Review: Specialized 'Element 2.0' Gloves

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by CAMPYBOB, Dec 19, 2015.

  1. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "Russia dance and Europe Cry because I have the Most Beatiful Ass!!!"

    Yeah...what I said. No refugees...look at my ass! I'm thinking we could hire all those wimmenz in the video and make one hellova porn flick.
     


  2. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    I dont know... thats a lot of Most Beatiful Asses©... :p

    We might get in trouble! :D
     
  3. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Polyethylene? Who uses that for bushings? No-one. Kitchenware maybe... If you're going to claim you're a materials guru, at least get your materials correct. Polyurethane. Now get back in the kitchen and cook something up and send it too me in your polyethylene containers and then we'll continue that conversation if needed.
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "Who uses that for bushings? No-one. Kitchenware maybe..."

    It's a Miata, doode. It's plenty gay enough to use condoms for bushings.

    UHMW polyethylene bushings:

    The feel reminds me of the feel of a good quality heim where moving the ball you get a little drag, but they are smooth as glass.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    "Also after machining some UHMW plastic I am very impressed with its strength. the stuff coming off the blank"

    "Ultra High Molecular Weight (UHMW) Polyethylene is often referred to as the world’s toughest polymer. UHMW is a linear high density polyethylene which has high abrasion resistance as well as high impact strength. UHMW is also chemical resistant and has a low coefficient of friction which make it highly effective in a variety of applications.
    UHMW is 6 times more abrasion resistant than steel. No cold embrittlement, works from -155ºF to + 200ºF. UHMW is Corrosion Resistant and exhibits virtually no water absorption."

    'Who' uses it? Anyone that knows more than you do. Which is everyone. You make Alf look more like a mechanical engineering genius with every post you type out.

    Go price Tivar. Then turn yourself out a set of...oh, never mind. You can't run a lathe either. Perhaps you should just stick to getting lost on randyknees because you still haven't figured out how to mount a Garmin to a bicycle. Brilliant. Or...failing that there are still plenty of immoveable objects for you to ride your bicycle into.

    Please.
    Pull your head out of your ass...sure, you think it feels good...and ride into the new year without acting like a typical nimrod cyclist. If that is humanly possible.
     
  5. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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  6. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Thank goodness I don't deal with freezing temps. I take it that the reviewed gloves suck like most overpriced gloves like the PI, Cannondale, and other expensive sheot they call gloves! :D
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    INCOMING!!!

    It's 45° this afternoon and the roads are drying out from two days worth of cold rain. I'm going to saddle up later and go for a ride.
     
    Volnix likes this.
  8. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Do people make bushings from UHMW and advertise as such? No. Get fucked. Delrin, yes. Polyurethane, yes. Spherical bearings, yes. Tupperware? No.

    You'd of course know that using delrin, or similar material, on a lower control arm inner bushing on a lowered Miata was a complete and utter waste of time if driven on the road. It'd be destroyed in a couple of months. Oval center hole for the metal sleeve not too long after installation. The suspension geometry just doesn't jive. But of course, you being the God's gift to engineering would know all this... Right? Mazdaspeed sell delrin for race use only but realize that rubber or polyeurathane are it as far as dual road/track use goes

    The folks at Mazdaspeed, some of which were in on the team that won with the 787 at LeMans in the early 90's, recognized this and developed the racing rubber bushing... Rubber bushings with different durometers that actually worked in a given application. Who'da thunk it? LeMans. Racing. Of course, not Camp "ass chaps" Bob.

    The rubber bushings bind that much in a Miata that ~160lbs is required at the rear hubs to just break the lower shock mounts from the lower control arms. That's the reason why I said that unless you change your bushings, there's no real reason to change to a high end shock. Those bushings act like a radial spring, even when new, and only get worse with age. The range of motion in the bushing just isn't there - especially in a dual race/road car like mine was - unless you fancied releasing the lower inner control arm bolts and resetting the alignment every time you adjusted the ride height.

    It's all to easy to say "delrin good, ug, must use, make arms move up and down easy, ugggg, no deflection, suspension geometry not change, ugggg..." but the fact is, it's not as easy as that. People have done that and found out within a few months that they have worn bushings. It's all fun when people change from rubber bushings to poly/delrin/spherical bearings and then sometimes realize that the suspension droop is such that changing a tire is a little more problematic that expected...

    It probably speaks volumes that I have a SCCA Regional champions winners prize and you don't. Spending an afternoon after realizing that I'd broken a front sway bar end link (I hate the term sway bar when cars don't sway - who coined the American term sway bar and is there really a "sway center" - or would that be "roll center"?) and calculated the required spring rates for the front and rear of the car, drove up to Ground Control to buy the required springs and fitted then on Saturday and won on the Sunday. Math, BSc and MSc, who'd a thunk it...

    Keep talking the talk and when you come up with a race win, come tell us all about it. ;) Until then, just keep wishing your rode that Campag "made in ex-Commie Russia" crap that looks like it was molded from liquorice.

    Despite the fact that the Miata is the most raced car in America, I wouldn't race it again. For the cost of a full engine rebuild and a set of Moton shocks, I could buy a 250cc Super Kart and have some real fun.
     
  9. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Actually...yes. Why yes they do.


    OMGWFBBQ!!!!!1!!ONE! A regional!!!!!!


    Better stick with cars. More protection for the next time you drive into an immovable object.
     
  10. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Why stick with immovable objects? I'm in good company with folks that rode Campag brakes and crashed into shit - Fignon a tree, Hinault a tree and a big embankment, Luis Ocana beating Merckx in the Tour rode Campag brakes and the rest is history.

    As for bushings, your choice of Tupperware or delrin for my car is a very bad choice. But from you, I'd expect nothing less.
     
  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by Swami:
    "Why stick with immovable objects?"

    It's a theme of your life. Slamming yourself against superior forces and blaming everyone and everything except your lack of skill, judgement and common sense for the event.

    Tupperware? Sorry, there are no Glock's in my collection.
     
    #51 CAMPYBOB, Jan 27, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    It was 32° to 33° on yesterday's ride with a steady 15-16 MPH wind. I used the Specialized Element 2.0 gloves with wool glove liners and my fingers were very cold by 3 or 4 miles into the ride (less than 15 minutes) and they stayed cold for the duration of the ride.

    I noticed the cross-hatched, rubbery material of the palms is starting to abrade and shred after only a couple hundred miles of use (maximum estimated mileage as I rotate glove sets and use other gloves for warmer or colder temperatures).

    These gloves offer no more warmth, protection or durability than a $3 pair of Menard's ski gloves. I'm as unimpressed with these gloves as I am with Swami's ability to dodge houses and his knowledge of polymers.
     
  13. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    32° again yesterday with the wind at 8 to 10 MPH. I took almost 8 miles, but my fingers went numb just after I turned out of a side wind and into the wind. The wind proofing and insulation of these gloves both are minimal.

    I kept making a fist and flexing my fingers to keep the blood flowing, but it's obvious these gloves suck.

    We are supposed to get less than an inch of snow this morning that will turn to a cold rain this afternoon. I think I'll take the track bike out this afternoon and wear my well used $2 Menard's gloves or my Tractor Supply ones (both over wool glove liners, just like I use the Specialized Element 2.0 gloves) and see how my fingers do by way of comparison.
     
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