Good grief....



J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 09:08:15 +0100, David Martin
<[email protected]> wrote in message
<BD8EAC7F.232B2%[email protected]>:

>I find I get a better view of what is behind me when using the mirrors. SO I
>use mirrors to reverse. Nothing wrong with using mirrors, as long as you
>ensure that you are taking proper observation.


I used to drive removal vans. I have reversed a 36ft long truck
between a line of brand-new unregistered Jaguars and a line of
brand-new unregistered Porsches in the car storage yard where we used
to park, with around 2ft clearance each side. I can reverse using
mirrors. Most car drivers can't! You can tell because they are
almost always going *much* faster than would be prudent - so what's
new? :)

No wonder there are five million motor insurance claims every year...

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Jon Senior
<jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOTco_DOT_uk> ('') wrote:

> Tony Raven [email protected] opined the following...
>> Paul - *** wrote:
>> >
>> > Heheheh .. my 'Kensington tractor' is a little different to those,
>> > I guess .... It does actually get used, and abused, off-road a
>> > _lot_ ... ;)
>> >
>> > http://groups.msn.com/LosiPaulsPictures/shoebox.msnw?Page=3
>> >
>> > The pics on pages 1 and 2 are a little 'tamer' .. ;)

>>
>> That's not deep, this is deep - http://www.muddy4x4.com/90wet.htm

>
> A wonderful story from a FOAF. He works on an estate a little way from
> Bridge of Allan. The estate's owner has a 4x4, but has one of the
> plush, leather seat, carpetted interior not to be used in wet
> conditions ones.
>
> On a trip back to the house he (As he and others often do) forded the
> stream rather than drive the 1 mile round trip to the proper crossing
> and back. The water was a little deeper and faster than it had been.
> Testament to the car in that it made it through and up the other side.
> But witnesses then watched as he climbed out, opened the back door and
> the water poured out of the interior. The car was left open around the
> back of the house so that the carpets could dry out.


In these parts the sea is very shallow and the tide goes out a long way.
Much of the sea bottom is firm sand or clay, some isn't. Every year
some grockle or other decides it's clever to take his 4x4 out on the
sand for a spin. Every year some grockle gets bogged down somewhere.
Twice a day the tide comes in. What price would you give for a five day
old Suzuki Grand Vitara (five days from first registered) which has
spent three of those days being washed through with salt water twice a
day? The sorry object sat in the back yard of Kirkcudbright garage for
a few weeks until the lost adjusters were finished with it, and was
then scrapped.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; Usenet: like distance learning without the learning.
 
J

Jon Senior

Guest
Simon Brooke [email protected] opined the following...
> In these parts the sea is very shallow and the tide goes out a long way.
> Much of the sea bottom is firm sand or clay, some isn't. Every year
> some grockle or other decides it's clever to take his 4x4 out on the
> sand for a spin. Every year some grockle gets bogged down somewhere.
> Twice a day the tide comes in. What price would you give for a five day
> old Suzuki Grand Vitara (five days from first registered) which has
> spent three of those days being washed through with salt water twice a
> day? The sorry object sat in the back yard of Kirkcudbright garage for
> a few weeks until the lost adjusters were finished with it, and was
> then scrapped.


That's brilliant. I don't suppose the Grockle was encouraged to remain
with his vehicle for the three days? Out of interest, why did it take
three days to recover? Was it difficult to get someone to do it, or were
they just laughing too much?

Jon
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 10/10/04 3:05 pm, in article
[email protected], "Simon Brooke"
<[email protected]> wrote:

> What price would you give for a five day
> old Suzuki Grand Vitara (five days from first registered) which has
> spent three of those days being washed through with salt water twice a
> day? The sorry object sat in the back yard of Kirkcudbright garage for
> a few weeks until the lost adjusters were finished with it, and was
> then scrapped.


He should have bought a toyota pickup if he wanted to subject it to tidal
waters..
(AKA the car they couldn't kill on top gear)

...d
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Jon Senior
<jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOTco_DOT_uk> ('') wrote:

> Simon Brooke [email protected] opined the following...
>> In these parts the sea is very shallow and the tide goes out a long
>> way. Much of the sea bottom is firm sand or clay, some isn't. Every
>> year some grockle or other decides it's clever to take his 4x4 out on
>> the sand for a spin. Every year some grockle gets bogged down
>> somewhere. Twice a day the tide comes in. What price would you give
>> for a five day old Suzuki Grand Vitara (five days from first
>> registered) which has spent three of those days being washed through
>> with salt water twice a day? The sorry object sat in the back yard of
>> Kirkcudbright garage for a few weeks until the lost adjusters were
>> finished with it, and was then scrapped.

>
> That's brilliant. I don't suppose the Grockle was encouraged to remain
> with his vehicle for the three days? Out of interest, why did it take
> three days to recover? Was it difficult to get someone to do it, or
> were they just laughing too much?


Got stuck on a Saturday morning on a rising tide (first day of his
holiday, I believe). First tide washed through it before a recovery
could be organised and after that it wasn't urgent.

One of these incidents (not the brand new Vitara) required the occupants
of the vehicle to be rescued off its roof by the inshore rescue boat.
This year's was a Disco, I believe, on Southwick sands; the Vitara was
about three years ago off the Doon beach in Kirkcudbright bay; and the
inshore rescue boat story was about two years ago in Fleet Bay.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
Copyright (c) Simon Brooke; All rights reserved. Permission is
granted to transfer this message via UUCP or NNTP and to store it
for the purpose of archiving or further transfer. Permission is
explicitly denied to use this message as part of a 'Web Forum', or
to transfer it by HTTP.
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 14:05:04 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
wrote in message <[email protected]>:

>What price would you give for a five day
>old Suzuki Grand Vitara (five days from first registered) which has
>spent three of those days being washed through with salt water twice a
>day?


About the same as I'd give for one which hadn't, I guess...

>The sorry object sat in the back yard of Kirkcudbright garage for
>a few weeks until the lost adjusters were finished with it, and was
>then scrapped.


See what I mean? Worth every penny I'd have been prepared to pay for
it :)

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
 
N

Naqerj

Guest
On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 14:18:12 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 09:08:15 +0100, David Martin
><[email protected]> wrote in message
><BD8EAC7F.232B2%[email protected]>:
>
>>I find I get a better view of what is behind me when using the mirrors. SO I
>>use mirrors to reverse. Nothing wrong with using mirrors, as long as you
>>ensure that you are taking proper observation.

>
>I used to drive removal vans. I have reversed a 36ft long truck
>between a line of brand-new unregistered Jaguars and a line of
>brand-new unregistered Porsches in the car storage yard where we used
>to park, with around 2ft clearance each side. I can reverse using
>mirrors. Most car drivers can't! You can tell because they are
>almost always going *much* faster than would be prudent - so what's
>new? :)


Yes, I often reverse on mirrors too. Like you it comes from having
driven vans (though not removal vans in my case). Reversing a trailer
using the mirrors is another handy skill.

Some car drivers are handicapped when it comes to reversing with
mirrors 'cos the mirrors are ubggre all use at showing what's behind
you - particularly (from personal experience) if the car's a Vauxhall
Astra.

>
>No wonder there are five million motor insurance claims every year...
>



--
Naqerj
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 10/10/04 8:48 pm, in article [email protected],
"Naqerj" <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 14:18:12 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 09:08:15 +0100, David Martin
>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> <BD8EAC7F.232B2%[email protected]>:
>>
>>> I find I get a better view of what is behind me when using the mirrors. SO I
>>> use mirrors to reverse. Nothing wrong with using mirrors, as long as you
>>> ensure that you are taking proper observation.

>>
>> I used to drive removal vans. I have reversed a 36ft long truck
>> between a line of brand-new unregistered Jaguars and a line of
>> brand-new unregistered Porsches in the car storage yard where we used
>> to park, with around 2ft clearance each side. I can reverse using
>> mirrors. Most car drivers can't! You can tell because they are
>> almost always going *much* faster than would be prudent - so what's
>> new? :)

>
> Yes, I often reverse on mirrors too. Like you it comes from having
> driven vans (though not removal vans in my case). Reversing a trailer
> using the mirrors is another handy skill.
>
> Some car drivers are handicapped when it comes to reversing with
> mirrors 'cos the mirrors are ubggre all use at showing what's behind
> you - particularly (from personal experience) if the car's a Vauxhall
> Astra.
>


I've got an Astra and still reverse on the mirrors. I have driven vans,
minibusses etc and can happily reverse most things.

My parents keep the car off road in the back garden. To get it out you have
to reverse out of the garden into the alley running alongside, then down the
alley to the road. (It is easier to drive in and reverse out than the other
way round). You have about 6-8" either side of the wing mirrors. We had to
be able to get the car out and in before being allowed to borrow it.

You cannot fit a transit van up the alley without physically removing the
wing mirrors. (tried it)

...d
 
A

AndyMorris

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
>> observation.

>
> I used to drive removal vans. I have reversed a 36ft long truck
> between a line of brand-new unregistered Jaguars and a line of
> brand-new unregistered Porsches in the car storage yard where we used
> to park, with around 2ft clearance each side.


And you didn't manage to get onw of them?



--
Andy Morris

AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK


Love this:
Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
 
G

Gonzalez

Guest
On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 22:34:57 +0100, David Martin
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I've got an Astra and still reverse on the mirrors. I have driven vans,
>minibusses etc and can happily reverse most things.


Can you ride your bike backwards?
 
D

dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers

Guest
>>> They escaped from Woburn Abbey. They're crowding out native deer and
>>> they eat everything the rabbits can't reach. Send 'em all home.

>>
>>Not "Shoot them and burn the bodies"?

>
>Barbecue, anyone?


Well my one-eyed, small (six pounds in weight) cat (*the* Wafflycat) has been
known to try to fell a muntjac. I've seen her go for one. She missed it's neck,
and it ran off, whereupon she chased it several hundred yards across a field at
the back of my house. She does the same if it's a roe deer. She has jumped out
of a first floor window in an attempt to get a pheasant. She can successfully
hunt rabbits and jump a six-foot fence with a rabbit in her jaws. I blame David
Attenborough. So many documentaries on the big cats of Africa, the BBC has
given my small housecat delusions of grandeur. No piffling little birds for
her, she wants the big stuff.

To keep this on topic, I do have a small decal of her on my bike :)

Cheers, helen s


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W

Whingin' Pom

Guest
On 11 Oct 2004 07:49:25 GMT, [email protected]omcom
(dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers) () wrote:

>Well my one-eyed, small (six pounds in weight) cat (*the* Wafflycat) has been
>known to try to fell a muntjac. I've seen her go for one. She missed it's neck,
>and it ran off, whereupon she chased it several hundred yards across a field at
>the back of my house. She does the same if it's a roe deer. She has jumped out
>of a first floor window in an attempt to get a pheasant. She can successfully
>hunt rabbits and jump a six-foot fence with a rabbit in her jaws. I blame David
>Attenborough. So many documentaries on the big cats of Africa, the BBC has
>given my small housecat delusions of grandeur. No piffling little birds for
>her, she wants the big stuff.


Awwwww...

No mean feat, catching bunnies, either.
Some friends of ours were staff to a cat that brought home a chicken
once. Not bad, considering they lived on an inner-city estate. To this
day they still have no idea where it came from. Our feline ex-employer
was also lacking when it came to judging the suitable size of relative
prey. She was an uncanny ratter, despite being of a similar size to
the Wafflycat. Unfortunately, taxis don't back down. :-(

>To keep this on topic, I do have a small decal of her on my bike :)


Oh, yeah, bikes. Of course. Right. Cycling, isn't it...

Custom-made decal or purchased from LBS? I quite fancy a custom decal
or two for the recumbent.

--
Matt K.
"Life is like pudding; soft and squishy..."
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 11/10/04 7:02 am, in article [email protected],
"Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 22:34:57 +0100, David Martin
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> I've got an Astra and still reverse on the mirrors. I have driven vans,
>> minibusses etc and can happily reverse most things.

>
> Can you ride your bike backwards?


I've ridden a tricycle backwards (OK, I was sat facing backwards on the
handlebars..)

...d
 
D

dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers

Guest
>Custom-made decal or purchased from LBS? I quite fancy a custom decal
>or two for the recumbent.


Custom-made by the highly skilled Mr Whelan of this 'ere newsgroup. I highly
recommend his decals.

Cheers, helen s


--This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
to get correct one remove fame & fortune
h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

--Due to financial crisis the light at the end of the tunnel is switched off--
 
A

Alan Braggins

Guest
dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
>>>> They escaped from Woburn Abbey. They're crowding out native deer and
>>>> they eat everything the rabbits can't reach. Send 'em all home.
>>>
>>>Not "Shoot them and burn the bodies"?

>>
>>Barbecue, anyone?

>
>Well my one-eyed, small (six pounds in weight) cat (*the* Wafflycat) has been
>known to try to fell a muntjac. I've seen her go for one. She missed it's neck,
>and it ran off, whereupon she chased it several hundred yards across a field at
>the back of my house. She does the same if it's a roe deer. She has jumped out
>of a first floor window in an attempt to get a pheasant. She can successfully
>hunt rabbits and jump a six-foot fence with a rabbit in her jaws.


A friend of mine had cats who caught a rabbit and wanted to give it to the
owner as a present. Being unable to jump the full distance from the coalshed
roof in through the bedroom window carrying a rabbit, they solved the problem
by chewing the rabbit in half first and then leaving two half rabbits
bleeding on the pillows. That window stayed shut after that.
 
D

dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers

Guest
>A friend of mine had cats who caught a rabbit and wanted to give it to the
>owner as a present. Being unable to jump the full distance from the coalshed
>roof in through the bedroom window carrying a rabbit, they solved the problem
>by chewing the rabbit in half first and then leaving two half rabbits
>bleeding on the pillows. That window stayed shut after that.


I've had heads of rabbits left, a la Mario Puzo stylee, in various places of
easy stepping-on locations. One year, served to me as a birthday present was a
fully-grown male rat, left in just the right spot my by foot, as I read my
emails that day...

Cheers, helen s


--This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
to get correct one remove fame & fortune
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J

Jon Senior

Guest
In article <2004101[email protected]>,
[email protected]omcom says...
> Well my one-eyed, small (six pounds in weight) cat (*the* Wafflycat) has been
> known to try to fell a muntjac. I've seen her go for one. She missed it's neck,
> and it ran off, whereupon she chased it several hundred yards across a field at
> the back of my house. She does the same if it's a roe deer. She has jumped out
> of a first floor window in an attempt to get a pheasant. She can successfully
> hunt rabbits and jump a six-foot fence with a rabbit in her jaws. I blame David
> Attenborough. So many documentaries on the big cats of Africa, the BBC has
> given my small housecat delusions of grandeur. No piffling little birds for
> her, she wants the big stuff.


One of my parent's cats has just, at the ripe old age of 19, brought in
a fit and healthy mouse by way of demonstration that she _can_ still
hunt, she just chooses not to!

The other one poses little or no threat to local wildlife. His first
"gift" to us was a flat pigeon with tyre tracks over it.

Jon
 
M

MartinM

Guest
Jon Senior <[email protected]_DOT_co_DOT_uk.remove> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> In article <[email protected]>,
> [email protected]omcom says...
> > Well my one-eyed, small (six pounds in weight) cat (*the* Wafflycat) has been
> > known to try to fell a muntjac. I've seen her go for one. She missed it's neck,
> > and it ran off, whereupon she chased it several hundred yards across a field at
> > the back of my house. She does the same if it's a roe deer. She has jumped out
> > of a first floor window in an attempt to get a pheasant. She can successfully
> > hunt rabbits and jump a six-foot fence with a rabbit in her jaws. I blame David
> > Attenborough. So many documentaries on the big cats of Africa, the BBC has
> > given my small housecat delusions of grandeur. No piffling little birds for
> > her, she wants the big stuff.


I came into the kitchen many years ago to find a thick layer of yellow
feathers (but no canary) all over the floor and a very pleased looking
cat. I had to take all the feathers in a sack to an undisclosed
location in case the bag split while the refuse operatives were
lobbing the bag into the lorry in view of my (canary breeding)
neighbour ;-)
 
W

Whingin' Pom

Guest
On 11 Oct 2004 08:27:07 GMT, [email protected]omcom
(dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers) () wrote:

>>Custom-made decal or purchased from LBS? I quite fancy a custom decal
>>or two for the recumbent.

>
>Custom-made by the highly skilled Mr Whelan of this 'ere newsgroup. I highly
>recommend his decals.


I shall have to drop him a line, then. Decals aren't heavy, so postage
will be cheap. :)

--
Matt K.
"Rev. D. Wayne Love's 12 Step Plan.
Step Two: You figure that's just gotta be jelly 'cos jam just don't
shake like that."