touring on a Cannondale R600



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Drew Steen

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I'm considering some light (4-5 days, moderate terrain) touring on a Cannondale R600. I'm a big guy
-- 220 pounds -- and I'd have probably 50 more pounds of gear. Is this bike up to the task, or do I
need to find myself a real touring bike?
 
B

Bildom

Guest
It would be fine if you left the 50 pounds of stuff home and went with a light seatpost rack,
minimal gear, and a credit card. A few more bucks, but much more fun riding. My 2 cents. - Bill
"Drew Steen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I'm considering some light (4-5 days, moderate terrain) touring on a Cannondale R600. I'm a big
> guy -- 220 pounds -- and I'd have probably 50 more pounds of gear. Is this bike up to the task, or
> do I need to find myself a real touring bike?
 
D

David Storm

Guest
You might want to consider a B.O.B. trailer. The R600 could probably handle the B.O.B. better
than panniers.

"Drew Steen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I'm considering some light (4-5 days, moderate terrain) touring on a Cannondale R600. I'm a big
> guy -- 220 pounds -- and I'd have probably 50 more pounds of gear. Is this bike up to the task, or
> do I need to find myself a real touring bike?
 
T

Tbgibb

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, "Drew Steen" <[email protected]> writes:

>I'm considering some light (4-5 days, moderate terrain) touring on a Cannondale R600. I'm a big guy
>-- 220 pounds -- and I'd have probably 50 more pounds of gear. Is this bike up to the task, or do I
>need to find myself a real touring bike?
>

Being a "road" bike the chain stays are liable to be short, so short that panniers will be in the
way of your heels as you pedal.

Does the bike have rack mount bosses on the seat stays? If not you'll be using sheet metal straps to
hold the rack(s) on the bike. These might or might not hold that much weight. Are there eyelets on
the dropouts? The lack of these could more problematic than the seat stay bosses.

Consider a large (Caradice) seat bag or (as has been suggested) a rack that mounts on the seat post
for some "credit card touring." Then if the "bug bites" consider a "real" touring bike or trailer.

Tom Gibb <[email protected]
 
P

Peter

Guest
TBGibb wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, "Drew Steen" <[email protected]> writes:
>
>
>>I'm considering some light (4-5 days, moderate terrain) touring on a Cannondale R600. I'm a big
>>guy -- 220 pounds -- and I'd have probably 50 more pounds of gear. Is this bike up to the task, or
>>do I need to find myself a real touring bike?

> Being a "road" bike the chain stays are liable to be short, so short that panniers will be in the
> way of your heels as you pedal.
>
> Does the bike have rack mount bosses on the seat stays? If not you'll be using sheet metal straps
> to hold the rack(s) on the bike. These might or might not hold that much weight.

Having toured with panniers and camping gear both on bicycles with touring geometry and on my
close-coupled Cannondale R800 ('criterium' model), I can't say I noticed much difference. Yes, on
the R800 I have to fold the little front pocket on my panniers over so my heels won't hit, but they
don't hold much anyway. I attach the top of the rack to my brake bolt which holds it very securely
and my rear dropouts have threaded holes for the lower attachment. But I've also used the P-shaped
clamps before on the seatstays and found them to be entirely adequate at holding panniers with my
camping gear.

I'd suggest the original poster go ahead and put his panniers on his R600; load them up and go for a
short trial ride to make sure everything is secure and his heels have clearance; and then have an
enjoyable time on his tour.
 
F

Frank Krygowski

Guest
Peter wrote:
>
>
> I'd suggest the original poster go ahead and put his panniers on his R600; load them up and go for
> a short trial ride to make sure everything is secure and his heels have clearance; and then have
> an enjoyable time on his tour.

Putting the heaviest part of the load into front panniers can help, too.

--
Frank Krygowski [email protected]
 
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