Wife & Whether to Helmet or not to Helmet

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bestest Handsander, Apr 26, 2006.

  1. My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    instructed that I should die.

    So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?
     
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  2. Bestest Handsander wrote:
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish
    > provided that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no
    > brain damage or permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries
    > are sustained, I am instructed that I should die.


    Uh... sounds like a personal problem.

    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    Hmm. I think the wife needs a bit of reprogramming.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  3. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Bestest Handsander wrote:
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish
    > provided that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no
    > brain damage or permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries
    > are sustained, I am instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    Divorce her and take up Duplicate Bridge.

    HTH, BS
     
  4. On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 23:52:37 -0600, "Bestest Handsander"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    >that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    >permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    >instructed that I should die.
    >
    >So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    >agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    Dear BH,

    Judging by often-cited statistics from several nations on
    cycling head injuries versus helmet use, a helmet won't make
    any significant difference.

    Your best bet would be to move to a country where cycling is
    popular. The fatal accident rate (and the helmet-use rate)
    in such countries are typically much lower than in the
    United States:

    See the graph on the right of this page:

    http://www.cyclehelmets.org/

    It shows that in 1998, the U.S. twice as many fatal
    accidents per mile ridden as the Netherlands, even though
    38% of U.S. riders wore helmet, as opposed to 0.1% of the
    reckless riders in the Netherlands.

    In any case, more husbands are probably murdered every year
    by their wives in the U.S. [1] than are killed on bicycles
    (about 700-800 husbands, wives, and singles). Consider
    wearing a helmet if you criticize her.

    Cheers,

    Carl Fogel

    [1] See http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/mf.pdf for an
    example of how tricky statistics are. This often-cited study
    of family murders was culled from only 8,000 killings in the
    75 most murderous counties 1988--would that there had been
    only 8,000 killings.

    And would that the government had made the details plainer!
    You'd think that it would be easier for bachelors to find
    out before the wedding how bloodthirsty the brides are
    likely to be, but this obvious question is obscured by
    cultural prejudice and bureaucratese.
     
  5. Bestest Handsander wrote:
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    > that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    > permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    > instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    Too late! Best thing you can do now is get elbow and knee pads.

    dl
     
  6. [email protected] wrote:
    > On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 23:52:37 -0600, "Bestest Handsander"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    > >that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    > >permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    > >instructed that I should die.
    > >
    > >So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > >agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?

    >
    > Dear BH,
    >
    > Judging by often-cited statistics from several nations on
    > cycling head injuries versus helmet use, a helmet won't make
    > any significant difference.
    >
    > Your best bet would be to move to a country where cycling is
    > popular. The fatal accident rate (and the helmet-use rate)
    > in such countries are typically much lower than in the
    > United States:
    >
    > See the graph on the right of this page:
    >
    > http://www.cyclehelmets.org/
    >
    > It shows that in 1998, the U.S. twice as many fatal
    > accidents per mile ridden as the Netherlands, even though
    > 38% of U.S. riders wore helmet, as opposed to 0.1% of the
    > reckless riders in the Netherlands.


    I'll bet speed is an important factor. Cyclists in the US I'm guessing
    tend more to be fitness-types who are probably riding on average much
    faster than the average Dutch rider. In The Netherlands, you get all
    sorts of normal people and old ladies riding bikes around at 3 mph in
    addition to their fitness-types. Sure you can get seriously injured
    getting doored at 3mph, but crashing at 25mph is a much better way to
    ensure adequate injury!

    Joseph
     
  7. I can make this decision very easy for you.

    There are only 2 reasons NOT to wear a helmet.

    A ) You don't have a brain.

    B ) You have a spare head.

    If you're not sure which choice would be better for you, you don't need
    to wear one. :)

    Lewis.

    ******
     
  8. Bestest Handsander wrote:
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    > that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    > permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    > instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    The US Weather service recommends helmets
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11765409
     
  9. On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 23:52:37 -0600, "Bestest Handsander"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    >that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    >permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    >instructed that I should die.


    Ask her if she looks forward to pushing you around in wheelchair due
    to your spinal injuries while your brain and mouth still function
    fine.

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  10. Bestest Handsander wrote:
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    > that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    > permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    > instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    Must be that time of year for this crappola....
     
  11. Marz

    Marz Guest

    Bestest Handsander wrote:
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    > that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    > permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    > instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    The only reason I wear a helmet when road riding is to keep the peace
    at home. She thinks it'll save my life and I know it's a worthless
    piece of foam, but I can't be arsed to have the arguement so I wear it.

    Laters,

    Marz
     
  12. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > I can make this decision very easy for you.
    >
    > There are only 2 reasons NOT to wear a helmet.
    >
    > A ) You don't have a brain.
    >
    > B ) You have a spare head.
    >
    > If you're not sure which choice would be better for you, you don't
    > need to wear one. :)


    Well, that parrots the helmet industry's marketing claims very neatly.
    Unfortunately, as Carl Fogel summarized, the evidence does not provide
    convincing evidence that helmets actually help. It would have been
    really nice if the protective effect was clear. But who knows if
    eventually more data will provide better power of discrimination about
    this.
     
  13. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Thu, 27 Apr 2006 00:22:33 -0600, [email protected] wrote:

    >On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 23:52:37 -0600, "Bestest Handsander"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish provided
    >>that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain damage or
    >>permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are sustained, I am
    >>instructed that I should die.
    >>
    >>So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    >>agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?

    >
    >Dear BH,
    >
    >Judging by often-cited statistics from several nations on
    >cycling head injuries versus helmet use, a helmet won't make
    >any significant difference.
    >
    >Your best bet would be to move to a country where cycling is
    >popular. The fatal accident rate (and the helmet-use rate)
    >in such countries are typically much lower than in the
    >United States:
    >
    >See the graph on the right of this page:
    >
    >http://www.cyclehelmets.org/
    >
    >It shows that in 1998, the U.S. twice as many fatal
    >accidents per mile ridden as the Netherlands, even though
    >38% of U.S. riders wore helmet, as opposed to 0.1% of the
    >reckless riders in the Netherlands.
    >
    >In any case, more husbands are probably murdered every year
    >by their wives in the U.S. [1] than are killed on bicycles
    >(about 700-800 husbands, wives, and singles). Consider
    >wearing a helmet if you criticize her.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >Carl Fogel
    >
    >[1] See http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/mf.pdf for an
    >example of how tricky statistics are. This often-cited study
    >of family murders was culled from only 8,000 killings in the
    >75 most murderous counties 1988--would that there had been
    >only 8,000 killings.
    >
    >And would that the government had made the details plainer!
    >You'd think that it would be easier for bachelors to find
    >out before the wedding how bloodthirsty the brides are
    >likely to be, but this obvious question is obscured by
    >cultural prejudice and bureaucratese.


    All of those crime statistics should come with strict warnings about their use
    by untrained personnel. In the lingo of governmental crime reporting a "friend
    or acquaintance" is a person you know by name (at least that's the standard used
    by responding police officers nationwide). So if the crack dealer you've been
    chasing off your storefront for weeks takes a pop at you the "friend or
    acquaintance" box will be checked.

    Family member for purposes of these statistics also includes baby-daddies just
    released from prison following a domestic abuse conviction who slug down a quart
    of beer after months of abstinence and are disappointed in not being welcomed
    back with well, let's presume months of abstinence, these types end up on both
    sides of the homicide equation. Being more successful than most stalkers, though
    otherwise undistinguished, they are counted as family members for the
    statistics.

    Ron
     
  14. Tim McNamara wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > I can make this decision very easy for you.
    > >
    > > There are only 2 reasons NOT to wear a helmet.
    > >
    > > A ) You don't have a brain.
    > >
    > > B ) You have a spare head.
    > >
    > > If you're not sure which choice would be better for you, you don't
    > > need to wear one. :)

    >
    > Well, that parrots the helmet industry's marketing claims very neatly.
    > Unfortunately, as Carl Fogel summarized, the evidence does not provide
    > convincing evidence that helmets actually help. It would have been
    > really nice if the protective effect was clear. But who knows if
    > eventually more data will provide better power of discrimination about
    > this.


    There are all sorts of arguments about why the statistics don't show so
    much about how much a helmet helps, vs what sort of people use helmets
    and what sort of people get into accidents. It can be argued that a
    helmet does not really provide any protection. But does anyone argue
    that a helmet is the cause of injury? I don't think so. So using a
    helmet won't hurt you, and possibly will help. I think I'll wear one.

    Joseph
     
  15. Richard B

    Richard B Guest

    "Bestest Handsander" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish
    > provided that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no
    > brain damage or permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries
    > are sustained, I am instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?
    >
    >


    I suppose it depends on what you are going to hit.

    Head, helmet or not, vs. Auto;
    Head will lose.

    Head without helmet vs. curb;
    Head will probably lose.

    Head with helmet vs. curb;
    Chances are better that you will not end up with a depressed skull
    fracture.

    Head without helmet vs. pavement;
    Possible head abrasions or lacerations, concussion or skull fracture

    Head with helmet vs. pavement;
    Reduced chance of abrasions, lacerations, concussion or skull fracture.

    I wear a helmet:
    I hit some debris on a class 1 bike trail and took a header a year ago.
    I ended up unconscious on the bike trail, covered with blood from a head
    wound that took 11 stitches to close and had a minor concussion.
    After a year my only remaining symptom is some mild positional vertigo
    when I look straight up.

    I do not think I would have fared so well had I not been wearing a
    helmet.

    In the end it is your choice.


    Rich
     
  16. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    Do not go to the Newsgroups for answers to this question, for they
    will tell you both no and yes.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  17. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > There are all sorts of arguments about why the statistics don't show
    > so much about how much a helmet helps, vs what sort of people use
    > helmets and what sort of people get into accidents. It can be argued
    > that a helmet does not really provide any protection. But does anyone
    > argue that a helmet is the cause of injury? I don't think so.


    Sadly, some on here DO say that. Can you say zealotry?

    > So
    > using a helmet won't hurt you, and possibly will help. I think I'll
    > wear one.


    Me too.
     
  18. POHB

    POHB Guest

    "Bestest Handsander" <[email protected]> wrote
    > My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish
    > provided that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no brain
    > damage or permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries are
    > sustained, I am instructed that I should die.
    >
    > So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    > agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?


    Get her to decide
     
  19. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Marz wrote:
    > Bestest Handsander wrote:
    >> My wife and I have an agreement that I may cycle as much as I wish
    >> provided that I recover fully from any injuries. In other words, no
    >> brain damage or permanent disablity. In the event that such injuries
    >> are sustained, I am instructed that I should die.
    >>
    >> So, my questions is... in order to live up (har har) to my end of the
    >> agreement, would I do better to wear a helmet or go hatless?

    >
    > The only reason I wear a helmet when road riding is to keep the peace
    > at home. She thinks it'll save my life and I know it's a worthless
    > piece of foam, but I can't be arsed to have the arguement so I wear
    > it.


    Styrofoam-whipped much? Be a man! Leave with it on so she sees you, then
    ditch it. (Unless, of course, you really DO think wearing a helmet might
    just be a smart thing to do?)

    Practice this phrase: "Yes, dear."

    BS
     
  20. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:

    > Do not go to the Newsgroups for answers to this question, for they
    > will tell you both no and yes.


    You may be right.
     
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