Heart Rate Monitor that can handle electrical interference

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Ian Levit, May 21, 2003.

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  1. Ian Levit

    Ian Levit Guest

    I currently have a Polar Protrainer XP. It works well, except you are near high voltage lines, where
    the electrical/electromagnetic interference is strong, in which case the HRM stops working. That is,
    it stops showing your heart rate, and therfore all of its recording functions are useless. Polar
    does explain that the HRM will NOT work properly when in areas with a great deal of
    electrical/electromagnetic interference, and they are right.

    The bike Trail in Northern Virginia (from Ashburn East) is also the right-of-way for the electrical
    power company, and the trail is just a few feet from, and runs parallel to high voltage lines. As
    soon as you get to the area with the high voltage lines, the HRM stops working.

    I'm sure others may have had this problem. I would like to know which product (Make and Model)
    people believe can best handle electrical/electromagnetic interference.

    Thanks.

    Ian [email protected]
     
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  2. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > I currently have a Polar Protrainer XP. It works well, except you are near high voltage lines,
    > where the electrical/electromagnetic interference is strong, in which case the HRM stops working.
    > That is, it stops showing your heart rate, and therfore all of its recording functions are
    > useless. Polar does explain that the HRM will NOT work properly when in areas with a great deal of
    > electrical/electromagnetic interference, and they are right.

    What they don't explain is that the HRM once confused by EMF, never recovers unless
    restarted manually.

    > The bike Trail in Northern Virginia (from Ashburn East) is also the right-of-way for the
    > electrical power company, and the trail is just a few feet from, and runs parallel to high voltage
    > lines. As soon as you get to the area with the high voltage lines, the HRM stops working.
    >
    > I'm sure others may have had this problem. I would like to know which product (Make and Model)
    > people believe can best handle electrical/electromagnetic interference.

    I tried and gave up on a Polar HRM because my daily commute crossed a RR track and a High Voltage
    line and was essentially useless.

    I replaced mime with Sports Instrument ECG5. I still have the same porblem crossing under the
    powerlines, but it recovers soon after I exit the area.

    If your bike route parallels the High Voltage line you may be SOL. since none offer 100% shielding.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  3. Brian Hughes

    Brian Hughes Guest

    When I try to use a Polar heart monitor while jogging on the treadmill and watching TV, it doesn't
    work either--unless I push the TV to the other side of the room and restart it. One of the downfalls
    of wireless. But this is rarely a problem anymore, I have all but given up on the treadmill. Riding
    suits my joints much better than running does.

    Brian
     
  4. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    Ian:

    I have a Polar Xtrainer Plus and it has never worked on the section of the W&OD trail that you refer
    to in Northern Virginia. I don't think anything that uses radio signals will. Might as well just
    shut it off for those sections.

    On Wed, 21 May 2003 15:13:03 -0400, "Ian Levit" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I currently have a Polar Protrainer XP. It works well, except you are near high voltage lines,
    >where the electrical/electromagnetic interference is strong, in which case the HRM stops working.
    >That is, it stops showing your heart rate, and therfore all of its recording functions are useless.
    >Polar does explain that the HRM will NOT work properly when in areas with a great deal of
    >electrical/electromagnetic interference, and they are right.
    >
    >The bike Trail in Northern Virginia (from Ashburn East) is also the right-of-way for the electrical
    >power company, and the trail is just a few feet from, and runs parallel to high voltage lines. As
    >soon as you get to the area with the high voltage lines, the HRM stops working.
    >
    >I'm sure others may have had this problem. I would like to know which product (Make and Model)
    >people believe can best handle electrical/electromagnetic interference.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >Ian [email protected]
     
  5. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    On Thu, 22 May 2003 01:56:15 GMT, "brian hughes" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When I try to use a Polar heart monitor while jogging on the treadmill and watching TV, it doesn't
    >work either--unless I push the TV to the other side of the room and restart it.

    Brian:

    I use it all the time on the Concept II rowing machine, and it works fine in conjunction with the
    TV. I even use it in conjunction with 900 mhz headphones, so I can hear the TV over the roar of the
    CII. Have never had a problem, at least not one that was related to RF. Both the wrist receiver and
    the receiver on the CII work.

    Scott
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Dear Ian,

    As to the Polar, mine has less interference when the battery is fresh and strong.

    This month's Consumer Reports (which I cannot find at the moment) tests heart rate monitors. Perhaps
    one of them is not wireless.

    Andy

    "Ian Levit" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I currently have a Polar Protrainer XP. It works well, except you are
    near
    > high voltage lines, where the electrical/electromagnetic interference is strong, in which case the
    > HRM stops working. That is, it stops showing
    your
    > heart rate, and therfore all of its recording functions are useless.
    Polar
    > does explain that the HRM will NOT work properly when in areas with a
    great
    > deal of electrical/electromagnetic interference, and they are right.
    >
    > The bike Trail in Northern Virginia (from Ashburn East) is also the right-of-way for the
    > electrical power company, and the trail is just a few feet from, and runs parallel to high voltage
    > lines. As soon as you get to the area with the high voltage lines, the HRM stops working.
    >
    > I'm sure others may have had this problem. I would like to know which product (Make and Model)
    > people believe can best handle electrical/electromagnetic interference.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Ian [email protected]
    >
     
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