actionbent part2

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Duram, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Duram

    Duram Guest

    I´m planning to buy one but as I live in Brazil I need to know in how many
    boxes
    the Actionbent comes and what are the boxes sizes and weight so I can figure
    how much it will be to ship to Brazil, I´m planning to delivery in a friend
    house in
    US an then mail here.
    For those who bought it please send me details about their boxes, thanks.


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    Tags:


  2. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    I'm curious...why don't you just ask the seller??


    Duram wrote:
    > I´m planning to buy one but as I live in Brazil I need to know in how many
    > boxes
    > the Actionbent comes and what are the boxes sizes and weight so I can figure
    > how much it will be to ship to Brazil, I´m planning to delivery in a friend
    > house in
    > US an then mail here.
    > For those who bought it please send me details about their boxes, thanks.
    >
    >
    > --
    > NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth
     
  3. Duram

    Duram Guest

    I did but no answer until now....

    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    I'm curious...why don't you just ask the seller??


    Duram wrote:
    > I´m planning to buy one but as I live in Brazil I need to know in how many
    > boxes
    > the Actionbent comes and what are the boxes sizes and weight so I can

    figure
    > how much it will be to ship to Brazil, I´m planning to delivery in a

    friend
    > house in
    > US an then mail here.
    > For those who bought it please send me details about their boxes, thanks.
    >
    >
    > --
    > NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth



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  4. Mick

    Mick Guest

    Duram wrote:
    > I did but no answer until now....
    >
    > "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > I'm curious...why don't you just ask the seller??
    >
    >
    > Duram wrote:
    >
    >>I´m planning to buy one but as I live in Brazil I need to know in how many
    >>boxes
    >>the Actionbent comes and what are the boxes sizes and weight so I can

    >
    > figure
    >
    >>how much it will be to ship to Brazil, I´m planning to delivery in a

    >
    > friend
    >
    >>house in
    >>US an then mail here.
    >>For those who bought it please send me details about their boxes, thanks.
    >>
    >>
    >>--
    >>NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth

    >
    >
    > I just ordered and received my bike from Actionbent. I ordered it on a Friday


    and received it on Thursday. It would have been here a day earlier but UPS

    routed it wrong. That's not bad for being shipped across country. It
    comes in one box.
     
  5. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Mick wrote:
    > I just ordered and received my bike from Actionbent. I ordered it on a Friday
    >
    > and received it on Thursday. It would have been here a day earlier but UPS
    >
    > routed it wrong. That's not bad for being shipped across country. It
    > comes in one box.




    Glad it ain't just me -- my HP Velo SMGTe was somehow "overlooked" by
    BAX Global, so it won't arrive until tomorrow afternoon.
     
  6. Duram

    Duram Guest

    I just got my answers from the dealer, no more doubts.
    I think I´ll order mine very soon, I hope your bike is ok and
    nice to ride after a long trip.
    tell us a review about your new bike, is it good?




    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Mick wrote:
    > > I just ordered and received my bike from Actionbent. I ordered it on a

    Friday
    > >
    > > and received it on Thursday. It would have been here a day earlier but

    UPS
    > >
    > > routed it wrong. That's not bad for being shipped across country. It
    > > comes in one box.

    >
    >
    >
    > Glad it ain't just me -- my HP Velo SMGTe was somehow "overlooked" by
    > BAX Global, so it won't arrive until tomorrow afternoon.
    >



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  7. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Duram wrote:
    > I just got my answers from the dealer, no more doubts.
    > I think I´ll order mine very soon, I hope your bike is ok and
    > nice to ride after a long trip.
    > tell us a review about your new bike, is it good?



    Thanks for the well wishes -- my bike came in very good condition. You
    do realize I bought an HP Velo SMGTe, right? There was a small scratch
    the size of two commas or periods in an out of the way place, but
    otherwise everything looks shiny and new.

    Only problem is, it's too big!

    I mean, the chain and boom...my x-seam is indeed 42" but I need to lose
    another three inches so that I don't lock my knees and "tiptoe" on the
    pedals -- and even then, not really!

    @#$*%^&!!!!!

    There's a guy at work who volunteers as a Ride Marshal every year at
    the big Five Borough Bike Tour...I'm gonna ask him if he is any good at
    cutting a chain.

    I'll be starting a new thread on the bike once I've put in some miles
    on flats and hills, in parks and on streets, alone and with traffic, by
    day and night! Can't wait.

    God this is getting a bit anti-climactic here....
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > Only problem is, it's too big!
    > I mean, the chain and boom...my x-seam is indeed 42" but I need to lose
    > another three inches so that I don't lock my knees and "tiptoe" on the
    > pedals -- and even then, not really!
    >
    > @#$*%^&!!!!!


    The boom is secured by a couple of bolts. Undo them and slide the boom
    in until it's the right length for you. You'll probably need to take a
    bit of slack out of the chain: undo the Powerlink, take off a few links
    from the end and then try again until the gears are running smoothly in
    all the extreme ratios.

    x-seam isn't very relevant to the Streetmachine unless you're very, very
    tall or particularly short.

    > There's a guy at work who volunteers as a Ride Marshal every year at
    > the big Five Borough Bike Tour...I'm gonna ask him if he is any good at
    > cutting a chain.


    Get a Park Tools mini chain tool. They're designed to be foolproof and
    IME of setting up an SMGT chain (I put a new one on last month, made
    from about 2.4 standard chains) they've managed their design goal. And
    you'll have a good chain tool for the future.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > The boom is secured by a couple of bolts. Undo them and slide the boom
    > in until it's the right length for you. You'll probably need to take a
    > bit of slack out of the chain: undo the Powerlink, take off a few links
    > from the end and then try again until the gears are running smoothly in
    > all the extreme ratios.


    Boom adjustment doesn't have me worried -- it's all the issues with
    doing the chain...tension, length, and strength...I don't want to not
    do something right and have a catastrophic, if not also fatal, failure
    some time later....

    There's a bike shop nearby but the guy on the phone sounded like a
    drone and very bored (another LBS with an attitude problem).
    Interestingly, he said cutting a chain is only $5. I would have
    thought it'd be a bit more, seeing how it's probably as annoying as
    fixing flats.

    Still, I'm intrigued...it seems simple enough...find the Powerlink,
    undo, remove another few links, redo Powerlink, and voilà, ç'est ca!

    > x-seam isn't very relevant to the Streetmachine unless you're very, very
    > tall or particularly short.


    Huh???? How's that possible????

    X-seam determines how much to telescope the boom, which in turn
    determines chain length, etc.

    > Get a Park Tools mini chain tool. They're designed to be foolproof and
    > IME of setting up an SMGT chain (I put a new one on last month, made
    > from about 2.4 standard chains) they've managed their design goal. And
    > you'll have a good chain tool for the future.


    I'll get one, then, for the future.

    But in the here and now, I've got the chain tool on the Topeak Alien II
    Folding Multi-Tool ("Swiss Army Knife"). Is that adequate?

    My real problem is expertise. Haven't ever done this, and don't want
    to make a bigger mess of things.

    I wanna ride already, damn it!

    But sure enough, it's rain and threat of rain this weekend.

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > Boom adjustment doesn't have me worried -- it's all the issues with
    > doing the chain...tension, length, and strength...I don't want to not
    > do something right and have a catastrophic, if not also fatal, failure
    > some time later....


    Shorten the boom first and see how your gears do. If they're skipping a
    bit on the small chainwheel you need more tension, so a shorter chain.
    According to how much the boom shortened, take out almost as much chain
    and try again. Continue tweaking until the gears work smoothly at top
    and bottom ends.

    Strength is a non-issue. As long as you use a decent chain tool like
    the Park one you can't appreciably weaken anything and the rivets will
    be set in at the right place automagically.

    So no reason for a failure later, and you'll know how to do it next time
    and have the tool for the job if you /do/ have a failure.

    > There's a bike shop nearby but the guy on the phone sounded like a
    > drone and very bored (another LBS with an attitude problem).
    > Interestingly, he said cutting a chain is only $5. I would have
    > thought it'd be a bit more, seeing how it's probably as annoying as
    > fixing flats.


    It takes, oooh, several whole seconds to break it in the first place
    (whether using the Powerlink you have or in any link with a chain tool),
    and a few more to knock out the surplus bit, and a few more to connect
    the ends back together. No parts needed, just a few seconds doing up
    the tool. You can have the foolproof tool for not a huge amount more
    than it'll cost to have it done for you.

    > Still, I'm intrigued...it seems simple enough...find the Powerlink,
    > undo, remove another few links, redo Powerlink, and voilà, ç'est ca!


    Yes, it really is that easy. And since the chain's new finding the
    Powerlink will be very easy as well... The key to undoing the
    Powerlink, btw, is to squeeze the opposite plates together at the same
    time you push the ends towards one another.

    >> x-seam isn't very relevant to the Streetmachine unless you're very, very
    >> tall or particularly short.

    >
    > Huh???? How's that possible????
    > X-seam determines how much to telescope the boom, which in turn
    > determines chain length, etc.


    But you don't need to measure anything, just leave it loose after
    pushing it in, sit on it, push it out to where you want it with your
    feet on the pedals, make sure the crank is vertical, do up the bolts.
    One perfectly set boom, no need to have any idea what your x-seam is.

    > But in the here and now, I've got the chain tool on the Topeak Alien II
    > Folding Multi-Tool ("Swiss Army Knife"). Is that adequate?


    Yes, but it probably doesn't automatically limit the end-point so
    without a bit of practice re-insertions of the pins can be slightly off
    and result in a stiff chain. Just a case of fiddling with it back and
    forth until it's right, but without the practice a real mechanic gets
    it's easier to have one that sets things right like the Park one.
    That's why I got the Park one.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Thanks for the advice, Pete, but I lack the very context necessary in
    which to put your remarks...for example, I don't even know how to undo
    a chain link!

    But I get the sense that the job is indeed an easy one, so I guess I'm
    going to spend tonight reading up on things. This site looks like it
    might help: <http://www.breckcycling.com/>.

    Thanks for the encouragement!



    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > Shorten the boom first and see how your gears do. If they're skipping a
    > bit on the small chainwheel you need more tension, so a shorter chain.
    > According to how much the boom shortened, take out almost as much chain
    > and try again. Continue tweaking until the gears work smoothly at top
    > and bottom ends.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > So no reason for a failure later, and you'll know how to do it next time
    > and have the tool for the job if you /do/ have a failure.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > It takes, oooh, several whole seconds to break it in the first place
    > (whether using the Powerlink you have or in any link with a chain tool),
    > and a few more to knock out the surplus bit, and a few more to connect
    > the ends back together. No parts needed, just a few seconds doing up
    > the tool. You can have the foolproof tool for not a huge amount more
    > than it'll cost to have it done for you.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > Yes, it really is that easy. And since the chain's new finding the
    > Powerlink will be very easy as well... The key to undoing the
    > Powerlink, btw, is to squeeze the opposite plates together at the same
    > time you push the ends towards one another.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > But you don't need to measure anything, just leave it loose after
    > pushing it in, sit on it, push it out to where you want it with your
    > feet on the pedals, make sure the crank is vertical, do up the bolts.
    > One perfectly set boom, no need to have any idea what your x-seam is.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > Yes, but it probably doesn't automatically limit the end-point so
    > without a bit of practice re-insertions of the pins can be slightly off
    > and result in a stiff chain. Just a case of fiddling with it back and
    > forth until it's right, but without the practice a real mechanic gets
    > it's easier to have one that sets things right like the Park one.
    > That's why I got the Park one.
    >
    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    > Thanks for the advice, Pete, but I lack the very context necessary in
    > which to put your remarks...for example, I don't even know how to undo
    > a chain link!
    > But I get the sense that the job is indeed an easy one, so I guess I'm
    > going to spend tonight reading up on things. This site looks like it
    > might help: <http://www.breckcycling.com/>.


    http://www.parktool.com/repair/ is Park's own site which is pretty
    good IME for tweaks and twiddles.

    There's also a limited "how to" on the packet on the Park models
    I've seen.

    > Thanks for the encouragement!


    I know I needed some myself to get on with chains (and bottom
    brackets too), but it really is pretty easy. If you can dig up any
    old bit of tat chain (bike shop reject, local dumpster) to practice
    on then you can be sure you won't miss when it comes to the Shiny
    One! ;-)

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > http://www.parktool.com/repair/ is Park's own site which is pretty
    > good IME for tweaks and twiddles.
    >
    > There's also a limited "how to" on the packet on the Park models
    > I've seen.


    Nice!

    But again, I lack the basic context necessary for such information to
    be really meaningful.

    So in the interests of expediency, I chickened out. =)

    Damned glad I did, too, because it took the mechanic a good twenty
    minutes of fiddling!

    > I know I needed some myself to get on with chains (and bottom
    > brackets too), but it really is pretty easy. If you can dig up any
    > old bit of tat chain (bike shop reject, local dumpster) to practice
    > on then you can be sure you won't miss when it comes to the Shiny
    > One! ;-)


    Well, I kept the cut chain links and will be practicing, all right!

    But my chain "sticks" on the "aftermath" -- once it's made the round of
    the biggest front gear, it tends to "stick" onto that gear and follow
    it back around again! This only happens on the biggest front gear and
    the smallest rear gear for some reason...will need to visit them again
    soon! But I'm glad I went, as those guys were cool (actually, 99% of
    bike mechanics have been cool, if not 99% proficient 99% of the time)
    and I expect to see them for other needs in the future.

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  14. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > Damned glad I did, too, because it took the mechanic a good twenty
    > minutes of fiddling!


    Oh dear. I'd regard him with quite a bit of suspicion, to be
    honest! ;-/ When testing 'bents at Ligfietswinkel in Amsterdam the
    owner cut and remade chains as needed for customers to try bikes.
    He had it down to about 20 seconds. Now, practice makes perfect,
    and /I/ certainly couldn't do it that fast, but 20 minutes to
    shorten a chain? There just isn't any excuse.

    > But my chain "sticks" on the "aftermath" -- once it's made the round of
    > the biggest front gear, it tends to "stick" onto that gear and follow
    > it back around again!


    If the chain itself is running smoothly with no stiff links this is
    likely to be derailleur adjustment, I'd guess.

    > soon! But I'm glad I went, as those guys were cool (actually, 99% of
    > bike mechanics have been cool, if not 99% proficient 99% of the time)


    But again I gasp in horror... 20 minutes to shorten a chain!? :-0

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  15. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > Oh dear. I'd regard him with quite a bit of suspicion, to be
    > honest! ;-/ When testing 'bents at Ligfietswinkel in Amsterdam the
    > owner cut and remade chains as needed for customers to try bikes.
    > He had it down to about 20 seconds. Now, practice makes perfect,
    > and /I/ certainly couldn't do it that fast, but 20 minutes to
    > shorten a chain? There just isn't any excuse.


    I do (regard the mechanic hesitantly), because he seemed to be the kind
    of backyard mechanic my friends are -- "good enough for government"
    quality work: I told him there was a gold-colored link in the chain,
    but he just undid it somewhere arbitrarily, and while joining the chain
    again he didn't use the chain tool at first, but a regular
    whachamacallit, that hand-held "vice" with the scissor-like
    construction...while shortening the boom he used a rubber mallet but
    still no cloth over the bike until at my suggestion...little things
    like this.

    But, to be fair, a good quarter of the time he was struggling to get
    the chain back through the teflon tubing since the whole line slipped
    off. =) And he hadn't worked on recumbents before, so perhaps the
    novelty of it all, even though a chain is a chain is a chain, had him a
    bit distracted.

    > If the chain itself is running smoothly with no stiff links this is
    > likely to be derailleur adjustment, I'd guess.


    What's a "stiff" link?

    I'd never had a chain follow the chain ring back up, ever!

    > But again I gasp in horror... 20 minutes to shorten a chain!? :-0


    Yeah, and I'm really not exaggerating. But I am referring to the whole
    process involved, from undoing to redoing, and at least 25% of the time
    was spent trying to "thread" the chain back through the teflon tubes
    and underneath the idler (that big flywheel, right?).

    Nothing compared to 20 seconds, for sure, but certainly far better than
    I would've been able to do, not having heard of chain tools until just
    yesterday! And now, having seen it once, I at least have the framework
    against which to gauge my own attempts.

    Yep, I always knew a 'bent was gonna mean hands-on...just didn't expect
    it quite so soon!

    What's the fastest you can run yours on the flats?

    At the middle gears (front and back), I seem able only to acheive 16-17
    mph! This is what I do leisurely cruising along on my DF!!!

    I do have on them Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires, though....

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  16. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    >
    > <SNIP>
    >
    >
    > and while joining the chain
    > again he didn't use the chain tool at first, but a regular
    > whachamacallit, that hand-held "vice" with the scissor-like
    > construction...



    AKA "pliers."

    (How embarrassing!)
     
  17. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > I do (regard the mechanic hesitantly)


    <snip>

    So why say he seems cool and you'll be back? Doesn't seem to scan...

    > What's a "stiff" link?


    Just what it says: links should move completely freely, but a stiff
    chain link has marked reluctance in pivoting relative to its neighbour.

    > Yeah, and I'm really not exaggerating. But I am referring to the whole
    > process involved, from undoing to redoing, and at least 25% of the time
    > was spent trying to "thread" the chain back through the teflon tubes
    > and underneath the idler (that big flywheel, right?).


    So we're still at 15 minutes to break a chain in a couple of places and
    pop it back together, which is still not very good.

    > What's the fastest you can run yours on the flats?


    No idea, I don't have a speedo and I'm not really that interested.

    > At the middle gears (front and back), I seem able only to acheive 16-17
    > mph! This is what I do leisurely cruising along on my DF!!!


    If you want to go faster, that's what the Speedmachine is for...

    > I do have on them Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires, though....


    Shouldn't be /that/ much slower than the plain Marathons I use. Make
    sure they're running at 100 psi.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  18. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > So why say he seems cool and you'll be back? Doesn't seem to scan...


    He still knows more than me! And when I say "cool," I mean that I can
    ask why he's doing something, and suggest some other way of doing
    things, and he ain't offended...very easy-going personality. I can ask
    questions, learn, and he didn't seem to mind. Of course, I keep it
    respectful, too. I don't bother him with constant questions. But I
    just get the sense I'm not dealing with a frustrated amateur racer,
    know what I mean? Who'd rather be doing the Tour de France and instead
    has to humor a dummy who has no mechanical inclinations at all....

    > Just what it says: links should move completely freely, but a stiff
    > chain link has marked reluctance in pivoting relative to its neighbour.


    Yes, I've since found a picture that "explains" it perfectly.

    > So we're still at 15 minutes to break a chain in a couple of places and
    > pop it back together, which is still not very good.


    No, I guess not...I didn't know how long it was supposed to take. But
    surely you exaggerate with your claim of 20 seconds! Fixing a flat is
    like five minutes, and surely cutting a chain (and then making sure
    it's working right thereafter) is at least five minutes, too?

    > No idea, I don't have a speedo and I'm not really that interested.


    I just hope I'm not more than 3 mph behind my DF on the flats -- bad as
    that is (a mile is like 20 NYC blocks...3 mph less would make me a
    whole neigbhorhood or two behind after an hour!).

    > If you want to go faster, that's what the Speedmachine is for...


    I seriously doubt the SpeedMachine is that much faster...it's certainly
    the same damned weight! Yes it's even more reclined, but no big deal.

    I can't wait for HP Velotechnik's new machines...I'm guessing it'll be
    another year or two....

    > Shouldn't be /that/ much slower than the plain Marathons I use. Make
    > sure they're running at 100 psi.


    Oddly enough, the tires say that maximum psi is 70-lbs.!!!

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > No, I guess not...I didn't know how long it was supposed to take. But
    > surely you exaggerate with your claim of 20 seconds!


    I wasn't timing him, but I think that's a fair guesstimate. What you
    have to do is wind in a lever 3 times (once for each end of the break,
    once to reconnect the two ends.

    > Fixing a flat is
    > like five minutes, and surely cutting a chain (and then making sure
    > it's working right thereafter) is at least five minutes, too?


    Fixing a flat generally means removing the wheel, unseating the tyre,
    removing the inner tube, putting in a new one, reseating the tyre,
    replacing the wheel, reinflating the tyre. That's a much bigger to-do
    list than doing up lever to remove one pin, removing another, popping
    one pin back in.

    >> If you want to go faster, that's what the Speedmachine is for...

    >
    > I seriously doubt the SpeedMachine is that much faster...it's certainly
    > the same damned weight! Yes it's even more reclined, but no big deal.


    No, very big deal indeed. At 18 mph about 80% of your power is
    overcoming air resistance, and there's significantly less frontal area
    to catch the wind on a Speedmachine. There's a clue in the name!

    > Oddly enough, the tires say that maximum psi is 70-lbs.!!!


    I'd assumed, incorrectly as it turned out, that the M+ would be the same
    dimensions as the plain Marathon, but looking at the specs they are
    fatter and run at lower pressures. So they will probably be slowing you
    down :-(

    For a still reasonably puncture proof and capable touring tyre a swicth
    from the 1.75" M+ to the 1.5" Marathon running at higher pressure will
    probably help you with rolling resistance and hence speed you up.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > I wasn't timing him, but I think that's a fair guesstimate. What you
    > have to do is wind in a lever 3 times (once for each end of the break,
    > once to reconnect the two ends.
    >
    >
    > Fixing a flat generally means removing the wheel, unseating the tyre,
    > removing the inner tube, putting in a new one, reseating the tyre,
    > replacing the wheel, reinflating the tyre. That's a much bigger to-do
    > list than doing up lever to remove one pin, removing another, popping
    > one pin back in.


    But you've got to check the gears, too, afterwards, to make sure
    they're shifting right and all. I don't think they did too much of
    this, though...he probably checked for half a minute!

    > No, very big deal indeed. At 18 mph about 80% of your power is
    > overcoming air resistance, and there's significantly less frontal area
    > to catch the wind on a Speedmachine. There's a clue in the name!


    Now now, we all know about names and marketing...but I didn't know 80%
    of effort expended in on behalf of air resistance! Still, my point is
    that I should be at least as good as a DF, given my better aerodynamics
    on the SMGTe, but that's not been the case so far...even given my
    Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires, the hit seems too big...I can only hope
    it's a matter of developing the muscles and riding technique, as well
    as those nagging chain issues (chain hop, chain suck, stiff shifting,
    no shifting...it's rideable, but not smoothly so, especially for a new
    machine with brand new components).

    > I'd assumed, incorrectly as it turned out, that the M+ would be the same
    > dimensions as the plain Marathon, but looking at the specs they are
    > fatter and run at lower pressures. So they will probably be slowing you
    > down :-(
    >
    > For a still reasonably puncture proof and capable touring tyre a swicth
    > from the 1.75" M+ to the 1.5" Marathon running at higher pressure will
    > probably help you with rolling resistance and hence speed you up.


    Yes, I knew this going in, but I figured that I'd rather have more
    puncture-proof or puncture-resistance than speed, if the penalty isn't
    too large and way out of proportion.

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
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