Michelin Axial Pro Tire Pressure

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Pj, Apr 26, 2003.

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  1. Pj

    Pj Guest

    Checking with those out there that run Michelin Axial Pro's as to what they have found as the
    optimal tire pressure. I have been running mine at 125. Thanks.
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (PJ) wrote in news:5d884f5a.0304260802.2d68b8a5 @posting.google.com:
    > Checking with those out there that run Michelin Axial Pro's as to what they have found as the
    > optimal tire pressure. I have been running mine at 125. Thanks.

    Optimal pressure depends a lot on your weight, terrain, road conditions, and tire width. On rough,
    mountainous roads, you'll probably do better with a somewhat lower pressure.
     
  3. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    95 PSI

    25's though.

    "PJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Checking with those out there that run Michelin Axial Pro's as to what they have found as the
    > optimal tire pressure. I have been running mine at 125. Thanks.
     
  4. Neil D

    Neil D Guest

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > 95 PSI
    >
    > 25's though.
    >
    >
    > "PJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Checking with those out there that run Michelin Axial Pro's as to what they have found as the
    > > optimal tire pressure. I have been running mine at 125. Thanks.
    >

    Anything under 100psi you risk snakebite flats, I've had none above 100psi but several at 90psi
    (these on 23 rear 19 front)
     
  5. On Sat, 26 Apr 2003 11:47:42 -0400, Ken wrote:

    > [email protected] (PJ) wrote in news:5d884f5a.0304260802.2d68b8a5 @posting.google.com:
    >> Checking with those out there that run Michelin Axial Pro's as to what they have found as the
    >> optimal tire pressure. I have been running mine at 125. Thanks.
    >
    > Optimal pressure depends a lot on your weight, terrain, road conditions, and tire width. On rough,
    > mountainous roads, you'll probably do better with a somewhat lower pressure.

    And a wider tire!
     
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