    >
    > I can't see why a well put together controller would be any less
    > reliable than the Luxeon pucks. A well designed controller would've had
    > reverse polarity protection built in.


    Indeed. Diodes are dirt cheap; sure, you lose a little power (0.7V drop,
    IIRC), but if you're going to blow out the entire board if somebody does
    the wrong thing, it's well worth the cost.

    I'm reminded of the tale of a guy who was designing systems to be
    installed by drongos out in the middle of nowhere. The first lot was
    wired up with reverse polarity, so the next revision had the terminals
    shaped: positive was a square; negative a circle. The second lot was
    wired up with reverse polarity: they'd hammered the connectors to fit
    the wrong terminals. I seem to remember that there were a couple of
    other similar instances before they finally built in a bridge rectifier,
    and accepted the 1.4V drop in available voltage.

    --
    My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
    the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".
     
  9. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 05/05/06 at 14:20:23 Stuart Lamble somehow managed to type:

    <snip>

    >
    > I'm reminded of the tale of a guy who was designing systems to be
    > installed by drongos out in the middle of nowhere. The first lot was
    > wired up with reverse polarity, so the next revision had the terminals
    > shaped: positive was a square; negative a circle. The second lot was
    > wired up with reverse polarity: they'd hammered the connectors to fit
    > the wrong terminals.


    As someone once said - "never underestimate the power of human
    stupidity". The biggest bang I've seen was at the RA transmitter site
    at Shep. Someone (NOT ME) tried (accidently) to see how low the
    impedence of a 22KV line was by switching a BIG genset in out of phase.
    The gen stopped and the big ex-ship diesel flung itself off its
    mountings. BIG BANG followed by SILENCE. The answer to the impedance
    question is VERY bloody low indeed...:)

    You can save the voltage drop by putting a fast blow fuse between the
    power supply and the equipment. The first thing AFTER the fuse is a
    hefty diode connected across the supply rails. Connect it up the wrong
    way and the diode conducts and kills the fuse - hopefully before any
    damage is done.

    --
    Humbug
     
  10. Jaycar have a LED driver Kit for Luxeons which is a lot simpler, it drives
    up to a 5W from a 12v supply with low battery cutout so you don't damage
    your batteries.
    I think it was Silicon Chip Nov 2004.

    If you look at the latest article you will see they use a ex CPU heatsink to
    cool the Luxeon. so keep that in mind when developing your setup. The older
    article goes a little way to explaining how the choice of heatsink was done.
    It also used a CPU heatsink. The article basically said the CPU heatsink was
    marginal. but a moving bicycle should provide some airflow in the absence of
    a fan.

    It also discusses the option of driving a 3w LUXEON at 700ma instead of
    1000mA to extend the life and decrease the intensity falloff due to running
    near max output. Still 20 000 hour is probably enough but 50% reduction in
    intensity is probably not and would be the limiting factor.

    I am going to try the simpler circuit out with a single 3W LUXEON.

    Wilfred
    "Humbug" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 04/05/06 at 21:44:55 Treadly somehow managed to type:
    >
    >>
    >> I found a 'good design'
    >> (http://www.hyperactive.oz.nf/Lights4/Luxeon4.htm) for mounting
    >> Luxeons. It's a simple but neat design.

    >
    > I've seen that one before - pretty neat. BUT. Last night while I was
    > looking around for Luxeon lighting ideas [1] I stumbled across this
    > http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectronics/LEDhead.htm
    >
    > [1] For the last month or so I've been messing around with PIC micros
    > for another purpose and spotted a bike light thing spread over two
    > issues of Silicon Chip mag - Apr and May 06 [3]. It's vastly
    > over-the-top for straight bike lights what with a charging circuit,
    > more "modes" than you can shake a stick at, need two of 'em (front and
    > rear) etc. so I figured that I'd rat their design and make actual bike
    > lights, front and rear drivers in one unit.
    >
    > For tail lights I reckon a couple of red 1W Luxeons - one flashing, one
    > steady (mounted as far apart as possible) should do the job. For
    > headlights I figured a 3W white luxeon for "low" beam and a 5W jobbie
    > for "high" beam and both the 3W and 5W Luxeons on for a "super high"
    > beam. All managed and driven by a PIC micro to get the last bit of
    > usable charge from a power source of between about 5 and about 16 volts.
    >
    > Thoughts anyone.
    >
    > [2] http://www.microchip.com/
    >
    > [3] http://www.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_106372/article.html
    >
    > The question for Suzyj - or anyone else come to that. Do you have any
    > recomendations for PCB layout software ? GPL for preference but cheap
    > will do if it has to...:) Linux, doze or even OpenVMS is fine.
    >
    > --
    > Humbug
     
  11. Friday

    Friday Guest

    Humbug wrote:
    > On 05/05/06 at 07:07:31 Treadly somehow managed to type:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>The problem with the Silicon Chip one is that not only is the
    >>design over the top, but the reliability of the circuit board too.
    >>The Luxeon pucks are sealed and I've only ever had one fail was when I
    >>connected the power up to it reverse polarity. I NEED reliability.

    >
    >
    > I can't see why a well put together controller would be any less
    > reliable than the Luxeon pucks. A well designed controller would've had
    > reverse polarity protection built in.
    >
    >


    I think for a road bike it might be ok but for a mountain bike it would
    be too fragile.
     
  12. Friday

    Friday Guest

    Humbug wrote:
    > On 05/05/06 at 14:20:23 Stuart Lamble somehow managed to type:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>I'm reminded of the tale of a guy who was designing systems to be
    >>installed by drongos out in the middle of nowhere. The first lot was
    >>wired up with reverse polarity, so the next revision had the terminals
    >>shaped: positive was a square; negative a circle. The second lot was
    >>wired up with reverse polarity: they'd hammered the connectors to fit
    >>the wrong terminals.

    >
    >
    > As someone once said - "never underestimate the power of human
    > stupidity". The biggest bang I've seen was at the RA transmitter site
    > at Shep. Someone (NOT ME) tried (accidently) to see how low the
    > impedence of a 22KV line was by switching a BIG genset in out of phase.
    > The gen stopped and the big ex-ship diesel flung itself off its
    > mountings. BIG BANG followed by SILENCE. The answer to the impedance
    > question is VERY bloody low indeed...:)
    >
    > You can save the voltage drop by putting a fast blow fuse between the
    > power supply and the equipment. The first thing AFTER the fuse is a
    > hefty diode connected across the supply rails. Connect it up the wrong
    > way and the diode conducts and kills the fuse - hopefully before any
    > damage is done.
    >


    That sounds like the best option. The problem has since been solved by
    polarising the plugs. At the time I was just lazy and assumed the inputs
    were protected, as are the outputs.

    We did have a situation where we synchronised a 200 megawatt
    generator not remembering the grid was disconnected and the output
    phases earthed. I wasn't there at the time but it left huge burn marks
    on the wall which had to be repainted, an area about 10 by 10 metres
    where the busbars went through.
     
  13. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Fri, 05 May 2006 10:36:52 +0000, Friday wrote:

    > I think for a road bike it might be ok but for a mountain bike it would
    > be too fragile.


    Bollocks. If anything has a significant mass and is likely to vibrate
    loose it can be potted. One of my quick and nasty methods to secure stuff
    is to just chuck a (small) board and components in heat shrink. Even a
    well soldered component will normally be OK, but a bit of mechanical
    relief is a good idea.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "If you're bored, find something and break it" Jamie Rapson - 1996
     
  14. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 05/05/06 at 20:36:52 Friday somehow managed to type:

    <snip>

    >
    > I think for a road bike it might be ok but for a mountain bike it
    > would be too fragile.


    A good quality PCB (not hard to make at home), bit of care in assembly
    and the PCB mounted in a solid box and it'll be OK. Still doubtfull -
    pot it.

    --

    Humbug
    Today is Setting Orange, the 52nd day of Discord in the YOLD 3172
     
  15. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 05/05/06 at 18:06:02 Wilfred Kazoks somehow managed to type:

    > Jaycar have a LED driver Kit for Luxeons which is a lot simpler, it
    > drives up to a 5W from a 12v supply with low battery cutout so you
    > don't damage your batteries. I think it was Silicon Chip Nov 2004.


    Yeah but at Jaycar prices...:-( Those kits are around $30 EACH so for a
    four LED system thats $~120 + LEDs = EXPENSIVE. I reckon I could build
    my proposed system for less than about $50 + LEDs. STREWTH !!! - I've
    just had look at the price (rather than just availability) of Luxeons
    at Jaycar. Red 1W = $14.95 each, white 3W = $29.95 and white 5W =
    $69.95. That's a lot of dollars for not a lot of LEDs.
    >
    > If you look at the latest article you will see they use a ex CPU
    > heatsink to cool the Luxeon. so keep that in mind when developing
    > your setup. The older article goes a little way to explaining how the


    Getting rid of the heat shouldn't be too much of a problem. The real
    problem, for me anyway, is going to be the code for whatever micro I
    use - I'm leaning a bit towards something from the ATmega series ATM. I
    need to do a bit of data sheet reading methinks.

    <snip>

    --

    Humbug
    Today is Setting Orange, the 52nd day of Discord in the YOLD 3172
     
  16. Friday wrote:
    > Humbug wrote:
    >
    >> On 05/05/06 at 07:07:31 Treadly somehow managed to type:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> The problem with the Silicon Chip one is that not only is the
    >>> design over the top, but the reliability of the circuit board too.
    >>> The Luxeon pucks are sealed and I've only ever had one fail was when I
    >>> connected the power up to it reverse polarity. I NEED reliability.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I can't see why a well put together controller would be any less
    >> reliable than the Luxeon pucks. A well designed controller would've had
    >> reverse polarity protection built in.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I think for a road bike it might be ok but for a mountain bike it would
    > be too fragile.

    I've made simple dc-dc converters for use with Li-ion batteris and
    halogen lights on vero board. I've never had any reliablity issue and I
    do 4 or 5 24 hour mtb races each year plus riding weekly at night during
    the winter months.
     
  17. "Humbug" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Yeah but at Jaycar prices...:-( Those kits are around $30 EACH so for a
    > four LED system thats $~120 + LEDs = EXPENSIVE. I reckon I could build
    > my proposed system for less than about $50 + LEDs. STREWTH !!! - I've
    > just had look at the price (rather than just availability) of Luxeons
    > at Jaycar. Red 1W = $14.95 each, white 3W = $29.95 and white 5W =
    > $69.95. That's a lot of dollars for not a lot of LEDs.



    Yes a 4 LED system would be a lot of $$'s.

    The Jaycar kit does drive a pair of 1W or 3W LEDs so that isn't as bad as 4
    kits.

    Wilfred
     
  18. Humbug wrote:

    > Yeah but at Jaycar prices...:-( Those kits are around $30 EACH so for a
    > four LED system thats $~120 + LEDs = EXPENSIVE. I reckon I could build
    > my proposed system for less than about $50 + LEDs. STREWTH !!! - I've
    > just had look at the price (rather than just availability) of Luxeons
    > at Jaycar. Red 1W = $14.95 each, white 3W = $29.95 and white 5W =
    > $69.95. That's a lot of dollars for not a lot of LEDs.


    err, bulk buys and wrong supplier.
    If other melbournites are interested, you need to do a bulk buy from a
    related supplier.
     
  19. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    Humbug wrote:

    > The question for Suzyj - or anyone else come to that.
    > Do you have any recomendations for PCB layout
    > software ? GPL for preference but cheap will do if it has
    > to...:) Linux, doze or even OpenVMS is fine.

    I use Protel (called altium these days). I believe there's free versions of the earlier stuff kicking around the web. Maybe google Autotrax. It only runs on windows tho.

    I generally use BEC (www.becman.com) to manufacture PCBs. Mucking about with ferric chloride etc is a PITA, and getting nice double sided boards with plate throughs and solder masks are much better than dealing with single sided boards anyway.

    Best of luck,

    Suzy
     
  20. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    Graeme wrote:

    > There's the odd bit of leching going on too :)

    Geez. Some people should get out more.

    Cheers,

    Suzy
     
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