RR: Catastrophic Failure

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Corvus Corvax, Aug 8, 2004.

  1. This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    Holiday Valley. Putting the bikes onto the rack, I mention to my wife
    that the eight year old Thule rack on the Honda is looking pretty
    ratty: we should really think about retiring it and picking up a Yakima
    rack for the new Subaru. Next season.

    We hit E-ville around 10:30, unload the gear and roll. The ride begins
    as it always does here, with a 1 1/2 mile doubletrack climb to the top
    of the hill. All the singletrack is off the back side. I think the fix
    has been paying off for all these rainy days: I manage to make the
    whole climb in the middle ring for the first time. Cool. We cruise back
    on the singletrack and run Big Merlin, always a highlight of this trail
    system. A fast, swoopy singletrack traverse with lots of nasty little
    rooty sections to keep you on your toes. It's Flow City. I feel great,
    and I ride smooth and clean. My wife brings up the rear, but I never
    have to wait long for her to catch up. We knock off 11 miles or so,
    capped off with a rocking descent back down the doubletrack to the car.
    We load up, and then stop ten feet out.

    "Did we lock your bike on the rack?" I ask my wife.

    "I don't remember."

    She gets out, checks to make sure the bike is secure, and we're off.

    We stop off at the E-ville Brewing Company for an excellent malty
    German Red and some lunch. The bartender makes sad noises about how he
    wants to be out on his bike instead of tending bar. Only two and a half
    more hours in his shift. We finish our lunch and another couple of
    beers, wish him well on his afternoon ride, and hit the road. We stop
    at a roadside Wal-Mart to pick up some propane so I can do rosin
    potatoes and a rack of ribs on the barbie tonight. We drive off, the
    propane tank rattling around in the back of the car. We merge onto U.S.
    219 heading north to Buffalo, and I spin the car up to 70 mph.

    Suddenly: BANG! *POW*! Oh, shit.

    "What was THAT?" says my wife, as I look in my rearview mirror to see a
    black Klein Attitude race tumbling end-over-end down the center of the
    freeway.

    "We lost a bike. Yours."

    I stop on the shoulder and throw the Honda in reverse, roll the hundred
    yards back to where the bike is laying in the road, traffic quickly
    approaching. I pull it out in time. It's got a bent brake lever and a
    big scratch on the downtube, but no serious damage is evident. The
    Thule rack is trashed:

    <http://www.angelfire.com/ab6/corvuscorvax/failure.jpg>

    Later analysis when we get home indicates the failure was operator
    error. She forgot to strap down the back wheel, and the bike came off
    the tray and snapped the fork mount. Whups. My poor wife is sitting
    around looking Really Glum. I say we were damn lucky. We'll take it to
    the LBS and make sure the frame wasn't bent, but it looks like the bike
    survived pretty well.

    One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.

    CC
     
    Tags:


  2. On 2004-08-08, Corvus Corvax penned:
    >
    > One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    > nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.


    Good point.

    I hope your LBS guys give the bike the green light.

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
  3. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    > set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    > the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    > Holiday Valley.


    Singletrack at Holiday Valley? Whoa...I used to ski there in another life.

    Pete
     
  4. socks

    socks Guest

    fwiw, i always lock my bike to the car's railing ... that way it is
    guaranteed to beat the crap out of my car when it finally comes off,
    rather than end up in traffic.
     
  5. jack

    jack Guest


    > One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    > nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.
    >
    > CC


    Consider getting one of these if you like roofracks. Basically the same
    systems used by buses. Can handle any type of bike, quick load and almost
    mistake proof.

    http://www.sportworks.com/stbob.asp
     
  6. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    > set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    > the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    > Holiday Valley. Putting the bikes onto the rack, I mention to my wife
    > that the eight year old Thule rack on the Honda is looking pretty
    > ratty: we should really think about retiring it and picking up a Yakima
    > rack for the new Subaru. Next season.
    >
    > We hit E-ville around 10:30, unload the gear and roll. The ride begins
    > as it always does here, with a 1 1/2 mile doubletrack climb to the top
    > of the hill. All the singletrack is off the back side. I think the fix
    > has been paying off for all these rainy days: I manage to make the
    > whole climb in the middle ring for the first time. Cool. We cruise back
    > on the singletrack and run Big Merlin, always a highlight of this trail
    > system. A fast, swoopy singletrack traverse with lots of nasty little
    > rooty sections to keep you on your toes. It's Flow City. I feel great,
    > and I ride smooth and clean. My wife brings up the rear, but I never
    > have to wait long for her to catch up. We knock off 11 miles or so,
    > capped off with a rocking descent back down the doubletrack to the car.
    > We load up, and then stop ten feet out.
    >
    > "Did we lock your bike on the rack?" I ask my wife.
    >
    > "I don't remember."
    >
    > She gets out, checks to make sure the bike is secure, and we're off.
    >
    > We stop off at the E-ville Brewing Company for an excellent malty
    > German Red and some lunch. The bartender makes sad noises about how he
    > wants to be out on his bike instead of tending bar. Only two and a half
    > more hours in his shift. We finish our lunch and another couple of
    > beers, wish him well on his afternoon ride, and hit the road. We stop
    > at a roadside Wal-Mart to pick up some propane so I can do rosin
    > potatoes and a rack of ribs on the barbie tonight. We drive off, the
    > propane tank rattling around in the back of the car. We merge onto U.S.
    > 219 heading north to Buffalo, and I spin the car up to 70 mph.
    >


    I've been to that Wal-mart. ;^)

    Sorry to hear about the bike. I highly recommend the Yakima King Cobra as a
    replacement rack. It'll hold a 45lb DH bike securely. It can be adjusted
    from 20" to 700c wheels. No front wheel removal required.

    Mike
     
  7. socks says:

    >fwiw, i always lock my bike to the car's railing ...


    Also FWIW, I always take a piece of rope, goes from the front cross-bar , up
    around the top-tube with a clove hitch (one o' them knot things) and down to
    the cross-bar the other side of the bike.
    Even if the back wheel comes out of the tray, and the fork-mount snaps, it is
    still tied to the car. I started it when I didn't trust the fork mount to hold
    the bike upright, and have comntinued cos it just seemd to make sense.

    Steve "OCD?"
     
  8. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On 8 Aug 2004 15:39:20 -0700, "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    >set records for rain.


    .... trails are just now getting close to perfect down here in MD.


    >"Did we lock your bike on the rack?" I ask my wife.
    >
    >"I don't remember."
    >
    >She gets out, checks to make sure the bike is secure, and we're off.


    >Suddenly: BANG! *POW*! Oh, shit.
    >
    >
    >"We lost a bike. Yours."
    >
    ><http://www.angelfire.com/ab6/corvuscorvax/failure.jpg>


    BRUTAL!

    >One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    >nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.
    >
    >CC


    Peace,
    Bill
     
  9. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Corvus Corvax wrote:
    > This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    > set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    > the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    > Holiday Valley. Putting the bikes onto the rack, I mention to my wife
    > that the eight year old Thule rack on the Honda is looking pretty
    > ratty: we should really think about retiring it and picking up a
    > Yakima rack for the new Subaru. Next season.


    {Cue Ominous Music}

    {snip}

    > Suddenly: BANG! *POW*! Oh, shit.
    >
    > "What was THAT?" says my wife, as I look in my rearview mirror to see
    > a black Klein Attitude race tumbling end-over-end down the center of
    > the freeway.
    >
    > "We lost a bike. Yours."
    >
    > I stop on the shoulder and throw the Honda in reverse, roll the
    > hundred yards back to where the bike is laying in the road, traffic
    > quickly approaching. I pull it out in time. It's got a bent brake
    > lever and a big scratch on the downtube, but no serious damage is
    > evident. The Thule rack is trashed:
    >
    > <http://www.angelfire.com/ab6/corvuscorvax/failure.jpg>
    >
    > Later analysis when we get home indicates the failure was operator
    > error. She forgot to strap down the back wheel, and the bike came off
    > the tray and snapped the fork mount. Whups. My poor wife is sitting
    > around looking Really Glum. I say we were damn lucky. We'll take it to
    > the LBS and make sure the frame wasn't bent, but it looks like the
    > bike survived pretty well.


    On my old Subaru beater-wagon, I had four trays up top, so one of the
    outside ones was facing backwards. I finished a ride and loaded my Fisher
    Paragon on the rack, and started down the freeway. Suddenly, BOOM! I too
    had neglected to strap down the rear wheel, so the bike swung around and
    crashed into the rear of the car, hanging by its fork dropouts (POS Manitou
    Mach 5, btw; thing almost killed me but that's another story). Could have
    been very ugly; lucked out with just a dent...IN THE CAR (so who cares)!

    Now I always turn the cranks backwards when the bike is mounted: "spin to
    win" reminds me to check the wheel lash.

    > One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    > nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.


    Indeed.

    Bill "glad it wasn't worse (and it sure could have been)" S.
     
  10. bomba

    bomba Guest

  11. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    Pete wrote:

    > "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    >>set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    >>the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    >>Holiday Valley.

    >
    >
    > Singletrack at Holiday Valley? Whoa...I used to ski there in another life.
    >
    > Pete
    >
    >



    Same here. The yearly catskills trip with my parents.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  12. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    Michael Dart wrote:

    > "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    >>set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    >>the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    >>Holiday Valley. Putting the bikes onto the rack, I mention to my wife
    >>that the eight year old Thule rack on the Honda is looking pretty
    >>ratty: we should really think about retiring it and picking up a Yakima
    >>rack for the new Subaru. Next season.
    >>
    >>We hit E-ville around 10:30, unload the gear and roll. The ride begins
    >>as it always does here, with a 1 1/2 mile doubletrack climb to the top
    >>of the hill. All the singletrack is off the back side. I think the fix
    >>has been paying off for all these rainy days: I manage to make the
    >>whole climb in the middle ring for the first time. Cool. We cruise back
    >>on the singletrack and run Big Merlin, always a highlight of this trail
    >>system. A fast, swoopy singletrack traverse with lots of nasty little
    >>rooty sections to keep you on your toes. It's Flow City. I feel great,
    >>and I ride smooth and clean. My wife brings up the rear, but I never
    >>have to wait long for her to catch up. We knock off 11 miles or so,
    >>capped off with a rocking descent back down the doubletrack to the car.
    >>We load up, and then stop ten feet out.
    >>
    >>"Did we lock your bike on the rack?" I ask my wife.
    >>
    >>"I don't remember."
    >>
    >>She gets out, checks to make sure the bike is secure, and we're off.
    >>
    >>We stop off at the E-ville Brewing Company for an excellent malty
    >>German Red and some lunch. The bartender makes sad noises about how he
    >>wants to be out on his bike instead of tending bar. Only two and a half
    >>more hours in his shift. We finish our lunch and another couple of
    >>beers, wish him well on his afternoon ride, and hit the road. We stop
    >>at a roadside Wal-Mart to pick up some propane so I can do rosin
    >>potatoes and a rack of ribs on the barbie tonight. We drive off, the
    >>propane tank rattling around in the back of the car. We merge onto U.S.
    >>219 heading north to Buffalo, and I spin the car up to 70 mph.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I've been to that Wal-mart. ;^)
    >
    > Sorry to hear about the bike. I highly recommend the Yakima King Cobra as a
    > replacement rack. It'll hold a 45lb DH bike securely. It can be adjusted
    > from 20" to 700c wheels. No front wheel removal required.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >


    I've got two of those on my car. It's great to not have to take off the
    front wheel and mess up my hydros. It'll carry anything.

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  13. bomba wrote:
    >
    > Corvus Corvax wrote:
    >
    > > One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    > > nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.

    >
    > Might be interesting to you:
    > http://www.singletrackworld.com/article.php?sid=1412


    Whoa! Interesting reading, especially with the number of racers that use
    roof racks.

    Linda and I use a system that holds the bike on the rack mounted to the
    trailer hitch. I have to use an adaptor bar for my bike, owing to the
    frame shape, but I also use a safety strap in case the adaptor lets go.

    The only reason we have a trailer hitch is for the bikes. That gets me a
    strange look when someone asks me what Linda and I tow with a 4-cylinder
    Honda (which gets THEM a strange look). Our little car has taken us to
    some pretty cool trailheads though...
    --
    - Rog

    http://www.wpcusrgrp.org/~rogerbuchanan/index.html

    NOTE: to Reply to this, remove the phrase "NOSPAM"
    from my "Reply To:" address, or it will be returned.
     
  14. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Pete wrote:
    >
    > > "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    > >>set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    > >>the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    > >>Holiday Valley.

    > >
    > >
    > > Singletrack at Holiday Valley? Whoa...I used to ski there in another

    life.
    > >
    > > Pete
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > Same here. The yearly catskills trip with my parents.


    It's a long way from the Catskills. Holiday Valley is in Western NY.

    Mike
     
  15. supabonbon

    supabonbon Guest

    "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > Suddenly: BANG! *POW*! Oh, shit.
    >
    > "What was THAT?" says my wife, as I look in my rearview mirror to see a
    > black Klein Attitude race tumbling end-over-end down the center of the
    > freeway.
    >
    > "We lost a bike. Yours."
    >
    > I stop on the shoulder and throw the Honda in reverse, roll the hundred
    > yards back to where the bike is laying in the road, traffic quickly
    > approaching. I pull it out in time. It's got a bent brake lever and a
    > big scratch on the downtube, but no serious damage is evident. The
    > Thule rack is trashed:
    >


    >
    > CC


    Aw MAN! Couldn't see the pic, but... aw MAN!

    /s
     
  16. Jimbo san

    Jimbo san Guest

    "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > This is practically the first nice weekend we've had all summer. July
    > set records for rain. So it is a real treat to load the hardtails onto
    > the Honda and head down to Ellicottville to hit the singletrack at
    > Holiday Valley.... <snip>


    Sounded like fun...

    > "Did we lock your bike on the rack?" I ask my wife.
    >
    > "I don't remember."
    >
    > She gets out, checks to make sure the bike is secure, and we're off.
    >
    > We stop off at the E-ville Brewing Company for an excellent malty
    > German Red and some lunch. >

    More fun


    > Suddenly: BANG! *POW*! Oh, shit.
    >
    > "What was THAT?" says my wife, as I look in my rearview mirror to see a
    > black Klein Attitude race tumbling end-over-end down the center of the
    > freeway.
    >
    > "We lost a bike. Yours."


    That sux! I am very sorry for J and her little black steed!
    Please give her my condolences...
    We just got the bikes back from Fed-Ex... cross your fingers and spokes


    >
    > One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    > nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.
    >
    > CC


    Good policy... I have learned my lesson


    Jimbo(san)
     
  17. On 2004-08-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    >
    > I've got two of those on my car. It's great to not have to take off
    > the front wheel and mess up my hydros. It'll carry anything.


    Except, iirc, y-frame bikes.

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
  18. gabrielle

    gabrielle Guest

    On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 15:39:20 -0700, Corvus Corvax wrote:

    > Later analysis when we get home indicates the failure was operator
    > error. She forgot to strap down the back wheel, and the bike came off
    > the tray and snapped the fork mount. Whups. My poor wife is sitting
    > around looking Really Glum. I say we were damn lucky. We'll take it to
    > the LBS and make sure the frame wasn't bent, but it looks like the bike
    > survived pretty well.


    That *is* damn lucky. Glad nobody was hurt other than the equipment.

    > One good reason to have everybody secure their own steed on the rack:
    > nobody to blame but yourself if it gets fucked up.


    And check it every time before you take off..."somebody" undid the tire
    strap on one of my friend's bikes (he suspects it was an attempted theft)
    & he didn't notice it before he took off. Lost his bike in front of a
    semi.

    gabrielle
     
  19. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2004-08-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    > >
    > > I've got two of those on my car. It's great to not have to take off
    > > the front wheel and mess up my hydros. It'll carry anything.

    >
    > Except, iirc, y-frame bikes.
    >


    No, I think your thinking of a different rack. The King Cobra holds the
    bike by the front wheel and is adjustable from 20" to 700C. The rear sits
    in a tray and uses a standard ratchet strap. Nothing touches the frame so
    frame design/shape does not matter. You just roll the bike in and lock it
    down. Check it out on http://www.yakima.com

    Mike
     
  20. On 2004-08-10, Michael Dart penned:
    >
    > "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On 2004-08-09, Ride-A-Lot penned:
    >> >
    >> > I've got two of those on my car. It's great to not have to take
    >> > off the front wheel and mess up my hydros. It'll carry anything.

    >>
    >> Except, iirc, y-frame bikes.
    >>

    >
    > No, I think your thinking of a different rack. The King Cobra holds
    > the bike by the front wheel and is adjustable from 20" to 700C. The
    > rear sits in a tray and uses a standard ratchet strap. Nothing
    > touches the frame so frame design/shape does not matter. You just
    > roll the bike in and lock it down. Check it out on
    > http://www.yakima.com


    Hrm. Wonder what I was thinking of.

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
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