I only eat - uh - normal stuff

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Modom, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 10 Mar 2004 06:26:39 -0800,
    > [email protected] (Cindy hamilton) wrote:
    >
    > >Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:<[email protected]>...
    > >> On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 19:44:23 -0600, modom
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> Odd that she should have been looking between H and K
    > >> for something you told her begins with J. Oh, J *is*
    > >> between H and K. And so sad she hadn't studied Spanish.
    > >
    > >Why? (Why Spanish in particular, I mean.)
    >
    > Jicama is a Spanish word (the plant apparently originated
    > in middle or south America). It is pronounced (just in
    > case you din't already know) HEE-cah-mah, as a 'J' is
    > pronounced like 'H' in Spanish. Modom specified that it
    > started with 'J' to reduce confusion.

    Ah! How obtuse of me.

    I eventually learned to pronounce jicama, even though I
    don't speak Spanish. (I was hampered at first by not knowing
    it's a Spanish word.)

    Cindy Hamilton
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Some years later, I worked for a little over a year as a
    > grease monkey in a university motor pool. Boy can I change
    > a tire. And oil changes? I can do them under water. The
    > supervisor there finally

    > was also very fat and had high blood pressure. I bought
    > him donuts (OBFood) every day in a failed, sick plot to
    > kill him.

    <Spewing TaB all over the monitor!> (OBFood) LOL! Michael!

    > modom
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-8-04.
    Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
    the button to prove it!) "The only difference between a rut
    and a grave is the depth of the hole."
     
  3. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 09:54:23 -0500, Nancy Young
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Frogleg wrote:

    >> And I thought long and hard about it, too. It's the first
    >> time I've ever made an ad hominem attack in a newsgroup.
    >
    >Michael Odom strikes me as one of the nicest people here.

    I have thought so, too. However, there have been a number of
    similar posts here and in other groups (not by him), and I
    was up to here with
    it. In fact, I pay no attention whatsoever when a troll says
    something similar -- it's not worth replying to.
    >
    >> However, I *do* get stirred up by those who post "look
    >> how clever I am and how stupid and silly the person who
    >> waits on me is. Isn't this amusing?" It's *not* amusing.
    >> It's mean-spirited and ugly.
    >
    >I think you're going overboard, reading the situation far
    >too harshly. He didn't berate the woman or anything,

    "...tried in vain to look up my veggies..." "Her tragic
    look..." "...bar code to the rescue!..." "I pipe
    cheerfully.... She searched and searched." "...her eyes grow
    sheets of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same lack
    of attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full belly."
    "The dear child at the register..."

    He may not have told her she was an idiot to her face, but
    he held her up to ridicule to 'amuse' *us*.

    >he just told a story about his shopping experience. I
    >thought it was interesting and I was surprised that she
    >actually said she was waiting for someone to bring her
    >kiwis to check out.

    >Okay, I was taken aback, I thought, does this store not
    >sell kiwis? If she was at all curious, why not take a spin
    >around the produce aisle. I would! People here have
    >mentioned many, MANY things that I have made a point to
    >seek out next time I was in the grocery store so I'd know
    >what they were talking about.

    Not to continue my role as attack frog, but how many times
    have you actually done that? Or been too hurried to bother
    just then? I waited tables in a coffee shop/restaurant for a
    brief time, and believe me, after 6-10 hrs on my feet (even
    with very young feet) I had very little interest in learning
    anything about food service.
    >
    >Actually, it should, in my opinion, be mandatory for the
    >checkout people to have a pretty good knowledge of the
    >produce available in the store. It's part of their job to
    >know what it is. They have to check it out.

    It would be very nice if that were possible. However, in a
    non-union shop, these are nearly all part-time (no
    benefits), close to minimum-wage workers. For the most part,
    they come and go with the tide. The store has no reason to
    spend time training them beyond the basics.

    >Now, Mike probably did not need to know what happened
    >elsewhere in the factory, it didn't impact his job. Apples
    >and oranges.

    But he *said* it was her lack of alertness and curiousity
    that peeved him so badly, not that she was poorly trained.
    He says he's held McJobs, but doesn't mention *his*
    curiousity and interest in finding out all he could. That
    is, it's ok to have a crappy job during the summer and pay
    no attention because you're going to be back in school in
    the fall (I'm making assumptions here), but if you work at a
    McJob to survive, you *must* be bright and ambitious and
    curious. Apples and oranges, indeed.

    I'm sorry I picked Modom to vent at, but I can't
    retract my views.
     
  4. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 11:40:12 -0600, modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I wrote:
    >>>>>Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >>>>
    >
    >Forgleg wrote:
    >>>>For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of
    >>>>people in this country who've never eaten cilantro or
    >>>>kiwi or jicama, and have no idea what they are nor what
    >>>>they look like. Ignorance isn't stupidity.
    >>>
    >I wrote:
    >>>Mean toad? A Frogleg called a modom a toad!
    >>
    >Frogleg wrote:
    >>And I thought long and hard about it, too. It's the first
    >>time I've ever made an ad hominem attack in a newsgroup.
    >>However, I *do* get stirred up by those who post "look how
    >>clever I am and how stupid and silly the person who waits
    >>on me is. Isn't this amusing?" It's *not* amusing. It's
    >>mean-spirited and ugly.
    >
    >I suppose it was the overall tenor of my story that got
    >under your skin. And while I can see why you may feel
    >called upon to defend the common woman from what appears to
    >you to have been an assault from an upper-class twit, your
    >attack just doesn't seem warrented.
    >>>
    >I wrote:
    >>>Actually, I believe we've failed to communicate on this
    >>>matter. If you are interested, you might look at some of
    >>>my other responses in this thread to get a better
    >>>understanding of my attitude which has little to do with
    >>>meanness. It's not the lack of knowledge, but the lack of
    >>>inquisitiveness.

    <snip in the interest of not eventually producing a novel>

    Pls. see my new follow-up to Nancy Young in the original
    thread. My fingers are getting tired.

    I didn't say you were an upper-class twit, even in my mind.
    I said you were mean-spirited in this instance. And I wasn't
    defending the "common woman," whatever that is. I don't care
    whether you're upper class or working in a box factory, nor
    whether the clerk was male or female. The tone of lordly
    superiority at the clerk's failure to rise to your
    expectations was what bothered me. Your resume is
    impressive, but it doesn't grant the right to hold people up
    to ridicule in front of others in a public forum. If you
    want to giggle over this with your SO, by all means do so.

    You say you worked and studied to better yourself in many of
    the jobs you've had. Good for you. These sound like
    projects, however difficult, you were interested in. Not
    everyone is so motivated, or in a situation where motivation
    and interest butters any parsnips.

    As I just wrote in the other thread, I've seen too much
    recently in this same vein. The essence of which is,
    everyone who doesn't share my goals, interests, and
    sterling personal qualities is a dope. Or fit only to be a
    butt of jokes. People who don't cook wholesome healthy
    meals at home are lazy. Waitresses who make mistakes with
    change are subnormal. Doctors should never misdiagnose,
    else they're idiots.

    Again, I didn't say you hadn't suffered, or worked at low
    paying jobs, or bettered your situation. Just that your post
    seemed mean and rather arogant. Particularly the line "Why
    do people who don't like food work in food stores?" It
    sounds as if you've moved beyond $700/mo, what with blood
    oranges and breaking up a perfectly good planter to smoke
    your ribs. I don't think many supermarket clerks have
    arrived at that station in life. Give 'em a break.
     
  5. Maxine In Ri

    Maxine In Ri Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:

    > Actually, it should, in my opinion, be mandatory for the
    > checkout people to have a pretty good knowledge of the
    > produce available in the store. It's part of their job to
    > know what it is. They have to check it out. Now, Mike
    > probably did not need to know what happened elsewhere in
    > the factory, it didn't impact his job. Apples and oranges.
    >
    > nancy

    In most of the markets I've been in, I've found at one time
    or another trainees being led through the produce
    department, item by item.

    And with the blow-on stickers on almost every piece of
    produce, they should be able to find the code for what it
    is.

    maxine in ri
     
  6. "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > It would be very nice if that were possible.

    Of course it's possible. There is absolutely no reason why
    it would be *impossible* unless the cashier were forbidden
    from entering any other part of the store (or any other
    supermarket, for that matter) whether working or not.

    >However, in a non-union shop, these are nearly all part-
    >time (no benefits), close to minimum-wage workers. For the
    >most part, they come and go with the tide. The store has no
    >reason to spend time training them beyond the basics.
    >

    How much one gets paid or how many benefits one gets should
    have little to do with the quality of work produced.
    Whatever job one does should be done to the best of one's
    ability. I worked in retail for 3 years and hated it as much
    as I could hate anything (that job was, btw, what drove me
    to swear--I very rarely did before that). However, I was
    still the top salesperson in my store and other stores in
    the area would call me to work for them as much as my
    manager would allow. It was a non-union store with no
    benefits and I was paid minimum wage. Does that mean I
    should have slacked off? It's amazing to me how many excuses
    people can make for doing a shitty job and being lazy. "I'm
    getting paid minimum wage so it's OK if I do a crap job."
    Have some pride in your work and yourself (that's a general
    "your"), for god sake.

    rona

    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  7. stan

    stan Guest

    modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?

    No one detests all foods unless they have an eating
    disorder. No one works in a grocery store unless they have
    no other way to earn money. I worked in a small grocery
    store once; it was a major pain in the neck.
     
  8. stan

    stan Guest

    modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?

    No one detests all foods unless they have an eating
    disorder. No one works in a grocery store unless they have
    no other way to earn money. I worked in a small grocery
    store once; it was a major pain in the neck.
     
  9. Lynne

    Lynne Guest

    To this day I can not understand how any American high
    school graduate can not know what a lime looks like.
    Confuse pepper varieties? True, not even people who
    probably should know, can. Cilantro vs. parsley? Happens
    every day. Not saying it doesn't bother me.. Because after
    14 years I'm still teaching my poor dh how to
    differentiate the latter, who has bought and used (and
    grown!) them for as long as I have. Tsk! It is said there
    are many types of intelligences; and (arguably) one of
    them is the kind that one can differentiate details
    between items such as, say, similar-looking plants (can
    you tell the difference between a leaf-branch of ash-
    leaved maple, and poison ivy without them being side-by-
    side, for instance?). Presumably something to do with
    survival. But.. limes? I very don't get it. What much else
    does it resemble, in the average American grocery store?
    Overall I think I'd give the poor girl credit, since she
    kept an open mind about things she knew "might be out
    there" (beyond her limited scope of recognition), and
    didn't make any assumptions. Although still I think she'll
    end up wiping her ass with a poison ivy leaf.... In a
    grocery store a few miles outside Florida I bought a
    couple of limes. Just those typical, all-green, citrus
    fruit we all(?) know as "a lime". Might've been Persian,
    might've been Mexican, but not to be confused with its
    cousin "the lemon" which, except for its color it could
    resemble. The cashier looks at the fruit, asks: "Is this a
    lemonlime?" Right; one word. "Lemonlime." Here this and
    the, "Does this annoy anyone" thread may cross. If the
    person's parents never used any real lemon or lime juice
    for anything they ever made (well even the containers have
    pics, don't they - or are even shaped like the actual
    fruit!); then maybe they always only bought "lemon-lime"
    jello, or "lemon-lime" koolaid, lemon-lime soda.... Sad.
    Or, that girl spent her childhood watching tv instead of
    observing the world around her. (Remember the old 7-Up
    commercial: Made with "lymons"?). SuperSonic Sad. Maybe
    someone will tell me I'm being vicious and arrogant? Well
    then, sobeit. The next cashier who has a clue, I'm going
    to tip them.

    vent/



    "modom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > That's what the checker at the "super"market told me
    > yesterday as she tried in vain to look up my veggies in
    > her sku list. I'd presented her with:
    >
    > 3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting for
    > somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..." Kiwis
    > are furry. "Oh.")
    >
    > 1 poblano chile. (Her tragic look caused me to volunteer
    > its name before the question was formed, but she still
    > couldn't find it on her list. The sacker rescued her.)
    >
    > 1 avocado (got it!)
    >
    > 1 six pack of beer (got it again!)
    >
    > 1 sirloin steak (bar code to the rescue!)
    >
    > 1 bunch cilantro ("Parsley?" Nope.)
    >
    > 1 jicama (ruh-roh... It's a jicama, with a J, I pipe
    > cheerfully and proactively. She searched and searched.
    > "It's not on the list. It should be here between the H's
    > and the K's, but it's not." I guess there weren't any I's.
    > The friendly sacker strikes out, too, so off he trots to
    > the produce section to discover the price. 99 cents, says
    > I, too late.)
    >
    > I try to tell her about jicamas, but her eyes grow sheets
    > of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same lack of
    > attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full belly.
    > Well, I offer brightly, I really put you through a produce
    > test, but this stuff is good. Poblanos are used for chile
    > rellenos. Did you ever have a chile relleno? Her reply is
    > the headline. She lives in Texas.
    >
    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >
    > Here's a salad idea:
    >
    > Thinly slice about 1/4 medium jicama (peeled). Add a
    > sliced blood orange (don't try to find one in Cow Hill,
    > however), a sliced navel orange, and a sliced avocado.
    > Squeeze half a lime over the above stuff, and add a
    > generous splash EVOO. Add a scant tsp ground New Mexico
    > red chiles. Salt and pepper. Toss. Serve slightly chilled.
    >
    > modom
     
  10. Lynne

    Lynne Guest

    To this day I can not understand how any American high
    school graduate can not know what a lime looks like.
    Confuse pepper varieties? True, not even people who
    probably should know, can. Cilantro vs. parsley? Happens
    every day. Not saying it doesn't bother me.. Because after
    14 years I'm still teaching my poor dh how to
    differentiate the latter, who has bought and used (and
    grown!) them for as long as I have. Tsk! It is said there
    are many types of intelligences; and (arguably) one of
    them is the kind that one can differentiate details
    between items such as, say, similar-looking plants (can
    you tell the difference between a leaf-branch of ash-
    leaved maple, and poison ivy without them being side-by-
    side, for instance?). Presumably something to do with
    survival. But.. limes? I very don't get it. What much else
    does it resemble, in the average American grocery store?
    Overall I think I'd give the poor girl credit, since she
    kept an open mind about things she knew "might be out
    there" (beyond her limited scope of recognition), and
    didn't make any assumptions. Although still I think she'll
    end up wiping her ass with a poison ivy leaf.... In a
    grocery store a few miles outside Florida I bought a
    couple of limes. Just those typical, all-green, citrus
    fruit we all(?) know as "a lime". Might've been Persian,
    might've been Mexican, but not to be confused with its
    cousin "the lemon" which, except for its color it could
    resemble. The cashier looks at the fruit, asks: "Is this a
    lemonlime?" Right; one word. "Lemonlime." Here this and
    the, "Does this annoy anyone" thread may cross. If the
    person's parents never used any real lemon or lime juice
    for anything they ever made (well even the containers have
    pics, don't they - or are even shaped like the actual
    fruit!); then maybe they always only bought "lemon-lime"
    jello, or "lemon-lime" koolaid, lemon-lime soda.... Sad.
    Or, that girl spent her childhood watching tv instead of
    observing the world around her. (Remember the old 7-Up
    commercial: Made with "lymons"?). SuperSonic Sad. Maybe
    someone will tell me I'm being vicious and arrogant? Well
    then, sobeit. The next cashier who has a clue, I'm going
    to tip them.

    vent/



    "modom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > That's what the checker at the "super"market told me
    > yesterday as she tried in vain to look up my veggies in
    > her sku list. I'd presented her with:
    >
    > 3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting for
    > somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..." Kiwis
    > are furry. "Oh.")
    >
    > 1 poblano chile. (Her tragic look caused me to volunteer
    > its name before the question was formed, but she still
    > couldn't find it on her list. The sacker rescued her.)
    >
    > 1 avocado (got it!)
    >
    > 1 six pack of beer (got it again!)
    >
    > 1 sirloin steak (bar code to the rescue!)
    >
    > 1 bunch cilantro ("Parsley?" Nope.)
    >
    > 1 jicama (ruh-roh... It's a jicama, with a J, I pipe
    > cheerfully and proactively. She searched and searched.
    > "It's not on the list. It should be here between the H's
    > and the K's, but it's not." I guess there weren't any I's.
    > The friendly sacker strikes out, too, so off he trots to
    > the produce section to discover the price. 99 cents, says
    > I, too late.)
    >
    > I try to tell her about jicamas, but her eyes grow sheets
    > of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same lack of
    > attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full belly.
    > Well, I offer brightly, I really put you through a produce
    > test, but this stuff is good. Poblanos are used for chile
    > rellenos. Did you ever have a chile relleno? Her reply is
    > the headline. She lives in Texas.
    >
    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >
    > Here's a salad idea:
    >
    > Thinly slice about 1/4 medium jicama (peeled). Add a
    > sliced blood orange (don't try to find one in Cow Hill,
    > however), a sliced navel orange, and a sliced avocado.
    > Squeeze half a lime over the above stuff, and add a
    > generous splash EVOO. Add a scant tsp ground New Mexico
    > red chiles. Salt and pepper. Toss. Serve slightly chilled.
    >
    > modom
     
  11. Jbsummer

    Jbsummer Guest

    >> Re: I only eat - uh - normal stuff.

    You ought to see their reaction when I buy potted meat,
    deviled ham, and Vienna sausages.
     
  12. Jbsummer

    Jbsummer Guest

    >> Re: I only eat - uh - normal stuff.

    You ought to see their reaction when I buy potted meat,
    deviled ham, and Vienna sausages.
     
  13. [email protected] wrote:

    > No one works in a grocery store unless they have no other
    > way to earn money.

    I'm not sure that's true. My understanding of supermarket
    work is that it is relatively high paying and often union
    work-- compared to other jobs which require similar hours
    and skills.

    We often use this group as a place to come to complain so
    I'll say this: I drive out of my way to get to the
    supermarket I like. I like it. Good prices, clean, no Big
    Brother cards, helpful staff, fresh produce, etc. My only
    complaint is a small one, and that's the variety. Sometimes
    the store I don't like has the odd produce or fish item that
    I want so I go there just for that.

    --Lia
     
  14. [email protected] wrote:

    > No one works in a grocery store unless they have no other
    > way to earn money.

    I'm not sure that's true. My understanding of supermarket
    work is that it is relatively high paying and often union
    work-- compared to other jobs which require similar hours
    and skills.

    We often use this group as a place to come to complain so
    I'll say this: I drive out of my way to get to the
    supermarket I like. I like it. Good prices, clean, no Big
    Brother cards, helpful staff, fresh produce, etc. My only
    complaint is a small one, and that's the variety. Sometimes
    the store I don't like has the odd produce or fish item that
    I want so I go there just for that.

    --Lia
     
  15. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    [email protected] deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > modom <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >
    > No one detests all foods unless they have an eating
    > disorder. No one works in a grocery store unless they have
    > no other way to earn money. I worked in a small grocery
    > store once; it was a major pain in the neck.
    >

    I enjoyed working at the A&P part time when in high school.
    My parents were furious when I took the job. They thought my
    grades would suffer. Anyway I had a blast there. I made a
    lot of new friends and I could tell storys for years. One of
    the best was this lady emphatically telling me her bananas
    could not be bruised or damaged. Okay, I set the bananas on
    my little perch (we got to sit down back then, it was before
    the scanners hit). I rang her up and immediately sat down on
    the perch. My response was "shit, I sat on your bananas." I
    couldn't believe it. The woman laughed her butt off. I
    couldn't believe she was so cool about it.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
  16. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    [email protected] deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > modom <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >
    > No one detests all foods unless they have an eating
    > disorder. No one works in a grocery store unless they have
    > no other way to earn money. I worked in a small grocery
    > store once; it was a major pain in the neck.
    >

    I enjoyed working at the A&P part time when in high school.
    My parents were furious when I took the job. They thought my
    grades would suffer. Anyway I had a blast there. I made a
    lot of new friends and I could tell storys for years. One of
    the best was this lady emphatically telling me her bananas
    could not be bruised or damaged. Okay, I set the bananas on
    my little perch (we got to sit down back then, it was before
    the scanners hit). I rang her up and immediately sat down on
    the perch. My response was "shit, I sat on your bananas." I
    couldn't believe it. The woman laughed her butt off. I
    couldn't believe she was so cool about it.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
  17. "Lynne" <(name+)[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > To this day I can not understand how any American high
    > school graduate can not know what a lime looks like.
    > Confuse pepper varieties? True, not even people who
    > probably should know, can. Cilantro vs. parsley?
    > Happens every day. Not saying it doesn't bother me..
    > Because after 14 years I'm still teaching my poor dh
    > how to differentiate the latter, who has bought and
    > used (and grown!) them for as long as I have. Tsk!

    Have I ever mentioned the 27-year old university graduate I
    worked with who did not know what a citrus fruit was? This
    person was employed by the federal government yet couldn't
    even name a citrus fruit to save her life.

    rona
    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  18. "Lynne" <(name+)[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > To this day I can not understand how any American high
    > school graduate can not know what a lime looks like.
    > Confuse pepper varieties? True, not even people who
    > probably should know, can. Cilantro vs. parsley?
    > Happens every day. Not saying it doesn't bother me..
    > Because after 14 years I'm still teaching my poor dh
    > how to differentiate the latter, who has bought and
    > used (and grown!) them for as long as I have. Tsk!

    Have I ever mentioned the 27-year old university graduate I
    worked with who did not know what a citrus fruit was? This
    person was employed by the federal government yet couldn't
    even name a citrus fruit to save her life.

    rona
    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  19. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 18:31:26 GMT, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > No one works in a grocery store unless they have no
    > > other way to earn money.
    >
    >
    > I'm not sure that's true. My understanding of supermarket
    > work is that it is relatively high paying and often union
    > work-- compared to other jobs which require similar hours
    > and skills.
    >
    It's also part time work for the most part, supermarkets
    have a low profit margin and that's one way to keep
    costs down.
    >
    > We often use this group as a place to come to complain so
    > I'll say this: I drive out of my way to get to the
    > supermarket I like. I like it. Good prices, clean, no Big
    > Brother cards, helpful staff, fresh produce, etc. My only
    > complaint is a small one, and that's the variety.
    > Sometimes the store I don't like has the odd produce or
    > fish item that I want so I go there just for that.
    >

    Like my mother used to say: "You can't have everything".

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  20. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 18:31:26 GMT, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > No one works in a grocery store unless they have no
    > > other way to earn money.
    >
    >
    > I'm not sure that's true. My understanding of supermarket
    > work is that it is relatively high paying and often union
    > work-- compared to other jobs which require similar hours
    > and skills.
    >
    It's also part time work for the most part, supermarkets
    have a low profit margin and that's one way to keep
    costs down.
    >
    > We often use this group as a place to come to complain so
    > I'll say this: I drive out of my way to get to the
    > supermarket I like. I like it. Good prices, clean, no Big
    > Brother cards, helpful staff, fresh produce, etc. My only
    > complaint is a small one, and that's the variety.
    > Sometimes the store I don't like has the odd produce or
    > fish item that I want so I go there just for that.
    >

    Like my mother used to say: "You can't have everything".

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
Loading...