Replacing Old Shimano Bar End Shifters

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Magnusfarce, May 19, 2003.

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  1. Magnusfarce

    Magnusfarce Guest

    I have a Trek road bike on which I used Shimano bar end shifters for years. The handlebars needed
    replacing recently and while I could not salvage the main shifter "core" pieces that mount inside
    the handlebar ends, I did keep the actual lever parts. This turned out to be a good thing because my
    old rear derailleur system has a six-speed cluster, and all the new bar end shifters are 8 and 9
    speed. None of the shops in the area have any old ones laying around, and I didn't find any on
    e-Bay, either.

    I finally ordered a $50 replacement Shimano shifter set from one of the major houses, but before I
    tear it all the way open, I need to know if I can put my old 6 speed SIS levers on the new mounting
    core pieces. Everything looks the same, but I'm not sure what piece or pieces control the SIS
    "notches". I could just go with the friction settings, but the old system shifted perfectly in the
    SIS mode, and for climbing (the bike's main purpose now), I need fast, clean shifts. The old shift
    levers are marked as "SL-BS50" and the new ones are "SL-BS64". Any advice?

    BTW, I'm not interested in any upgrading of the power train. This bike is now strictly an exercise
    bike used for short climbing workout rides only and serves that purpose well. Thanks in advance
    for any help.

    - Magnusfarce
     
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  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    the short answer is yes, it'll work.

    Mike

    "Magnusfarce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Trek road bike on which I used Shimano bar end shifters for
    years.
    > The handlebars needed replacing recently and while I could not salvage the main shifter "core"
    > pieces that mount inside the handlebar ends, I did
    keep
    > the actual lever parts. This turned out to be a good thing because my old rear derailleur system
    > has a six-speed cluster, and all the new bar end shifters are 8 and 9 speed. None of the shops in
    > the area have any old
    ones
    > laying around, and I didn't find any on e-Bay, either.
    >
    > I finally ordered a $50 replacement Shimano shifter set from one of the major houses, but before I
    > tear it all the way open, I need to know if I
    can
    > put my old 6 speed SIS levers on the new mounting core pieces. Everything looks the same, but I'm
    > not sure what piece or pieces control the SIS "notches". I could just go with the friction
    > settings, but the old system shifted perfectly in the SIS mode, and for climbing (the bike's main
    purpose
    > now), I need fast, clean shifts. The old shift levers are marked as "SL-BS50" and the new ones are
    > "SL-BS64". Any advice?
    >
    > BTW, I'm not interested in any upgrading of the power train. This bike is now strictly an exercise
    > bike used for short climbing workout rides only
    and
    > serves that purpose well. Thanks in advance for any help.
    >
    > - Magnusfarce
     
  3. Magnusfarce <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I finally ordered a $50 replacement Shimano shifter set from one of the major houses, but before I
    > tear it all the way open, I need to know if I can put my old 6 speed SIS levers on the new
    > mounting core pieces. Everything looks the same, but I'm not sure what piece or pieces control the
    > SIS "notches".

    Yes. In fact, you can even put a downtube SIS lever on there. The indexing is inside the lever.

    > I have a Trek road bike on which I used Shimano bar end shifters for years. The handlebars needed
    > replacing recently and while I could not salvage the main shifter "core" pieces that mount inside
    > the handlebar ends, I did keep the actual lever parts.

    Is there some reason you couldn't salvage the shifter mounts? Very important tip before you mount
    the new ones: when you stick an hex wrench in to tighten the compression bolt, turn counterclockwise
    (left) to tighten, opposite of normal. This is because you are turning a hollow bolt while looking
    at the tip, not the head.
     
  4. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Magnusfarce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I finally ordered a $50 replacement Shimano shifter set from one of the major houses, but before I
    > tear it all the way open, I need to know if I can put my old 6 speed SIS levers on the new
    > mounting core pieces. Everything looks the same, but I'm not sure what piece or pieces control the
    > SIS "notches". I could just go with the friction settings, but the old system shifted perfectly in
    > the SIS mode, and for climbing (the bike's main purpose now), I need fast, clean shifts. The old
    > shift levers are marked as "SL-BS50" and the new ones are "SL-BS64". Any advice?

    What you propose is entirely practical and quite easy. The mounts that fit in the handlebar are
    identical among all of the Shimano bar-end shifters.

    A word of warning: the SL-BS50 shift levers are for 6-speed and 7-speed systems. There's a tiny grey
    plastic shim that fits in the cable groove on the shifter that changes the cable pull so they'll
    work with 6-speed clusters. If it's gone, you may be SOL. (I have a set which are 13 years old and
    still shift perfectly in 7-speed mode.)

    For trivia buffs: SL-BS50-8 is Dura-Ace 8-speed, SL-BS64 is non-Dura-Ace 8-speed, SL-BS77
    is 9-speed.

    Jeff
     
  5. Magnusfarce

    Magnusfarce Guest

    Sorry to waste the bandwidth, but I had to say thanks for the help, fellas. This is the perfect use
    of the internet: quick, reliable information almost at your fingertips. Appreciate it.

    - Magnusfarce

    "Magnusfarce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Trek road bike on which I used Shimano bar end shifters for
    years.
    > The handlebars needed replacing recently and while I could not salvage the main shifter "core"
    > pieces that mount inside the handlebar ends, I did
    keep
    > the actual lever parts. This turned out to be a good thing because my old rear derailleur system
    > has a six-speed cluster, and all the new bar end shifters are 8 and 9 speed. None of the shops in
    > the area have any old
    ones
    > laying around, and I didn't find any on e-Bay, either.
    >
    > I finally ordered a $50 replacement Shimano shifter set from one of the major houses, but before I
    > tear it all the way open, I need to know if I
    can
    > put my old 6 speed SIS levers on the new mounting core pieces. Everything looks the same, but I'm
    > not sure what piece or pieces control the SIS "notches". I could just go with the friction
    > settings, but the old system shifted perfectly in the SIS mode, and for climbing (the bike's main
    purpose
    > now), I need fast, clean shifts. The old shift levers are marked as "SL-BS50" and the new ones are
    > "SL-BS64". Any advice?
    >
    > BTW, I'm not interested in any upgrading of the power train. This bike is now strictly an exercise
    > bike used for short climbing workout rides only
    and
    > serves that purpose well. Thanks in advance for any help.
    >
    > - Magnusfarce
     
  6. The indexing "notches" are inside the lever mechanism. I have a six-seven speed set, probably the
    same as yours. The mounting bracket/core is just that.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  7. <snip> "Magnusfarce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... I could not salvage the
    > main shifter "core" pieces that mount inside the handlebar ends, I did
    keep
    > the actual lever parts........

    FWIW, the "core" is removed by turning the inside bolt with an allen wrench *clockwise.* Also, on a
    trashed handlebar, you should be able to cut or dremmel them out if all else fails.

    Regards, Larry
     
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