Does Speeding Apply To Cycling?



Thanks! It was un-nerving staring down the barrels of a pair of revolvers knowing that the police can kill you, however unlikely the odds, and get away with it ("He made a furtive move! I had to get it on!").

Later in the ride I was probably busting up in laughter.

The one detail that got me out of the jam was that my 'twin brother' the murder suspect had on glasses with only one cross bar for a nose bride. My glasses had two bars.

Whew!
 
That's a good question. I know DUI's do. But DUI's also apply to people on riding lawn mowers, golf carts, and horses around here.
 
Quote by kana_marie:
"But DUI's also apply to people on riding lawn mowers, golf carts, and horses around here."

...and beer for the horses!
 
Horses too? I never knew that, I thought it had to be a motorized vehicle so that we receive a DUI, I guess it's just a vehicle? A horse applies? :D
 
Gel,
you can be charged with non-motor vehicle under the influence. it's rare Gel but it does happen!
the statute states ;prohibits the operation of a non-motorized vehicle (a vehicle that is not a motor vehicle) while under the influence of intoxicants or substance which may impair a person’s driving ability. That includes, those who are riding horses, bicycles, skateboards, etc.
 
In Tenn. they charge the horse.

Here in Ohio we have had multiple incidents in which Amish men have been arrested for DUI while passed out behind the wheel reins of their buggies as the horse knew the way home and was travelling along with no human control or input.

There was one such case that ended in a low-speed pursuit and the horse and buggy slammed into love tapped a police cruiser.

It's all fun & games until someone texts and crashes dad's buggy during Rumspringa!
 
jhuskey said:
The laws do vary depending on the jurisdiction.
In Massachusetts, you can only be charged if you're operating what is defined as a "motor vehicle" by law. Which doesn't include bicycles.

Also, the operation has to take place on what the law defines as a "public way". You'd be shocked to learn how many times a judge has had to toss a case because the prosecutor forgot to establish operation on a public way at the trial. ;)
 
Some of the legislature here are trying to make it a DUI offense if you are caught in a private driveway above the legal limit. I do not see it passing.
 
Even if the law defines DUI/DWI as only applying to motorized vehicles, the long arm of the law can cite for drunk & disorderly, public intoxication, public endangerment or...something.

In Ohio, bicycles are legally treated as a motor vehicle if operated on public roads.
 
Prostitution is even illegal here. Down right primitive and backwards.
 
Quote by JH:
"Some of the legislature here are trying to make it a DUI offense if you are caught in a private driveway above the legal limit. I do not see it passing."

Ohio already has that. If you pass out in your car after leaving the bar at 2:30 AM on a cold winter night...better make sure you sleep it off with the keys hidden in some shrubbery!

I **** you not! People have been convicted of DUI with the keys in their pockets (vehicle obviously not running to keep them warm!) while sleeping off a bender in a parking lot. Just having the keys inside the vehicle has been equated to "driving".

I'm staunchly opposed to drunk driving, but the MADD loons and courts have gone a bit overboard IMO.
 
The otherpiece of wisdom is an open container law whereby even if the driver is not drinking ,for instance a designated driver ,he can be charged with open container unless the container is locked away. Probably won't.
 
jhuskey said:
Some of the legislature here are trying to make it a DUI offense if you are caught in a private driveway above the legal limit. I do not see it passing.
I do find hard that DUI is a offense in a private driveway, I mean, it's private, so how can anyone be charged for this if they are in their private property?
 
That's a very interesting question you've posed! I feel like it would be difficult to enforce a cyclist speeding as many law enforcement officers are more focused on speeding cars. However, if it is a question of safety, I'm sure a police office wouldn't hesitate to pull over a cyclist going way too fast.
 
CAMPYBOB said:
Even if the law defines DUI/DWI as only applying to motorized vehicles, the long arm of the law can cite for drunk & disorderly, public intoxication, public endangerment or...something.
They can charge, but often, what is "intoxicated" under those laws is *********, hammered, falling-down drunk. Not a BAC of .08 or higher.

Of course, if you were to crash into a lamp post at the first right turn, and the responding cops found you in a bleeding heap laughing your ass off, that would pretty much meet that standard. :D
 
Jennifer Abernathy said:
That's a very interesting question you've posed! I feel like it would be difficult to enforce a cyclist speeding as many law enforcement officers are more focused on speeding cars. However, if it is a question of safety, I'm sure a police office wouldn't hesitate to pull over a cyclist going way too fast.
Where I live, you'd probably have to be riding like a total jerk, and disrupting a parade or some kind of charity event.

The main street of my town has a 25 mph limit for maybe a 1/4 mile of the business district, and then it goes to 35, which pretty much makes it academic for me. Even the 25 section is iffy if there's any kind of a head or cross wind. Almost every other street I ride on is 35 mph or more.

The only time I've ever been yelled at for riding too fast was by some officious, self-important park ranger, who I coasted by at a breakneck speed of 12 mph. She was easy to ignore. Those rangers have no enforcement authority. ;)
 
Yes, I believe you can get ticketed for speeding on a bike. A bike is a vehicle, just like a car or a motorcycle. Logically, it should follow similar (or the same) rules as cars then as it is classified similarly. From some of the posts above you can see that you can indeed get pulled over for biking too quickly. Honestly though, for the most part, you should be absolutely fine. If you can even reach some speed limits (like 35mph) then I consider that more of a success than breaking the law. Happy riding!
 
Our Rangers and Game Wardens are sworn LEO's. They are armed and have arrest powers.

Matter of fact, our Game Wardens have more powers than our Deputy Sheriff's (but, not the powers of 'the' County Sheriff. He is the highest authority under our law enforcement system in any individual county.).

Federal, Ohio Municipal Park Rangers and Ohio State Park Rangers may well be armed, as are our ODNR Game Wardens.

Add to that our well-dressed (our silver-gray Dodge Charger's were voted 'best looking' SHP cars in the nation! Woohoo!) Ohio State Highway Patrol and a couple other agencies and we are well policed and ready to deliver a smack down to speeding hooligans on bicycles!
 

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