Good grief....



S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Alan Braggins
('[email protected]') wrote:

> dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
>>
>>Well my one-eyed, small (six pounds in weight) cat (*the* Wafflycat)
>>has been known to try to fell a muntjac. I've seen her go for one. She
>>missed it's neck, and it ran off, whereupon she chased it several
>>hundred yards across a field at the back of my house. She does the
>>same if it's a roe deer. She has jumped out of a first floor window in
>>an attempt to get a pheasant. She can successfully hunt rabbits and
>>jump a six-foot fence with a rabbit in her jaws.

>
> A friend of mine had cats who caught a rabbit and wanted to give it to
> the owner as a present. Being unable to jump the full distance from
> the coalshed roof in through the bedroom window carrying a rabbit,
> they solved the problem by chewing the rabbit in half first and then
> leaving two half rabbits
> bleeding on the pillows. That window stayed shut after that.


My cat used, in her youth, to bring in a rabbit every morning. She was
in the habit of eating just the head, leaving the beheaded corpse and
the ears as presents for me. She very often used to consume the head
under my bed, and this process made a most unpleasant crunching noise.
She's also brought in on various occasions a hare bigger than herself,
pheasants, a woodcock, a live and undamaged bat, and assorted birds
including pigeons and rooks...

Fortunately in her old age she's getting lazier.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
Just as defying the law of gravity through building aircraft requires
careful design and a lot of effort, so too does defying laws of
economics. It seems to be a deeply ingrained aspect of humanity to
forever strive to improve things, so unquestioning acceptance of a
free market system seems to me to be unnatural. ;; Charles Bryant
 
C

Call me Bob

Guest
On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 08:35:05 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
wrote:

>My cat used, in her youth, to bring in a rabbit every morning. She was
>in the habit of eating just the head, leaving the beheaded corpse and
>the ears as presents for me. She very often used to consume the head
>under my bed, and this process made a most unpleasant crunching noise.
>She's also brought in on various occasions a hare bigger than herself,
>pheasants, a woodcock, a live and undamaged bat, and assorted birds
>including pigeons and rooks...


I've never really liked cats but I had no idea they could be trained
to bring in fresh rabbit, hare, woodcock and pheasant. Now, where's
that casserole dish...
--

"Bob"

'The people have spoken, the bastards'

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