Packing stuff on a bloody bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by vernon levy, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. vernon levy

    vernon levy Guest


    >
    > Put the sleeping bag in a waterproof cover and bungee it to the top of the

    rack
    > to free-up pannier space?
    >

    I use the top of the rack for tent sleepingmat and sleeping bag leaving
    oodles of space for beer in the panniers ;-)
     
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  2. How do you multi week tourers do it then?

    Here I am cursing after having spent a couple of hours trying cram all
    my stuff onto my bike. And I'm only away for two nights. Someone else
    is bringing a tent and we're not taking food as we plan to live off
    pubs and cafes.

    I thought boats were small to live on but a bike is simply ridiculous.
    My toolkit and spares take up half a pannier, for God's sake. The
    sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one. That leaves me with half a
    pannier for for everything else.

    Looks like the 200 fags are being left behind.

    So if you see a nicotine deprived lunatic riding a bike one handed and
    with carrier bags dangled from the handlebars in the Peaks this
    weekend, that'll be me. Feel free to say hello and offer me a fag.

    Grrr.
     
  3. >The
    >sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one.


    Put the sleeping bag in a waterproof cover and bungee it to the top of the rack
    to free-up pannier space?


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  4. Kevin Stone

    Kevin Stone Guest

    >> My toolkit and spares

    I've got one of those all-in-one tool kits and I only ever take a spare
    inner tube (puncture free ones) - so that's loads of space freed up.

    >> sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one


    sleeping bag sits on top of everything else. the top bag of the pannier
    holds clothes, so the tent and sleeping bag squash it down nicely.

    which leaves almost two empty side panniers for the stove, etc.

    water is held in 2x1 litre supermarket pop bottles in the std water bottle
    carriers.

    loads of room!

    :)

    HTH

    --
    Kev







    .. That leaves me with half a
    > pannier for for everything else.
    >
    > Looks like the 200 fags are being left behind.
    >
    > So if you see a nicotine deprived lunatic riding a bike one handed and
    > with carrier bags dangled from the handlebars in the Peaks this
    > weekend, that'll be me. Feel free to say hello and offer me a fag.
    >
    > Grrr.
     
  5. chris French

    chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, "[Not
    Responding]" <[email protected]> writes
    >How do you multi week tourers do it then?
    >

    Actually, I take pretty much the same for 3 weeks as I do for one.

    >Here I am cursing after having spent a couple of hours trying cram all
    >my stuff onto my bike. And I'm only away for two nights. Someone else
    >is bringing a tent and we're not taking food as we plan to live off
    >pubs and cafes.
    >

    You are obviously taking to much stuff then............

    >I thought boats were small to live on but a bike is simply ridiculous.
    >My toolkit and spares take up half a pannier, for God's sake.


    What on earth are you carrying, a toolkit, a spare tube and a few minor
    spares should fit in a small seat pack, or pannier pocket. In mine I
    have a multi-tool (good old CoolTool) that has adjustable spanner Allen
    keys, chain tool and crank bolt socket on it., small flat head
    screwdriver, spoke key, small pair of needle nose pliers, tyre levers,
    patches, hand wipes. all firs into a small nylon roll. There's no point
    in carrying many spares, esp if the bike is properly maintained I have a
    gear/brake cable inners (never used) spare blocks, spare chainlink and
    oddments like zip ties, a few choice nuts and bolts, a bit of duct tape,
    insulation tape, a bit of nylon cord etc.- it is these latter bits that
    are usually most useful

    > The
    >sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one. That leaves me with half a
    >pannier for for everything else.


    sleeping bags can be a pain esp. if you don't have a nice lightweight
    compact down one. If it's that bulky bungee it on the rack at the back
    (I did my first tour - a month round Ireland with a sleeping bag like
    that - as well a kip mat as well.) Though all the rest of your kit
    should fit in a pannier anyway.

    You really don't need much stuff though, 2 sets of cycling clothes would
    be generous (shorts + top) windproof top, tracksters, fleece top,
    waterproof. + a change of trousers/top for camp. Small washkit (one of
    the modern microfibre packtowels is useful here, both for pack size and
    for speed of drying) - a torch - I would take a LED headtorch - light
    and compact, penknife, a bit of reading matter, metal/plastic cup/beaker
    for drinking wine or whatever. Map, Camera,
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  6. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

    Joined:
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    On my round the world ride I packed my sleeping bag in one pannier, clothes, towel etc in the other. My foam mat and half of the tent were over the rack. In my bar bag I had documents, spare tubes(2), spare cables and things I need for the day such as camera, watch, sunblock. Saddle wedge had my small tool kit.

    Read more on my website http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk/ try the Trans America Ride first.

    When I was travelling alone I fitted front low riders to take the rest of the tent and to spread the load better. My tent was a three man mountain tent (4.5kg), my sleeping bag was fairly large (2kg). My bet is that you have some just in case stuff - you will not need it and if you do you will learn to improvise anyway.
     
  7. [Not Responding] wrote:

    > How do you multi week tourers do it then?
    >
    > Here I am cursing after having spent a couple of hours trying cram all
    > my stuff onto my bike. And I'm only away for two nights. Someone else
    > is bringing a tent and we're not taking food as we plan to live off
    > pubs and cafes.


    See the pictures at:

    http://tranchant.plus.com/cycling/france-1996/ft1-2

    My bike's the one on the right. I have my floor mat and sleeping bag and
    the tent on top of my rack. Neil's carrying his mat and 'bag on his
    rack. These are held down with a pair of bungees.

    We carried everything we needed except food for a nine-day tour,
    including a camera, tools and a camping stove. Admittedly, we didn't
    have any heavy clothes as this was France in summer.

    The front panniers are excellent, but you shouldn't need them for a
    three-day ride.

    --
    Mark.
     
  8. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

    Joined:
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    One more point it is worth thinking about trying to make as many allen bolts and nuts on you and your companions' bikes as standard as possible. That way you'll need less tools. Uniglide cassettes can be removed without the use of a cassette tool. A hammer and screwdriver will do. These can be found everywhere so you will not need to carry one nor a cassette tool. BTW my tourer doesn't have Uniglide any longer but I am toying with the idea of refitting it for touring.
     
  9. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 23:24:12 +0100, "[Not Responding]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How do you multi week tourers do it then?
    >
    >Here I am cursing after having spent a couple of hours trying cram all
    >my stuff onto my bike. And I'm only away for two nights. Someone else
    >is bringing a tent and we're not taking food as we plan to live off
    >pubs and cafes.
    >
    >I thought boats were small to live on but a bike is simply ridiculous.
    >My toolkit and spares take up half a pannier, for God's sake. The
    >sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one. That leaves me with half a
    >pannier for for everything else.
    >
    >Looks like the 200 fags are being left behind.
    >
    >So if you see a nicotine deprived lunatic riding a bike one handed and
    >with carrier bags dangled from the handlebars in the Peaks this
    >weekend, that'll be me. Feel free to say hello and offer me a fag.


    For a two week tour:

    Front left pannier - spare clothing
    2 clean pants
    2 pairs socks
    2 T-Shirts
    Shorts
    Trousers
    Sweater
    Towel
    Wash bag
    Front right pannier - sleeping
    Hips and shoulders sleeping mat
    Sleeping bag
    Sandals
    Rear left pannier - wet bag
    3L Camelbak
    Waterproof
    Saucepan
    Stove
    Bowl
    Cup
    Stove fuel
    Rear right pannier - food bag
    Food
    First aid kit
    Helmet*
    Spare cycle shorts
    Spare cycle shirt
    On pannier
    Tent
    Saddle bag
    Tools
    Bar bag
    Valuables
    Maps
    Snacks
    On me
    Cycle shorts
    Cycle shirt
    Sealskin socks
    SPDs

    *Helmet is usually worn for descents and on busy roads. It is not
    usually worn for ascents.
     
  10. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    [Not Responding] <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I thought boats were small to live on but a bike is simply ridiculous.

    You need a completely different mindset, even to a (small) boat.

    Take less. Much less.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  11. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    On 23 Jul 2004 08:14:58 GMT, "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[Not Responding] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >: I thought boats were small to live on but a bike is simply ridiculous.
    >
    >You need a completely different mindset, even to a (small) boat.
    >
    >Take less. Much less.


    It depends on why you are cycling. If distance is important, take
    less. If enjoyment of the land is important and visiting new places,
    take a few luxuries.
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    [Not Responding] wrote:
    > How do you multi week tourers do it then?
    >
    > Here I am cursing after having spent a couple of hours trying cram all
    > my stuff onto my bike. And I'm only away for two nights. Someone else
    > is bringing a tent and we're not taking food as we plan to live off
    > pubs and cafes.


    What do you need for two nights? Sleeping bag, sleep mat, change of
    clothes, spare tube, puncture kit, multitool, toothbrush and money/Magic
    Plastic. Think that's about it, aside from shades and cream if you want
    it to rain.

    Sleeping bag is much easier if it's a summer down filled one. Old
    synthetics tend to be huge, summer down ones are tiny. The mat can go
    on the carrier (and so can the sleeping bag if you put it in an dry-bag
    (Seal Line, Vau De or Ortlieb formal dry bag, not a couple of
    binliners). Keep the clothes light and low bulk and it should be easy.

    Last week's Tour Du Nord I took a couple of pairs of bikesters, pair of
    shorts, couple of shirts in different weights, 3 pairs of pants (padded
    shorts pointless on the 'bent) and a light jacket aside from my
    waterproofs. That was enough for clothes.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 22/7/04 11:24 pm, in article [email protected],
    "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I thought boats were small to live on but a bike is simply ridiculous.
    > My toolkit and spares take up half a pannier, for God's sake. The
    > sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one. That leaves me with half a
    > pannier for for everything else.


    You need the sleeping bag.
    Will your bike break down in the 7miles or so you are going to be doing?
    Then why do you need half a panniers worth of tools/spares? It's hardly the
    wilderness you are travelling to. Ditch all the tools. Your friends will
    have them if you really need them, alternatively the weather will be crap so
    you can bumble around cafe's and pubs and procrastinate.

    That leaves loads of space for fags (don't they sell them in Derbyshire?),
    tuxedo (for changing for dinner), and clothes for almost every occasion.

    ...d
     
  14. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Gonzalez wrote:

    > It depends on why you are cycling. If distance is important, take
    > less. If enjoyment of the land is important and visiting new places,
    > take a few luxuries.


    But still take less than on a boat. Once you've got used to 150l easy
    storage and no weight problems in a sea kayak (which has more limited
    storage than a lot of boats), pretty much /anything/ counts as "less"!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  15. Paul - xxx

    Paul - xxx Guest

    [Not Responding] typed:
    > And I'm only away for two nights.


    Heheheh, you need _much_ less stuff .. ;) Lose all the 'just in case'
    tools, a multitool, chain splitter, spare tube, puncture outfit, electrical
    tape, zip ties and gaffer tape are mostly necessities.

    > My toolkit and spares take up half a pannier


    See above ..

    > The sleeping bag takes up 90% of the other one


    Strap it (bungee cord maybe) to the top of the rack.

    > Looks like the 200 fags are being left behind.


    Not necessarily a bad thing, take some beer instead .. ;)

    Have a great time .. hope the weather's good for you .. ;)

    --
    Paul ...

    (8(|) ... Homer Rocks
     
  16. "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > How do you multi week tourers do it then?


    I've seen these cyclist loaded up to the nines with huge panniers but this looks
    like masochism at its worst!

    I reckon the answer must be to get a group together and hire a van to take all the
    luggage, food, beer (refrigerated van!), tents & spares, tools etc and each person
    takes one day of the tour in turn as support driver and drives on ahead to each
    agreed stopoff.
     
  17. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > How do you multi week tourers do it then?

    >
    > I've seen these cyclist loaded up to the nines with huge panniers but this looks
    > like masochism at its worst!
    >
    > I reckon the answer must be to get a group together and hire a van to take all the
    > luggage, food, beer (refrigerated van!), tents & spares, tools etc and each person
    > takes one day of the tour in turn as support driver and drives on ahead to each
    > agreed stopoff.


    The bare minimum for a camping tour must be:

    Tent,
    Sleeping bag,
    Ground mat,
    Clothes,
    Cooking stuff (If you're away from civilisation)
    Food.

    To tour for a week, the only thing you might need is more food and you
    can probably pick that up on a daily basis.

    I could easily imagine touring for weeks with the same stuff that I took
    to York for the weekend.

    Jon
     
  18. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

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    I hope you are not serious.
     
  19. On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 11:10:46 +0100, Jon Senior
    <[email protected]_DOT_co_DOT_uk.remove> wrote:

    > The bare minimum for a camping tour must be:
    >
    > Tent,


    Though if you are on your own a bivvi bag could do.

    > Sleeping bag,
    > Ground mat,
    > Clothes,
    > Cooking stuff (If you're away from civilisation)


    You can get much of the above in very lightwieght versions too. I have a
    75g stove and a titanium kettle which barely registers on the scales. A
    ground mat is nice but you could get a 3/4 length one or cut down a
    karrimat. (I could mention bubblewrap and party balloans but they tend to
    be good for just one night.)

    Colin
     
  20. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Jon Senior wrote:

    > To tour for a week, the only thing you might need is more food and you
    > can probably pick that up on a daily basis.


    A better selection of clothes may be in order, since conditions may
    change more and laundry facilities may be lacking. But modern
    lightweight clothing doesn't bulk too much and is also increasingly
    pong-resistant, so it's not /that/ much more.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
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