Smoking & Cycling

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by snafu, Jul 27, 2004.

  1. fondriest

    fondriest New Member

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    I am a cycling smoker. I just turned 30 and started smoking when i was 17. I would just like to say to all the people that have posted saying how "stupid" smoking is and how they cant understand why anyone would do it, with hindsite (sp?) i dont think any smoker would start again and quiting is the hardest thing you can do (trust me i know, i have been through cocaine, amphetamine, and e addictions) tobacco is far more addictive than any of these.
    I know this may not be what quitters want to hear but i`m affraid its the truth. Dont let it put you off quitting though stick with it, and if at first you dont succeed................
     


  2. Brunswick_kate

    Brunswick_kate New Member

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    I agree that it is difficult. It's also do-able. And even when I was still doing a pack - 1-1/2 packs of smokes a day, over 25 yrs, I knew it was stupid. For the past decade, I knew I was an idiot every time I stood in a snowbank and lit up a smoke.

    And yes, I agree that it takes more than one attempt. I made several...like a couple of dozen....runs at quitting before I finally made it. I really don't think of them as failures. I learned a little bit more about my smoking addiction, when I smoked, what it meant to me with each attempt. I think of these failed attempts as trial runs.
     
  3. Nitrojan646

    Nitrojan646 New Member

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    i don't know if every smoker wants to quit.
     
  4. MojoHead

    MojoHead New Member

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    I quit a few months ago, first full moon after the solstice seemed like a good marker.
    Some great improvements have happened to my health after a pretty radical lifestyle change, it seemed counter productive to maintain a smoking habit.
     
  5. sbwirtz

    sbwirtz New Member

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    I agree. I rode and smoked for a while... then stopped riding because I was always sucking air. I took up riding again, as a non-smoker, and feel much better.
     
  6. ekoh

    ekoh New Member

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    I'm a 37 year old Sales & Marketing Manager and many say I take my racing too seriously. I've got a digital bathroom scale that gives my body fat % and people freak out when I tell them I use my scale everyday. I average a pack per week. Some don't consider me a smoker but my insurance application states that if I smoke 5 sticks or more per week, please tick as 'smoker'. My doctor confirms that's also the case in medical terms.

    Anyway, my pack/week doesn't seem to affect my mid level performance. However, I can really tell the difference in top level efforts such as when trying to jump a gap, or when climbing the steepest of climbs. Your lungs just don't give you the best when it is required to handle tar and nicotine on top of exchanging CO2 for O2.
     
  7. ItsikH

    ItsikH New Member

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    I used to smoke 7-8 cigarettes a day for 10 years. One of the reasons I quit (other than "it makes me feel bad") was that I felt it was disturbing my cycling, and I was getting more and more serious about it. So - I quit 6 years ago. Still, I have friends who smoke a little here and there and it does not seem to affect their cycling, so I suspect it is personal and also that there is a dosage issue.
     
  8. steve007

    steve007 New Member

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    I've been reading this thread for a while and i must say that i am suprised that A) People are still smoking and B) That some people still say how great it is.

    I know alot of people who smoke a little. They generally call themselves social smokers, dont believe they should be classed as a smoker and dont see they are doing themselves much damage, although this is of course all wrong.

    Smoke a little or alot, it still does its damage. Its not until you give up completely that the body goes through a cleansing process.

    Then there is the rubbish about how we have been smoking since time began and that because indians smoke a peace pipe (amongst other substances) that somehow means we are gaining spiritually by lighting up a Marlboro - again rubbish!

    Every human body is different - its a complex chemical structure. Introducing certain chemicals can put off balance this structure. Genetics play a large part in how sensitive certain people are to ciggarette smoke. Whether its passive smoking, 5 sticks a week, or 40 sticks a day, its a risk that doesnt have to be taken.

    Lastly there is always the smug response "Well we are all gonna die of something", or "Better to burn out than fade away", or "We are only here once, I wanna live life to the max", or "Were here for a good time, not a long time". Visit any cancer ward and you will see why all these statements are complete and utter rubbish.

    Its time to take smoking serously. I've seen first hand the suffering smoking can cause. I've seen people will throat cancer crying, desperate to turn the clock back, who realised only too late how precious life is. Not everyone dies peacefully in their sleep, death can be a very very slow and painful experience.

    So quit. While you still can.
     
  9. closesupport

    closesupport Banned

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    if it was only so easy i have smoked for some 15yrs, i have quit smoking for around 12mths the longest, but the fact that everyone else smokes usually is the cause of me starting again; maybe your a social drinker or socialise by other means, unfortunately i don't really socialise other than with work collegues or people i pass on the roads whilst riding, as in a simple hi and bye.

    socialising for me is usually over a cup of coffee and a cigerette? any ideas i couldn't possibly ask my friends / collegues not to smoke just because i have quit, other than that i would have to sit alone and spend time alone or maybe find someone to chat to that doesn't smoke...

    IDEAS WELCOME, it always feels like i'm fighting a lost cause when i'm trying to quit smoking.
     
  10. steve007

    steve007 New Member

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    You reminded me of the other thing people say to illustrate how hard it is to give up, like how nice a ciggarette is with coffee, or after a meal etc etc. The problem is that we are not talking about how well custard goes with apple pie - its a ciggarette and its a killer.

    I totally understand your point of view, there is no doubt that giving up is very very hard, especially when people within your social circle smoke. But you should think of yourself as an individual. Its your choice, no one elses.

    Imagine the alternative and take control.
     
  11. ianhargreaves

    ianhargreaves New Member

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    This is probably one of my fav threads! So interesting

    It's interesting to read that on some posts people say that it only seems to affect their LSD's (long slow distances) and not short sharp climbs as they go anaerobic on climbs anyway. You will probably find that you will not hit your anaerobic threshold so quick if you didnt smoke.
    Don't know where you're from closeup but if your form the UK try the NHS. 0800 167 1670 I used to work for them they will help... Good luck.

    I mean it try while you can. easy to say yeah, hard to do also. I have never smoked so I don't know just how difficult it is to give up but I know it aint easy and studies have proven this! But I do know it's important to give up for you own health and riding.

    GOOD LUCK AND GO FOR IT
     
  12. ItsikH

    ItsikH New Member

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    I have to disagree with you. People do lots of harmful or dangerous things, knowingly or unknowingly, road cycling for instance:rolleyes: . There is nothing "wrong" about it.
    I only managed to quit smoking when I realized that I should be able to accept other people smoking. Death doesn't concern me as much as life - I want to have a better, healthier life.
     
  13. steve007

    steve007 New Member

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    Your statement "I have to disagree with you", followed shortly by "I want to have a better healthier life", indicates a serious flaw in your logic.

    I'm not casting a *moral* judgement in any way; by wrong i mean the assumption that lighter smokers are not causing damage to themselves.

    I've heard many times the argument about other so called "dangerous" sporting or career activities and I can tell you from my experience that its an unreasonable argument, created to justify reason to an unreasonable, stupid act. 1 in 2 lifetime smokers will die from their habit. Emphysema is really not a nice way to die.

    You mention your opinion about life/death, but death is not simply a door we walk through, its a journey.

    What type of journey depends entirely on how we live our lives.
     
  14. ItsikH

    ItsikH New Member

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    As for the justifications smokers use - I more than agree. I was just trying to point out that we make choices which are not always "good" for us, assuming that we can tell good and bad choices in the first place. I love and accept my friends the way they are, with their flaws, and smoking is one many of them share. I also respect them enough to accept their choice.
    As for death - I have seen enough of it, and will soon see some more, to know that very few "die peacfully in their sleep". Its a myth. Most die "peacfully" after years of pain and suffering, smokers or not, there is no "nice way to die". The only difference is between fighting and giving up.
     
  15. steve007

    steve007 New Member

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    I'm gonna split your response into sections and address it one by one.
    ----------------------------------
    As for the justifications smokers use - I more than agree. I was just trying to point out that we make choices which are not always "good" for us, assuming that we can tell good and bad choices in the first place.

    Theres no extra sensory perception needed here. The facts are very obvious. There is no need to "tell" if it is right or wrong.

    I love and accept my friends the way they are, with their flaws, and smoking is one many of them share.

    Yes I'm aware that in certain parts of the world, a higher proportion of the population smoke

    I also respect them enough to accept their choice.

    I'm sure they will thank you for that one day!

    As for death - I have seen enough of it, and will soon see some more, to know that very few "die peacfully in their sleep".

    OK, so you believe that very few die peacefully in their sleep. Its true that for some death can be unpleasant. However the period of life prior to death for smokers is in 90% of cases of a much lower quality. That is to say that 1 in 2 people who spend their life smoking will die as a result of a disease relating to their smoking habit.

    Its a myth. Most die "peacfully" after years of pain and suffering, smokers or not, there is no "nice way to die".

    Ahhh, so now you do believe that people die peacefully....will you make your mind up! Of course there is no nice way to die - the will to live is installed in us all from birth. Its wide accepted that as we get older our body becomes less efficient, some people need some form of medication to address certain problems. Cancer is not so easily dealt with.

    The only difference is between fighting and giving up.

    Lung cancer doesnt give you a choice. It doesnt respect your effort to live. Its a killer and whether you fight or give up, its got you.
     
  16. Brunswick_kate

    Brunswick_kate New Member

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    On a complete different note, I'm now past my 8th months of being smoke-free and it feels just fine.
     
  17. OKpro

    OKpro New Member

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    I was leaving a sponsor dinner after the USPRO Champs this year and there is a womans team that is sponsored by the same company that my team is. The "star" of this team who has won the Liberty Classic many times was smoking on the steps of the restaurant as I walked out. I was really surprised but came to find out that alot of bike racers smoke.... Even the best ones.



     
  18. steve007

    steve007 New Member

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    Excellent work. It takes alot of willpower to overcome those habits.

    Also in response to OKPro's comment, I understand your point, I have a friend in the SAS who smokes and he is very very fit and pretty tough. I'm not convinced however that he wouldnt be fitter and reduce the risk of lung cancer into the bargain if he didnt smoke.

    With regard to cyclists, I have a friend who smokes the occasional ciggarette. I think although you saw this person smoking, I would think it would be very occasional, otherwise it would effect cardio-respiratory fitness i am sure.
     
  19. HughMann

    HughMann New Member

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    Gave up from 100+ a day addiction.
    Took 2 years of hell to get clean.
    Had good motivation to quit. 2 mates dead from Lung Cancer, both younger and smoked less than me.
    15 years later still not game to have 1 as I know I will start again.
    One thing I enjoy about cycling is that at my level (commute/fitness) it is practically cigarette free.

    Anyhow, there is no ashtray on a bike, where do you put the buts? No, No No - you dont litter do you!

    Hugh
     
  20. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    Thought you might be interested in this victory over cancer story even nonsmokers can get cancer and I find it very troubling when people are sent home to die with no hope. Sorry about your Dad that's alot to handle when it's someone close.
    http://www.thebodytherapycenter.com/drg.htm

     
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