Slime Filled Tubes

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Sir Ride-A-Lot, Dec 23, 2003.

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  1. Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.
     
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  2. Sir Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.

    You wrote slimefilled tubes but I figure you mean slimefilled tires. For instance a product like
    Stans no Tubes. If not flush my answer down the tube ( pun intended). I haven't tried the slime but
    I do ride UST. I would imagine filling your tires up with slime would kinda take away a lot of the
    feeling of having tubeless. I have the Mavic UST rims and my first impression was how thin and light
    my MTB tires ( Schwalbe Jimmy) felt when inflated to about 35 psi. With a bunch of slime inside I
    imagine it wouldn't feel that way. Maybe Stans no tubes is different and I've heard alot of UST
    riders use it to keep the pressure even on their USTs. I haven't found that necessary probably
    because I always have pumped my tires before every ride I do. Well OK, not the commuter ;)

    Now let's look at the basics. Why are tubeless supposedly superior. Well it's to avoid snakebite
    flats and thus being able to run a lower pressure in the tires for greater traction etc. This all
    seems to be true with my UST tires. Hence I think the question you should ask about slime filled
    tires or Stans No Tubes is this. Does it not only work as far as being able to discard a tube, but
    does it also enable me to ride with lower pressure and keep me from getting snakebite flats. Well
    evidently the snakebites in the tube won't be there but will the tire roll off the rim as easy as
    before. If it still rolls off the rim like before then we haven't gained anything by riding tubeless
    except for the expense of the tube.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  3. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    Sir Ride-A-Lot wrote:
    > Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.

    No there are such things as slime-filled tubes. I don't use them so I can't comment...

    --
    - Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
     
  4. Gwood

    Gwood Guest

    I bought and used them after missing an epic ride in Hell's Canyon due to flats. I usually carry
    two spare tubes and a patch kit. Within 100 yards of riding from the trailhead, we rode over a
    concealed "puncture vine". Four flats with probably a hundred punctures in each tire/tube. It
    became a hiking day...

    I replaced one set of tires completely and thought some of the thorns might re-appear in the other
    set (even tho I scraped 'em down well), so I bought the slimer tubes. They are heavier, but don't
    handle much differently otherwise. Two days later we did the downhiller from the local mountain top
    (took the lazy way up ;-) ). They held together just fine, and as expected, there were a couple of
    re-appearing thorns. If you get a puncture (at least a small one), a bubble of green comes out,
    then seals up. Probably if I take those tires off, it'll be pretty messy inside. I still have them
    on my hardtail, and if I was doing a late-season run through the blackberries out here, I'd be
    using those wheels...

    Gary

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <Sir.Ride-a-Lot> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.
     
  5. Tom Purvis

    Tom Purvis Guest

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <Sir.Ride-a-Lot> wrote:
    > Do they work, or is it just a waste of time?

    Depends on what you want them to do for you. If you want to be able to pick up cactus thorns or
    goatheads without needing to completely change your tube, yes, they work pretty well.

    > I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.

    Ah, do you want to go tubeless because you can run lower pressure without pinch flatting all the
    time? If so, then no, they don't work and yes, they are a waste of time.

    Pinch flats happen to slimy fellers like myself. When they do, they are a PITA. Slime tubes don't
    just pinch flat, they pinch flat and then fill your tire with a messy wad of goo.

    Then they are harder to patch than non-slime. And their effectivness with the problems they can
    prevent in the future is reduced (because you've lost some of the slime).

    What tends to happen to me is that I get some kind of puncture, and the slime keeps me from going
    flat. But I lose enough pressure to become vulnerable to pinch flats. Then of course I pinch flat.
    Then I use bad words. Then I put in a spare non- slime tube. Then Murphy's Law (or my lack of
    patience looking for old thorns embedded in my tire) causes my spare tube to go flat. Then I use
    more bad words and check to see if I still have a patch kit in my pack. Then I say something mean
    to my pump.

    Seriously though, I run slime but I also try to be diligent about checking my tire pressure. When
    you run slime for a while you develop a tolerance for slow leaks. So you either check tire pressure
    at the beginning of the ride, or curse yourself for failing to do so (after yelling at your pump).
    --
    Tom Purvis - http://www.arkansasvalley.net/tpurvis/
    Salida, CO
     
  6. Gwood wrote:
    > I bought and used them after missing an epic ride in Hell's Canyon due to flats. I usually carry
    > two spare tubes and a patch kit. Within 100 yards of riding from the trailhead, we rode over a
    > concealed "puncture vine". Four flats with probably a hundred punctures in each tire/tube. It
    > became a hiking day...
    >
    > I replaced one set of tires completely and thought some of the thorns might re-appear in the other
    > set (even tho I scraped 'em down well), so I bought the slimer tubes. They are heavier, but don't
    > handle much differently otherwise. Two days later we did the downhiller from the local mountain
    > top (took the lazy way up ;-) ). They held together just fine, and as expected, there were a
    > couple of re-appearing thorns. If you get a puncture (at least a small one), a bubble of green
    > comes out, then seals up. Probably if I take those tires off, it'll be pretty messy inside. I
    > still have them on my hardtail, and if I was doing a late-season run through the blackberries out
    > here, I'd be using those wheels...
    >
    > Gary
    >
    >
    > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <Sir.Ride-a-Lot> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.

    If we are on the same page, the ones that I have in the box are called Slime Self Healing Tubes. If
    what you say is correct, they are going on the rims tomorrow.
     
  7. Bill Porter

    Bill Porter Guest

    On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 13:32:09 -0500, "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <Sir.Ride-a-Lot>
    wrote:

    >Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.
    >

    I have been using the Slime-Lite tubes. Basically a lighter tube, with not as much slime in it and I
    have been very happy with them. I have only gone through two sets of them in about in about 900 or
    so off road miles and four 24hr events. They where retired as they had taken care of 12-20 thorns
    each over time and had no more slime left to give and developed slow leaks. A pretty good investment
    in tubes and time savings alone IMHO.

    Bill Porter www.mountainbikebill.com
     
  8. Gwood

    Gwood Guest

    There may be differing varieties out there, can't recall specifically which ones we bought. They
    were the only schraeder valve tubes available in the tiny bike shop in Joseph, Oregon, at the time.
    I guess that says something in itself...

    The principle is the same for all of them. Take a regular tube, add a few ounces of "slime" liquid
    inside. Not sure what property of the liquid makes it seal a puncture and not just coagulate in the
    tube, but I haven't noticed any balance issues with the wheels. I beleive the tubes are 30-40%
    heavier than regular ones, if that is an issue.

    What conditions are you riding that makes them of interst to you ?

    Cheers Gary

    "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Gwood wrote:
    > > I bought and used them after missing an epic ride in Hell's Canyon due to flats. I usually carry
    > > two spare tubes and a patch kit. Within 100 yards of riding from the trailhead, we rode over a
    > > concealed "puncture vine". Four flats with probably a hundred punctures in each tire/tube. It
    > > became a hiking day...

    > > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <Sir.Ride-a-Lot> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.
    >
    > If we are on the same page, the ones that I have in the box are called
    Slime
    > Self Healing Tubes. If what you say is correct, they are going on the
    rims
    > tomorrow.
     
  9. Phil

    Phil Guest

    Sir Ride-A-Lot said:

    >Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.

    Slime tubes are heavy!

    How about SpinSkins (tire liners)? Have you ever tried them? Yes, they are expensive. No, they won't
    last forever. But they do work well for me at preventing flats from the thorny vines in this part of
    the country. I'm a believer...

    --
    Phil

    X-No-Archive: yes is in the headers

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  10. Gwood wrote:
    > There may be differing varieties out there, can't recall specifically which ones we bought. They
    > were the only schraeder valve tubes available in the tiny bike shop in Joseph, Oregon, at the
    > time. I guess that says something in itself...
    >
    > The principle is the same for all of them. Take a regular tube, add a few ounces of "slime" liquid
    > inside. Not sure what property of the liquid makes it seal a puncture and not just coagulate in
    > the tube, but I haven't noticed any balance issues with the wheels. I beleive the tubes are 30-40%
    > heavier than regular ones, if that is an issue.
    >
    > What conditions are you riding that makes them of interst to you ?
    >
    > Cheers Gary
    >
    > "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]net...
    >>
    >>
    >> Gwood wrote:
    >>> I bought and used them after missing an epic ride in Hell's Canyon due to flats. I usually carry
    >>> two spare tubes and a patch kit. Within 100 yards of riding from the trailhead, we rode over a
    >>> concealed "puncture vine". Four flats with probably a hundred punctures in each tire/tube. It
    >>> became a hiking day...
    >
    >>> "Sir Ride-A-Lot" <Sir.Ride-a-Lot> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>> Do they work, or is it just a waste of time? I just can't bite the bullet and go tubeless yet.
    >>
    >> If we are on the same page, the ones that I have in the box are called Slime Self Healing Tubes.
    >> If what you say is correct, they are going on the rims tomorrow.

    Weight is not an issue as I normally run DH tubes anyway. Conditions are run very rocky (shale and
    granite) to loamy sand with thorny vines.
     
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