Cycle safety

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by fisher, Feb 25, 2007.

  1. fisher

    fisher Guest

    Hi
    New to all this.
    What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    what other protection?

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. fisher wrote:
    > Hi
    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    > what other protection?


    A soft padded lockable case should keep your helmet safe.
     
  3. "fisher" <ventures@hotmail.co.uk> writes:

    > Hi
    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    > what other protection?


    Get some training, keep your bike in good condition, be seen and be
    observant.

    Chris
    --
    Chris Eilbeck
     
  4. Pete Whelan

    Pete Whelan Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:
    > fisher wrote:
    >
    >> Hi
    >> New to all this.
    >> What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    >> what other protection?

    >
    >
    > A soft padded lockable case should keep your helmet safe.


    don't forget to put the helmet in the lockable case before loosing the key.
     
  5. John B

    John B Guest

    fisher wrote:

    > Hi
    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,


    Have a read of CycleCraft by John Franklin.
    Its all in there.

    > what other protection?


    A good lock is useful, and some weatherproof clothing.

    John B
     
  6. Paul Boyd

    Paul Boyd Guest

    On 25/02/2007 11:02, fisher said,
    > Hi
    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    > what other protection?


    (Runs and ducks for cover - the H-word was mentioned...)

    I think the general consensus on h**mets on this group is that you can
    wear one if you want to, but don't expect it to help much if you have an
    accident. There are, of course views, in either direction from that
    comment :)

    --
    Paul Boyd
    http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
     
  7. John B <nothing@nowhere.com>typed




    > fisher wrote:


    > > Hi
    > > New to all this.
    > > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,


    > Have a read of CycleCraft by John Franklin.
    > Its all in there.


    > > what other protection?


    > A good lock is useful, and some weatherproof clothing.


    > John B


    I'd suggest the Highway Code as well as Cyclecraft. Remember the HC is
    *advisory* unless it specifies what you MUST or MUST NOT do. Not all of
    its advice to cyclists is sound, but you should know what the advice is.

    Get training for all the family...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: helenvecht@zetnet.co.uk
    Edgware.
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    fisher wrote on 25/02/2007 11:02 +0100:
    > Hi
    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    > what other protection?


    Buy a copy of Cyclecraft by John Franklin, read it and follow the advice
    therein. http://www.cyclecraft.co.uk/

    On helmets, Malcolm Wardlaw's paper on the subject is a good
    introduction: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/321/7276/1582 and for
    more detailed information http://cyclehelmets.org or the helmets link on
    the Cyclecraft website above. Specifically for kids, the National
    Children's Bureau report is worth reading:
    http://www.ncb.org.uk/Page.asp?originx1444gb_23718458425669d91l2583383929

    High visibility clothing has not got the nickname of urban camouflage
    for no reason but reflectives at night are worth having IMO.

    Don't be tempted to ride on cycle facilities - they are much more
    dangerous in general than the roads. Keep your bike well maintained
    particularly the brakes, and get some good lights for at night to a) be
    seen and b) secondarily to see by if you are on unlit roads.

    Overall though remember that despite common perceptions, cycling is no
    more dangerous than walking.

    --
    Tony

    "...has many omissions and contains much that is apocryphal, or at least
    wildly inaccurate..."
    Douglas Adams; The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
     
  9. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    fisher wrote:

    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    > what other protection?


    Some of the locals have put together some stuff about cycling
    with/for kids: see
    http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/cyclingchild.htm

    http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/cyclesafe.htm is part of
    that site specifically addressing safety.

    In summary, *active* safety, stuff that stops you having an
    accident to start with like knowledge, awareness, skill and a
    mechanically sound bike, are the Important Bits.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "fisher" <ventures@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:1172401349.582725.327330@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...
    > Hi
    > New to all this.
    > What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    > what other protection?
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    The best way to keep as safe as possible is to read, inwardly digest & use
    the techniques in 'Cyclecraft' by John Franklin.

    See

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cyclecraft-...f=pd_ka_1/202-9385029-1379804?ie=UTF8&s=books

    or

    http://preview.tinyurl.com/29wx5o

    'Cyclecraft' forms the basis for the new national cycle training standards.
    Use it and you'll learn to cycle safely and assertively.

    Bike safety?
    1. Get a bike that fits and keep it in good working order.
    2. Learn to cycle considerately, safely & assertively (not aggressively):
    Cyclecraft. Possibly get some cycle training.
    3. Use lights front & rear when cycling in the dark or low visibility
    conditions
    4. Wear gloves. Will protect delicate skin on fingers & hands if you fall.
    5. Wearing something that is reflective at night also aids you being seen by
    other road users.
    6. Wear a lid if you want to but do not assume that by virtue of wearing a
    lid you are somehow wearing 'lid of invulnerability' that will keep you safe
    from all hazards. Lids have their uses - they are designed to offer some
    protection in low impact collisions - that is all.
    7. If you haven't cycled before/done much exercise before - start off on
    short journeys and gradually build up mileages.
    8. Wear comfortable clothing. You don't have to wear acres of Lycra in
    retina-burning colours if you don't want to, but whatever you wear, make
    sure it's comfortable. Things such as: not too tight, not chafing, not going
    to get caught in the chain or the spokes, flat seams. Consider seriously
    wearing a pair of padded cycle shorts (under your trousers if you don't
    fancy showing your Lycra clad bits to the general public). Padded cycle
    shorts *do* make a difference to comfort, especially on longer rides.
    8. Enjoy your cycling. Have fun. On the whole it's not hugely dangerous to
    cycle on roads and there are health benefits to cycling.
    9. Have fun.
    10. Did I mention have fun?


    Hope this is of use.
     
  11. Pinky

    Pinky Guest

    "wafflycat" <w*a*ff£y£cat*@£btco*nn£ect.com> wrote in message
    news:ZdWdnTNEpIXPGHzYRVnytgA@bt.com...
    >
    > "fisher" <ventures@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:1172401349.582725.327330@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...
    >> Hi
    >> New to all this.
    >> What's the latest thoughts on bike safety - kids and adults - helmets,
    >> what other protection?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>

    >
    > The best way to keep as safe as possible is to read, inwardly digest & use
    > the techniques in 'Cyclecraft' by John Franklin.
    >
    > See
    >
    > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cyclecraft-...f=pd_ka_1/202-9385029-1379804?ie=UTF8&s=books
    >
    > or
    >
    > http://preview.tinyurl.com/29wx5o
    >
    > 'Cyclecraft' forms the basis for the new national cycle training
    > standards. Use it and you'll learn to cycle safely and assertively.
    >
    > Bike safety?
    > 1. Get a bike that fits and keep it in good working order.
    > 2. Learn to cycle considerately, safely & assertively (not aggressively):
    > Cyclecraft. Possibly get some cycle training.


    < heavily snipped to save space - not to cut Helens reply>

    > 9. Have fun.
    > 10. Did I mention have fun?
    >
    >
    > Hope this is of use.
    >
    >



    I knew that Helen would produce an eminently sensible and "informationful"
    reply. Especially 9 & 10. And you will!

    I returned to cycling 4 years ago at the age of 66 after an adult life away
    from it. And my personal life, in the last 4 years, has changed beyond
    recognition. And Helen is right -- it is fun --- really -- even when it is
    horizontal rain in a head wind and the waterproofs leaks are joining up with
    the wetness of your sweat ( yes you sweat even when it is blizzarding!) --
    and you arrive at a camp site -- get the miniscule tent up and the stew on
    the spirit stove -- and suddenly it really is fun!

    I suspect that I have had more real "fun" on a day to day basis in the last
    4 years than in the previous 30! I have only ever seen one snake in England
    ( seen lots elsewhere -- even in my bungalow in Oman) and that was late last
    year alongside the river Don near Doncaster -- it moved so fast I don't know
    whether it was an adder or a grass snake.

    And your children will build up a huge amount of memories, fun,
    disasters, -- so much more than anyone else. I didn't do it with my 2
    ads -- but we travelled Europe camping everywhere in a car and had second
    class fun. If I did it again it would be by bike!
    Sunday lunch is immeasurably nicer after a 15 mile bash on the bike with
    your children -- sadly the day will come when they can beat you in a real
    sprint -- I can still beat my 9 yr old grandson James --- but I suspect
    that this will be that last year!

    Riding a bike is just fantastic -- all these w/enders spending money to go
    20, 50, 80 miles in a car when you can rediscover your own area and find so
    much pleasure on a bike

    At the end I will say that I ride mainly on the road when touring, training,
    shopping -- but here are lots of routes you can ride off road.

    I do tend to rabbit on a bit!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Sorry got a bit
    verbose!



    --
    Trevor A Panther
    In South Yorkshire,
    England, United Kingdom.
    www.tapan.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
     
  12. MJ Ray

    MJ Ray Guest

    Tony Raven <junk@raven-family.com> wrote: [...]
    > Don't be tempted to ride on cycle facilities - they are much more
    > dangerous in general than the roads. [...]


    Bah! Use the good ones (mostly medium-to-long-distance car-free bypasses,
    contraflow lanes and no-motor-vehicles entries) and avoid the bad ones
    (most shared-use pavements and ones with fences littering the entrance).

    You'll soon learn whether any near you are any good and for a spotter's
    guide to bad ones, browse
    http://www.warringtoncyclecampaign.co.uk/facility-of-the-month
    - I'm rather surprised none of the crap I've discovered in Bristol so
    far seems to have appeared there.
    --
    MJ Ray - see/vidu http://mjr.towers.org.uk/email.html
    Webmaster/web developer, statistician, sysadmin, trainer, koha dev,
    online shop maker, GNU/Linux, debian, gobo, gnustep, mailing lists.
    Workers co-op @ Weston-super-Mare, Somerset http://www.ttllp.co.uk/
     
  13. MJ Ray

    MJ Ray Guest

    "wafflycat" <w*a*ff?y?cat*@?btco*nn?ect.com> wrote:
    > [...] Consider seriously
    > wearing a pair of padded cycle shorts (under your trousers if you don't
    > fancy showing your Lycra clad bits to the general public). Padded cycle
    > shorts *do* make a difference to comfort, especially on longer rides.


    But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?
    I've never liked the whole idea of special clothes for cycling and I've
    not had any discomfort since getting some sort of gel saddle (whose
    branding has now long since weathered away) when I was commuting daily.

    The other points seem mostly good ideas.
    --
    MJ Ray - see/vidu http://mjr.towers.org.uk/email.html
    Webmaster/web developer, statistician, sysadmin, trainer, koha dev,
    online shop maker, GNU/Linux, debian, gobo, gnustep, mailing lists.
    Workers co-op @ Weston-super-Mare, Somerset http://www.ttllp.co.uk/
     
  14. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "MJ Ray" <mjr@phonecoop.coop> wrote in message
    news:ersjdo$ic1$2@registered.motzarella.org...
    > "wafflycat" <w*a*ff?y?cat*@?btco*nn?ect.com> wrote:
    >> [...] Consider seriously
    >> wearing a pair of padded cycle shorts (under your trousers if you don't
    >> fancy showing your Lycra clad bits to the general public). Padded cycle
    >> shorts *do* make a difference to comfort, especially on longer rides.

    >
    > But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?
    > I've never liked the whole idea of special clothes for cycling and I've
    > not had any discomfort since getting some sort of gel saddle (whose
    > branding has now long since weathered away) when I was commuting daily.
    >
    > The other points seem mostly good ideas.


    Soft saddle does not equate to comfort. Indeed a soft saddle can be painful.
    If a soft saddle equated to comfort then the pros would be using them given
    the number of hours a day they spend in the saddle.

    The primary key to a comfortable saddle is fit. That, combined with padded
    cycle shorts, which is where the padding needs to be = comfort.
     
  15. Paul Boyd

    Paul Boyd Guest

    On 25/02/2007 18:10, MJ Ray said,

    > But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?


    I know a saddle is a very personal issue, but I've always found soft
    saddles more uncomfortable than hard saddles. Soft saddles seem to
    squish into the wrong places, whereas with a hard saddle you sit on it,
    not in it. For commuting I ride a Brooks B17 without any special
    clothing, but I do wear padded underwear on my MTB or for longer
    distance on my commuter/tourer. Not that I use my tourer for much more
    than commuting or shopping these days!

    I think the padding on a pair of Enduro liners might be a bit excessive
    though - it's like walking with a loaf of bread between your legs :)

    --
    Paul Boyd
    http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
     
  16. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    MJ Ray wrote:

    > But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?
    > I've never liked the whole idea of special clothes for cycling and I've
    > not had any discomfort since getting some sort of gel saddle (whose
    > branding has now long since weathered away) when I was commuting daily.


    I was very impressed with my first gel saddle, much better than its
    predecessor. When it finally went I thought I'd try a Brooks
    because despite being hard enough to use as an offensive weapon
    they do have a reputation for amazing comfort... A reputation I
    discovered is fully justified, with the hard Brooks being much
    better than the soft Avocet despite me thinking the Avoicet was
    really good. Turns out it's about shape more than anything else,
    and "adaptive" isn't necessarily a good thing.

    I wouldn't like to cycle all day on one of my 3 Brooks saddles
    without padded shorts, but most of my cycling journeys are less
    than that and it's certainly not necessary to wear padding on
    shorter jaunts. Which suits me because I can't be bothered to
    change into special clothes for a quick hack either. Up to about
    10 miles I don't even think about it, over 10 I'd probably take the
    recumbent where it's a non-issue in any case. Mainly use the
    padded shorts on the unicycle.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  17. John Kane

    John Kane Guest

    On Feb 25, 1:10 pm, MJ Ray <m...@phonecoop.coop> wrote:
    > "wafflycat" <w*a*ff?y?cat*@?btco*nn?ect.com> wrote:
    > > [...] Consider seriously
    > > wearing a pair of padded cycle shorts (under your trousers if you don't
    > > fancy showing your Lycra clad bits to the general public). Padded cycle
    > > shorts *do* make a difference to comfort, especially on longer rides.

    >
    > But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?
    > I've never liked the whole idea of special clothes for cycling and I've
    > not had any discomfort since getting some sort of gel saddle (whose
    > branding has now long since weathered away) when I was commuting daily.


    Yes.

    Or, for a longer answer, specialized bicycle clothing is just that.
    Specialized for cycling and we ,as cyclists, have had roughly 150 or
    so years to get it right or closer to right than riding in street
    clothes. There are reasons that people wear the stuff and it is not
    just to look flashy. I tend to look like a green and yellow bumblebee
    in full kit but the comfort is well worth it.

    For short distances (2-35km ) it really does not seem to matter what
    you wear but on longer rides, and here I'd say anything over 10km, the
    specialized clothing really begins to pay off.

    Tight-fitting cycling clothes have less wind resistance, the shorts
    really are more comfortable than your normal y-fronts or thong. Most
    cycling clothes wick better which can be very important in very hot or
    cold weather. Cycling shoes give better support when on the
    bicycle. The jackets and jerseys with the scalloped backs keep you a
    lot warmer than when you're riding with half your back naked. And keep
    the mud off if you don't have fenders.

    For anything under the said 10 km I usually don't bother if I need to
    be in street clothes at the other end. Still I have walked into my
    local pub and been stared at because I was in a suit and tie. But it
    was on my 10 km commute and I had a shower and change facilities at
    work. :)

    John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
     
  18. Buck

    Buck Guest

    On 2007-02-25 20:34:42 +0000, Peter Clinch <p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk> said:

    > MJ Ray wrote:
    >
    >> But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?
    >> I've never liked the whole idea of special clothes for cycling and I've
    >> not had any discomfort since getting some sort of gel saddle (whose
    >> branding has now long since weathered away) when I was commuting daily.

    >
    > I was very impressed with my first gel saddle, much better than its
    > predecessor. When it finally went I thought I'd try a Brooks because
    > despite being hard enough to use as an offensive weapon they do have a
    > reputation for amazing comfort... A reputation I discovered is fully
    > justified, with the hard Brooks being much better than the soft Avocet
    > despite me thinking the Avoicet was really good. Turns out it's about
    > shape more than anything else, and "adaptive" isn't necessarily a good
    > thing.
    >
    > I wouldn't like to cycle all day on one of my 3 Brooks saddles without
    > padded shorts, but most of my cycling journeys are less than that and
    > it's certainly not necessary to wear padding on shorter jaunts. Which
    > suits me because I can't be bothered to change into special clothes for
    > a quick hack either. Up to about 10 miles I don't even think about it,
    > over 10 I'd probably take the recumbent where it's a non-issue in any
    > case. Mainly use the padded shorts on the unicycle.
    >
    > Pete.


    There is no substitute for a nice hammock seat.
    --
    Three wheels good, two wheels ok

    www.catrike.co.uk
     
  19. Rob Morley

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <ersjdn$ic1$1@registered.motzarella.org>, MJ Ray
    mjr@phonecoop.coop says...

    > You'll soon learn whether any near you are any good and for a spotter's
    > guide to bad ones, browse
    > http://www.warringtoncyclecampaign.co.uk/facility-of-the-month
    > - I'm rather surprised none of the crap I've discovered in Bristol so
    > far seems to have appeared there.
    >

    You know what to do about that, don't you? :)
     
  20. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <ersjdo$ic1$2@registered.motzarella.org>, MJ Ray
    ('mjr@phonecoop.coop') wrote:

    > "wafflycat" <w*a*ff?y?cat*@?btco*nn?ect.com> wrote:
    >> [...] Consider seriously
    >> wearing a pair of padded cycle shorts (under your trousers if you don't
    >> fancy showing your Lycra clad bits to the general public). Padded cycle
    >> shorts *do* make a difference to comfort, especially on longer rides.

    >
    > But do they give any benefit over using a good adaptive soft saddle?


    Yes. Adaptive soft saddles cause injuries and make you sterile.

    --
    simon@jasmine.org.uk (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Tony Blair's epitaph, #1: Tony Blair lies here.
    Tony Blair's epitaph, #2: Trust me.
     
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