Dura-Ace spd-sl maintenance

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Francesco Devittori, Jan 27, 2006.

  1. Hi all,

    what kind of maintenance do dura-ace spd-sl pedals require?
    I'm using a pair of them since about 18 months, I notice that the black
    plastic insert is worn, but what about bearings?

    Thanks,
    Francesco
     
    Tags:


  2. Hi all,

    what kind of maintenance do dura-ace spd-sl pedals require?
    I'm using a pair of them since about 18 months, I notice that the black
    plastic insert is worn, but what about bearings?

    Thanks,
    Francesco
     
  3. spin156

    spin156 Guest

    Francesco Devittori wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > what kind of maintenance do dura-ace spd-sl pedals require?
    > I'm using a pair of them since about 18 months, I notice that the black
    > plastic insert is worn, but what about bearings?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Francesco


    Here is an article on SPD pedal maintenance:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/fix/?id=shimano_pedals

    SPD and SPD-SL types are pretty much the same as each other as far as
    the axle and bearing mechanism. This article shows you how to
    disassemble them and just add new grease. Personally, I take them
    apart completely and clean everything completely. This takes a lot
    of patience as there are 24 3/32" loose balls in each pedal (two sets
    of 12). It takes me about 45 minutes to completely disassemble,
    clean, grease, and re-assemble one pedal. It's a good winter or
    rainy day project. I do mine about once a year. The one
    special tool you need is the Shimano TL-40. There are a couple of
    other flat open end wrenches you need and you can use a small socket
    for the lock nut on the end. You service these just like any other
    loose ball bearing set. I also find that an axle vise makes life
    much easier to hold the whole thing. Set up over a big rag or in
    some kind of a box, as you are guaranteed to drop at least a couple of
    those tiny little balls. The last thing you do is to make sure
    the tiny rubber seal (it's not an o-ring, but similar) is seated down
    in the plastic housing as far as you can get it.
    This is what keeps the dirt out of the bearings and it tends to float
    away from the plastic housing. Hold the pedal in your hand and
    rotate it around the axle, and, at the same time, push that little seal
    down into the plastic housing with a fingernail. Once I figured
    out what this did and started keeping it pushed in, my bearings stay a
    lot cleaner. As with all bearings, if you submerge them in water,
    they are going to need a more aggressive maintenance schedule.

    I know this sounds like a lot of work, but for most of us DuraAce
    pedals are pretty expensive and once you learn how to do this job it's
    pretty easy. It just takes time and a lot of patience. A
    steady hand and a good pair of tweezers help, too.
     
  4. spin156

    spin156 Guest

    Francesco Devittori wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > what kind of maintenance do dura-ace spd-sl pedals require?
    > I'm using a pair of them since about 18 months, I notice that the black
    > plastic insert is worn, but what about bearings?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Francesco


    Here is an article on SPD pedal maintenance:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/fix/?id=shimano_pedals

    SPD and SPD-SL types are pretty much the same as each other as far as
    the axle and bearing mechanism. This article shows you how to
    disassemble them and just add new grease. Personally, I take them
    apart completely and clean everything completely. This takes a lot
    of patience as there are 24 3/32" loose balls in each pedal (two sets
    of 12). It takes me about 45 minutes to completely disassemble,
    clean, grease, and re-assemble one pedal. It's a good winter or
    rainy day project. I do mine about once a year. The one
    special tool you need is the Shimano TL-40. There are a couple of
    other flat open end wrenches you need and you can use a small socket
    for the lock nut on the end. You service these just like any other
    loose ball bearing set. I also find that an axle vise makes life
    much easier to hold the whole thing. Set up over a big rag or in
    some kind of a box, as you are guaranteed to drop at least a couple of
    those tiny little balls. The last thing you do is to make sure
    the tiny rubber seal (it's not an o-ring, but similar) is seated down
    in the plastic housing as far as you can get it.
    This is what keeps the dirt out of the bearings and it tends to float
    away from the plastic housing. Hold the pedal in your hand and
    rotate it around the axle, and, at the same time, push that little seal
    down into the plastic housing with a fingernail. Once I figured
    out what this did and started keeping it pushed in, my bearings stay a
    lot cleaner. As with all bearings, if you submerge them in water,
    they are going to need a more aggressive maintenance schedule.

    I know this sounds like a lot of work, but for most of us DuraAce
    pedals are pretty expensive and once you learn how to do this job it's
    pretty easy. It just takes time and a lot of patience. A
    steady hand and a good pair of tweezers help, too.
     
  5. spin156 wrote:
    > Francesco Devittori wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> what kind of maintenance do dura-ace spd-sl pedals require?
    >> I'm using a pair of them since about 18 months, I notice that the black
    >> plastic insert is worn, but what about bearings?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Francesco

    >
    > Here is an article on SPD pedal maintenance:
    >
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/fix/?id=shimano_pedals
    >
    > SPD and SPD-SL types are pretty much the same as each other as far as
    > the axle and bearing mechanism. This article shows you how to
    > disassemble them and just add new grease. Personally, I take them
    > apart completely and clean everything completely. This takes a lot
    > of patience as there are 24 3/32" loose balls in each pedal (two sets
    > of 12). It takes me about 45 minutes to completely disassemble,
    > clean, grease, and re-assemble one pedal. It's a good winter or
    > rainy day project. I do mine about once a year. The one
    > special tool you need is the Shimano TL-40. There are a couple of
    > other flat open end wrenches you need and you can use a small socket
    > for the lock nut on the end. You service these just like any other
    > loose ball bearing set. I also find that an axle vise makes life
    > much easier to hold the whole thing. Set up over a big rag or in
    > some kind of a box, as you are guaranteed to drop at least a couple of
    > those tiny little balls. The last thing you do is to make sure
    > the tiny rubber seal (it's not an o-ring, but similar) is seated down
    > in the plastic housing as far as you can get it.
    > This is what keeps the dirt out of the bearings and it tends to float
    > away from the plastic housing. Hold the pedal in your hand and
    > rotate it around the axle, and, at the same time, push that little seal
    > down into the plastic housing with a fingernail. Once I figured
    > out what this did and started keeping it pushed in, my bearings stay a
    > lot cleaner. As with all bearings, if you submerge them in water,
    > they are going to need a more aggressive maintenance schedule.
    >
    > I know this sounds like a lot of work, but for most of us DuraAce
    > pedals are pretty expensive and once you learn how to do this job it's
    > pretty easy. It just takes time and a lot of patience. A
    > steady hand and a good pair of tweezers help, too.
    >


    WOW! That's exactly what I was looking for!
    Thanks!

    Francesco
     
  6. spin156 wrote:
    > Francesco Devittori wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> what kind of maintenance do dura-ace spd-sl pedals require?
    >> I'm using a pair of them since about 18 months, I notice that the black
    >> plastic insert is worn, but what about bearings?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Francesco

    >
    > Here is an article on SPD pedal maintenance:
    >
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech/fix/?id=shimano_pedals
    >
    > SPD and SPD-SL types are pretty much the same as each other as far as
    > the axle and bearing mechanism. This article shows you how to
    > disassemble them and just add new grease. Personally, I take them
    > apart completely and clean everything completely. This takes a lot
    > of patience as there are 24 3/32" loose balls in each pedal (two sets
    > of 12). It takes me about 45 minutes to completely disassemble,
    > clean, grease, and re-assemble one pedal. It's a good winter or
    > rainy day project. I do mine about once a year. The one
    > special tool you need is the Shimano TL-40. There are a couple of
    > other flat open end wrenches you need and you can use a small socket
    > for the lock nut on the end. You service these just like any other
    > loose ball bearing set. I also find that an axle vise makes life
    > much easier to hold the whole thing. Set up over a big rag or in
    > some kind of a box, as you are guaranteed to drop at least a couple of
    > those tiny little balls. The last thing you do is to make sure
    > the tiny rubber seal (it's not an o-ring, but similar) is seated down
    > in the plastic housing as far as you can get it.
    > This is what keeps the dirt out of the bearings and it tends to float
    > away from the plastic housing. Hold the pedal in your hand and
    > rotate it around the axle, and, at the same time, push that little seal
    > down into the plastic housing with a fingernail. Once I figured
    > out what this did and started keeping it pushed in, my bearings stay a
    > lot cleaner. As with all bearings, if you submerge them in water,
    > they are going to need a more aggressive maintenance schedule.
    >
    > I know this sounds like a lot of work, but for most of us DuraAce
    > pedals are pretty expensive and once you learn how to do this job it's
    > pretty easy. It just takes time and a lot of patience. A
    > steady hand and a good pair of tweezers help, too.
    >


    WOW! That's exactly what I was looking for!
    Thanks!

    Francesco
     
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