SOMETIMES RIDING BIKES IS BAD FOR YOUR YOU



T

Tom Sherman

Guest
[email protected] aka Frank Krygowski wrote:
> On Nov 11, 10:56 am, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Claire Petersky wrote:
>>
>>> You can live in Mr. Keats world, where, when you are in pain, you seek to
>>> feel better and be happier - through snuggling with your significant other,
>>> through food, through some recreational chemicals, whatever - and you feel
>>> positive about the world and see that people are good to each other.
>>> You can live in Mr. Sherman's world, where, when you are in pain, you hold
>>> it in, and don't trust others. You then feel pessimistic about the world and
>>> see mostly violence.
>>> I'd rather live where Mr. Keats does.

>> Reality stinks, no?

>
> Well, perhaps yours does. But for many of us, reality is quite nice
> indeed.


You mean the one-fifth of the world population that does not live in
poverty?

> To a certain extent, we create our own realities. You can control
> much of what happens to you.


Not in the larger scheme of things.

> And more important, you can control your response to what happens to you.


Pollyannaism lives.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
Tradition is the worst rational for action.
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Bob wrote:
> On Nov 11, 2:29 am, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Tom Keats wrote:
>>
>>> People all over the world are generally good to people.

>>
>> I missed that. Mostly there is violence - physical, economic and
>> emotional. Hominids have a long way to go to become a moral species.

>
> I have undoubtedly witnessed more violence than 99.9% of this NG's
> users and I still agree with Tom K. If the world were as dark and
> violent a place as you seem to believe it to be the human species
> would have been extinct long ago. I always find it amusing in a sad
> kind of way that people who haven't been in a fight since grammar
> school, have never been the victim of intentional violence or
> inflicted violence on others, have never seen anyone die violently,
> and live- it would seem- in an area where the worst thing likely to
> happen to them is someone being rude to them at the Starbucks decry
> our "violent nature".


Bingo-amundo. (Bob for President.)

Sort of like how our "rights" are being trampled -- like **** Cheney really
wants to listen in on your Aunt Mary sharing recipes with Mom. It's a
joke...
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Bob wrote:
> On Nov 11, 1:37 am, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>>
>> Watching how an injured cat behaves is instructive. No yowling
>> complaints, they just find a quiet corner to hide in and heal.
>>

>
> And so we find Tom Sherman aspiring to be a *****.


Hey, he's finally a success!
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Tom Sherman <[email protected]> writes:

>>>> I'd rather live where Mr. Keats does.
>>> Reality stinks, no?

>>
>> Well, perhaps yours does. But for many of us, reality is quite nice
>> indeed.

>
> You mean the one-fifth of the world population that does not live in
> poverty?


It's not always appropriate to apply Western, and especially
USA'an values onto other people around the world. Yes, there
are the garbage dump denizens of Mexico City, and other
unfortunately circumstanced people. But there are many others
who happily have everything thing they need -- it just might
not include cars, cell phones, iPods, microwave ovens, personal
computers, refrigerators, GoreTex jackets, titanium golf clubs,
Birkenstocks, or even shoes. Or even electricity. Or even money.
By outsiders' standards they seem quite deprived, but they may
have a wealth of culture, tradition, heritage, and a bunch of stuff
that's intangible to the typical Western mind & Western heart.

A few years ago I read an article about Interdependence Day,
and had an epiphany. Your American ideal of "independence"
is hardly universally applicable. We are ultimately social
and sociable creatures. There certainly are individual
exceptions (i.e: crooks -- the extremists of the independence
ideal.) But we mustn't allow them to taint our views of the
general human condition.

>> To a certain extent, we create our own realities. You can control
>> much of what happens to you.

>
> Not in the larger scheme of things.


I think maybe you've been reading a little too much Henry James,
and maybe Kafka. Perhaps you've just been reading too much, period.

>> And more important, you can control your response to what happens to you.

>
> Pollyannaism lives.


Whadda grouch. I wish I could cheer ya up and give ya
some support. That's what we're here for.

So what were we talking about? Oh, yeah. Everytime I've
wiped out on my bike in front of an audience, I've had
all kinds of support and concern as to my well-being
directed to me from said audience. Nobody's kicked me
while I was down, nor attempted to steal my wallet.
Put /that/ in yer pipe & smoke it.


cheers,
Tom

--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
B

Bob

Guest
On Nov 11, 9:46 pm, [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:

> So what were we talking about? Oh, yeah. Everytime I've
> wiped out on my bike in front of an audience, I've had
> all kinds of support and concern as to my well-being
> directed to me from said audience. Nobody's kicked me
> while I was down, nor attempted to steal my wallet.
> Put /that/ in yer pipe & smoke it.


You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
*global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
experience".)

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Tom Keats wrote:

>
> [large dialog snipped]
>
> >> People all over the world are generally good to people.

> >
> > I missed that. Mostly there is violence -

>
> Or to rephrase:
>
> You can live in Mr. Keats world, where, when you are in pain, you seek to
> feel better and be happier - through snuggling with your significant other,
> through food, through some recreational chemicals, whatever - and you feel
> positive about the world and see that people are good to each other.
>
> You can live in Mr. Sherman's world, where, when you are in pain, you hold
> it in, and don't trust others. You then feel pessimistic about the world and
> see mostly violence.
>
> I'd rather live where Mr. Keats does.


Or you could live in my world: LIVEDRUNK!

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.
Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:
> On Nov 11, 9:46 pm, [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:
>
>> So what were we talking about? Oh, yeah. Everytime I've
>> wiped out on my bike in front of an audience, I've had
>> all kinds of support and concern as to my well-being
>> directed to me from said audience. Nobody's kicked me
>> while I was down, nor attempted to steal my wallet.
>> Put /that/ in yer pipe & smoke it.

>
> You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
> *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
> actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
> makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
> experience".)


Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
conditions as they actually are. Seeing and understanding reality is
truly a curse.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
Tradition is the worst rational for action.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Tom Keats wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> Tom Sherman <[email protected]> writes:
>
>>>>> I'd rather live where Mr. Keats does.
>>>> Reality stinks, no?
>>> Well, perhaps yours does. But for many of us, reality is quite nice
>>> indeed.

>> You mean the one-fifth of the world population that does not live in
>> poverty?

>
> It's not always appropriate to apply Western, and especially
> USA'an values onto other people around the world. Yes, there
> are the garbage dump denizens of Mexico City, and other
> unfortunately circumstanced people.


The majority and growing population group. Conditions will only
deteriorate with population growth, environmental degradation and
corporate economic predation.

> But there are many others
> who happily have everything thing they need -- it just might
> not include cars, cell phones, iPods, microwave ovens, personal
> computers, refrigerators, GoreTex jackets, titanium golf clubs,
> Birkenstocks, or even shoes. Or even electricity. Or even money.
> By outsiders' standards they seem quite deprived, but they may
> have a wealth of culture, tradition, heritage, and a bunch of stuff
> that's intangible to the typical Western mind & Western heart.


Well, contemporary Western society is lacking in pretty much everything
but material wealth.

> A few years ago I read an article about Interdependence Day,
> and had an epiphany. Your American ideal of "independence"
> is hardly universally applicable. We are ultimately social
> and sociable creatures. There certainly are individual
> exceptions (i.e: crooks -- the extremists of the independence
> ideal.) But we mustn't allow them to taint our views of the
> general human condition.
>
>>> To a certain extent, we create our own realities. You can control
>>> much of what happens to you.

>> Not in the larger scheme of things.

>
> I think maybe you've been reading a little too much Henry James,
> and maybe Kafka. Perhaps you've just been reading too much, period.


Only the independently wealthy have any real control over their lives.

>>> And more important, you can control your response to what happens to you.

>> Pollyannaism lives.

>
> Whadda grouch. I wish I could cheer ya up and give ya
> some support. That's what we're here for.


I thought it was to entertain ourselves by discussing bicycles?

> So what were we talking about? Oh, yeah. Everytime I've
> wiped out on my bike in front of an audience, I've had
> all kinds of support and concern as to my well-being
> directed to me from said audience. Nobody's kicked me
> while I was down, nor attempted to steal my wallet.
> Put /that/ in yer pipe & smoke it.


We are talking Canucks here?

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
Tradition is the worst rational for action.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Ryan Cousineau wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> Tom Keats wrote:

>> [large dialog snipped]
>>
>>>> People all over the world are generally good to people.
>>> I missed that. Mostly there is violence -

>> Or to rephrase:
>>
>> You can live in Mr. Keats world, where, when you are in pain, you seek to
>> feel better and be happier - through snuggling with your significant other,
>> through food, through some recreational chemicals, whatever - and you feel
>> positive about the world and see that people are good to each other.
>>
>> You can live in Mr. Sherman's world, where, when you are in pain, you hold
>> it in, and don't trust others. You then feel pessimistic about the world and
>> see mostly violence.
>>
>> I'd rather live where Mr. Keats does.

>
> Or you could live in my world: LIVEDRUNK!
>

I like beer, but not hangovers. Therefore, I limit myself to a maximum
of 2 on weekdays, and 4 on weekends. Sometimes I cheat a bit by getting
16-oz. bottle of Sprecher.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
Tradition is the worst rational for action.
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Tom Sherman <[email protected]> writes:
> Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:
>> On Nov 11, 9:46 pm, [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:
>>
>>> So what were we talking about? Oh, yeah. Everytime I've
>>> wiped out on my bike in front of an audience, I've had
>>> all kinds of support and concern as to my well-being
>>> directed to me from said audience. Nobody's kicked me
>>> while I was down, nor attempted to steal my wallet.
>>> Put /that/ in yer pipe & smoke it.

>>
>> You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
>> *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
>> actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
>> makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
>> experience".)

>
> Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
> conditions as they actually are.


From Irving Stone's biognovel: Passions of the Mind,
I recall the phrase: "In Berlin the situation is serious
but not hopeless. In Vienna the situation is hopeless
but not serious."

> Seeing and understanding reality is
> truly a curse.


No more so than ascribing "reality" to one's personal
world view.

But seeing and understanding your world view as reality
is truly a curse. So how come ya wanna be cursed?
You're a nice guy, a good guy, with so much positiveness
to contribute to the world. And you in fact do just that!
But please don't be a diode. The whole world is definitely
/not/ against you.

Remember that hokey Anthony Quinn line from Lawrence of
Arabia: "I am a river to my people!"? I invite you to
likewise allow people to be rivers to you.

We owe it to each other to be rivers to each other.
Interdependence and interconnection is what's real.


cheers,
Billy Budd

--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> writes:
> "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Tom Keats wrote:

>
> [large dialog snipped]
>
>>> People all over the world are generally good to people.

>>
>> I missed that. Mostly there is violence -

>
> Or to rephrase:
>
> You can live in Mr. Keats world, where, when you are in pain, you seek to
> feel better and be happier - through snuggling with your significant other,
> through food, through some recreational chemicals, whatever - and you feel
> positive about the world and see that people are good to each other.
>
> You can live in Mr. Sherman's world, where, when you are in pain, you hold
> it in, and don't trust others. You then feel pessimistic about the world and
> see mostly violence.
>
> I'd rather live where Mr. Keats does.


You pretty much already do. We all live in the
same place: Planet Earth. Despite some people's
denials & sardonic wisecracks about it. I guess
it's a complex, multi-faceted place, but it's
ultimately the same ol' Planet Earth.

And I ain't a "Mr." I'm just another Tom ;-)

Perhaps these literary quotes will amuse Mr Sherman:
http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/4500/quo_eor.htm


cheers,
Tom
--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
B

Bob

Guest
On Nov 11, 11:02 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
wrote:
> Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:
>
> > You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
> > *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
> > actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
> > makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
> > experience".)

>
> Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
> conditions as they actually are. Seeing and understanding reality is
> truly a curse.
>


Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip. It is actually
rather pathetic, particularly from someone that hasn't experienced or
even seen first hand the violence and evil you claim is the natural
state of the human race.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Bob Hunt wrote:
> On Nov 11, 11:02 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:
>>
>>> You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
>>> *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
>>> actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
>>> makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
>>> experience".)

>> Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
>> conditions as they actually are. Seeing and understanding reality is
>> truly a curse.
>>

>
> Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip. It is actually
> rather pathetic, particularly from someone that hasn't experienced or
> even seen first hand the violence and evil you claim is the natural
> state of the human race.


And how would you know what I have and have not seen?

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"the grinning buddy bear carries a fork." - g.d.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Bob Hunt wrote:
> On Nov 11, 11:02 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:
>>
>>> You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
>>> *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
>>> actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
>>> makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
>>> experience".)

>> Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
>> conditions as they actually are. Seeing and understanding reality is
>> truly a curse.
>>

>
> Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip....


It is not intended to be hip. You have much to learn if that is your
thought process.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"the grinning buddy bear carries a fork." - g.d.
 
B

Bob

Guest
On Nov 12, 7:29 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
wrote:
>
> > Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip. It is actually
> > rather pathetic, particularly from someone that hasn't experienced or
> > even seen first hand the violence and evil you claim is the natural
> > state of the human race.

>
> And how would you know what I have and have not seen?
>


Enlighten me. How many incidents of intentional violence *have* you
seen? A person cutting in line in front of you at Starbucks doesn't
count unless someone hits the floor. Neither does watching television
or attending an NFL or NHL game.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
B

Bob

Guest
On Nov 12, 7:30 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
wrote:
> Bob Hunt wrote:
> > On Nov 11, 11:02 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> > wrote:
> >> Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:

>
> >>> You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
> >>> *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
> >>> actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
> >>> makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
> >>> experience".)
> >> Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
> >> conditions as they actually are. Seeing and understanding reality is
> >> truly a curse.

>
> > Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip....

>
> It is not intended to be hip. You have much to learn if that is your
> thought process.
>



Whether it is intended to be hip or not, the "world weary cynic" act
remains pathetic so why not give it a rest? I do agree with you though
that I have a lot to learn. I think we *all* could use more knowledge.
Judging by your patronizing tone, I doubt that's what you meant
though.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
On Nov 10, 5:11 pm, bluezfolk <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Nov 10, 2:58 pm, [email protected] wrote:
>
> > Here are some pictures of the result of a small fall i had last weekhttp://picasaweb.google.com/cyclingthings/Bikes
> > going to fast on a wet road and trying to avoid a car going up hill.
> > do not let this discourage you, riding bikes is the best thing in the
> > world
> > regards
> > carloswww.bikingthings.com
> > Get Faster, Enjoy Cycling, Get Fit, Live Better.

>
> OUCH!!!! I hope nothings broken


nope, just the brushes. i have to tell you all, in a way i like pain,
i kept riding for 30 miles after the fall and I sucked bad that day.
it was a climb of about 3000 feet or more in less than 15 miles and i
had cramps all over my legs. it was just one of those days that
everything hurts, but it is what i always say: when it really hurts
and you suck! is the time when you bocome a better rider
carlos
www.bikingthings.com
Get Faster, Enjoy Cycling, Get Fit, Live Better.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Bob Hunt wrote:
> On Nov 12, 7:29 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>>> Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip. It is actually
>>> rather pathetic, particularly from someone that hasn't experienced or
>>> even seen first hand the violence and evil you claim is the natural
>>> state of the human race.

>> And how would you know what I have and have not seen?
>>

>
> Enlighten me. How many incidents of intentional violence *have* you
> seen? A person cutting in line in front of you at Starbucks doesn't
> count unless someone hits the floor. Neither does watching television
> or attending an NFL or NHL game.


The point is Bob Hunt made an assumption with no evidence. Correct?

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"the grinning buddy bear carries a fork." - g.d.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Bob Hunt wrote:
> On Nov 12, 7:30 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Bob Hunt wrote:
>>> On Nov 11, 11:02 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
>>> wrote:
>>>> Over-Optimist Bob Hunt wrote:
>>>>> You're confusing your *experienced* reality with Mr. Sherman's
>>>>> *global* reality. He thinks globally you know. ("Thinking globally" is
>>>>> actually code for "following a political idealogy- left or right, it
>>>>> makes no difference- no matter how disconnected the conclusions are to
>>>>> experience".)
>>>> Nonsense. People delude themselves, since most prefer not to face
>>>> conditions as they actually are. Seeing and understanding reality is
>>>> truly a curse.
>>> Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip....

>> It is not intended to be hip. You have much to learn if that is your
>> thought process.
>>

> Whether it is intended to be hip or not, the "world weary cynic" act
> remains pathetic so why not give it a rest?


Yo Bob, it is NOT an act.

> I do agree with you though
> that I have a lot to learn. I think we *all* could use more knowledge.
> Judging by your patronizing tone, I doubt that's what you meant
> though.


No offense Mr. Hunt, but you do seem rather middle class, middle
American, to judge from your posts.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"the grinning buddy bear carries a fork." - g.d.
 
B

Bob

Guest
On Nov 13, 7:54 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
wrote:
> Bob Hunt wrote:
> > On Nov 12, 7:29 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
> > wrote:
> >>> Give it a rest. Your "world weary cynic" act isn't hip. It is actually
> >>> rather pathetic, particularly from someone that hasn't experienced or
> >>> even seen first hand the violence and evil you claim is the natural
> >>> state of the human race.
> >> And how would you know what I have and have not seen?

>
> > Enlighten me. How many incidents of intentional violence *have* you
> > seen? A person cutting in line in front of you at Starbucks doesn't
> > count unless someone hits the floor. Neither does watching television
> > or attending an NFL or NHL game.

>
> The point is Bob Hunt made an assumption with no evidence. Correct?
>
> --
> Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
> "the grinning buddy bear carries a fork." - g.d.


That may be your point but it doesn't answer the question, does it?
You seem to be easily sidetracked so I'll repeat it once more before
letting the matter drop entirely. How many incidents of intentional
violence *have* you seen? Surely if things are as bad as you say it
shouldn't be that hard for you to think of a few examples. I mean, you
have written in this thread, "Mostly there is violence - physical,
economic and emotional. Hominids have a long way to go to become a
moral species." and "Well, contemporary Western society is lacking in
pretty much everything but material wealth." Or are you saying that
things are just fine where you are but they are horrible everywhere
else?

Regards,
Bob Hunt