What's your favorite beer?



Ruedy

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Jun 17, 2004
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OK. Here's a subject I think won't start an argument.

What's your favorite beer?

I've got many I like but an old standby for me is St. Pauli Girl Dark.
 

LottomagicZ4941

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Oct 6, 2004
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It would be the one in my hand if I had one.

I like Bud Ice, Dry beers. Favorite N/A is Miller but I don't generally like Miller.

I like Becks Dark but have not tried St Polly Girl Dark. Hated their N/A.

I like a few micro brews in the area. 90 Shilling out of Fort Collins but rarely pay up the extra cost these days.

Had Budwiser today as that is all the restraunt I ate at carried.

Current favorite Bass Ale.
 

Dr.Hairybiker

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Aug 23, 2004
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My all time favorite is a home brewed beer my buddy makes from a kit. I think it's one of the John Bull kits. Very heavy and meady. Easy to drink even when it's warm. Greatest after-ride drink ever! I love Corona in the summer when it's hot outside. Budweiser is good for breakfast.
 

MountainPro

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Aug 11, 2004
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No all time fravourite but i am rather partial to San Miguel, Tennents (local beer), Guinness and most Czech beers.

I cant be arsed with all these silly low-carb beers anymore...
 

jhuskey

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Oct 6, 2003
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Ruedy said:
OK. Here's a subject I think won't start an argument.

What's your favorite beer?

I've got many I like but an old standby for me is St. Pauli Girl Dark.

Oh yeah, Well...... Great Taste........ No! Less Filling!
My favorite is the next one I am going to have but I tend to vary my taste depending on my mood.
Sometimes a Killian Red is great with a Deli Sandwich but the local mini brewery has a sample tray which lets you try all their wares.
Like a kid in a candy store.
 

nick burns

New Member
Oct 15, 2004
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Sierra Nevada Pale Ale
Guinness Stout
Sam Smith Nut Brown Ale
Pilsner Urquell
Victory Hop Devil IPA
 

cuervo

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Mar 23, 2004
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Victoria
Tecate
Sol

From Bay Area (wish I where there ...) Anchor´s Steam is the best I know.
 

OCRoadie

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Oct 5, 2004
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50
Newcastle
Corona
Samuel Smith's Nut Brown (nice pick Nick Burns)
Samule Smith's Winter Welcome Ale
Michelob
 

Jupiler

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Aug 1, 2004
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Jupiler of course! :D


Also Duvel, Westmalle (great after a long ride), Carlsberg, Guinness.

Sorry but no American beers for me, thanks! Also no heineken, coronas, maes and other **** beers.
 

eric_the_red

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Aug 28, 2003
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Mostly drink my homebrew, because most of the beer sold in this part of the world isn't worth drinking, and the few that are are not cheap. But I was back in the UK last month and had a few pints of Timothy Taylor's Landlord, very nice, makes my mouth water just writing about it.
 

ubdawg

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Aug 20, 2004
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Second vote for the Sam Smith Winter Welcome.
Also, Sweetwater 420 out of Atlanta
90 Schilling out of Colorado
and i still miss Celis(hated to see them go)
 

jhuskey

Moderator
Oct 6, 2003
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eric_the_red said:
Mostly drink my homebrew, because most of the beer sold in this part of the world isn't worth drinking, and the few that are are not cheap. But I was back in the UK last month and had a few pints of Timothy Taylor's Landlord, very nice, makes my mouth water just writing about it.

Is that beer you are referring to or a malt and yeast fermented derivative?
That would be what I am familiar with as "Homebrew"
 

Azulene

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Dec 4, 2003
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Ruedy said:
OK. Here's a subject I think won't start an argument.

What's your favorite beer?

I've got many I like but an old standby for me is St. Pauli Girl Dark.

Luckly Lap Pub micro-brew Dog Day IPA (India Pale Ale)
A high gravity and highly hopped beer originally made for travel from England to India in the 1800s.
 

Weisse Luft

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May 28, 2004
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jhuskey said:
Is that beer you are referring to or a malt and yeast fermented derivative?
That would be what I am familiar with as "Homebrew"
Technically speaking, any fermented beverage made from any malted grain and using either saccaromyces cervisiae or s. uvarium as the yeast is a beer.

The beer commonly found in stores is typically fermented with the latter, sometimes called s. carlsburggenesis. This yeast produces a lager, so named because it must be stored or aged cold to drop the yeast out of suspension. It also ferments at cooler temperatures.

Homebrews can be much closer to traditional beers because the malt is usually from one type of grain. A single malt in other words. Most commercial beer uses a different type of barley which allows use of cheaper grains due to higher enzyme levels in this six row barley. Traditional malts are made from two row and have only enough enzymes to convert the starchy endosperm into a fermentable mix of sugars.

Yes, one can brew lagers at home. A spare refrigerator, set up for higher temperatures (50 F), are commonly used to keep the brewing process at the right temperature.

I brew my own from scratch. Well, I buy malted barley for $28 per hundred pounds. That makes about 40 gallons. Total cost with hops and yeast is still under $1 per gallon and its far better than what you can buy in the store.

My favorite is a coffee stout which I developed long before Drew Carey and Buzz beer. I crystalize a portion of the malt with cracked coffee beans...
 

KayEm

New Member
Oct 13, 2004
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Weisse Luft said:
Technically speaking, any fermented beverage made from any malted grain and using either saccaromyces cervisiae or s. uvarium as the yeast is a beer.

The beer commonly found in stores is typically fermented with the latter, sometimes called s. carlsburggenesis. This yeast produces a lager, so named because it must be stored or aged cold to drop the yeast out of suspension. It also ferments at cooler temperatures.

Homebrews can be much closer to traditional beers because the malt is usually from one type of grain. A single malt in other words. Most commercial beer uses a different type of barley which allows use of cheaper grains due to higher enzyme levels in this six row barley. Traditional malts are made from two row and have only enough enzymes to convert the starchy endosperm into a fermentable mix of sugars.

Yes, one can brew lagers at home. A spare refrigerator, set up for higher temperatures (50 F), are commonly used to keep the brewing process at the right temperature.

I brew my own from scratch. Well, I buy malted barley for $28 per hundred pounds. That makes about 40 gallons. Total cost with hops and yeast is still under $1 per gallon and its far better than what you can buy in the store.

My favorite is a coffee stout which I developed long before Drew Carey and Buzz beer. I crystalize a portion of the malt with cracked coffee beans...


Better be careful, with a knowledge like that you'll be asked to join CAMRA :D
My preference - either Warsteiner or Marstons Pedigree.
 

jhuskey

Moderator
Oct 6, 2003
10,606
676
113
Weisse Luft said:
Technically speaking, any fermented beverage made from any malted grain and using either saccaromyces cervisiae or s. uvarium as the yeast is a beer.

The beer commonly found in stores is typically fermented with the latter, sometimes called s. carlsburggenesis. This yeast produces a lager, so named because it must be stored or aged cold to drop the yeast out of suspension. It also ferments at cooler temperatures.

Homebrews can be much closer to traditional beers because the malt is usually from one type of grain. A single malt in other words. Most commercial beer uses a different type of barley which allows use of cheaper grains due to higher enzyme levels in this six row barley. Traditional malts are made from two row and have only enough enzymes to convert the starchy endosperm into a fermentable mix of sugars.

Yes, one can brew lagers at home. A spare refrigerator, set up for higher temperatures (50 F), are commonly used to keep the brewing process at the right temperature.

I brew my own from scratch. Well, I buy malted barley for $28 per hundred pounds. That makes about 40 gallons. Total cost with hops and yeast is still under $1 per gallon and its far better than what you can buy in the store.

My favorite is a coffee stout which I developed long before Drew Carey and Buzz beer. I crystalize a portion of the malt with cracked coffee beans...


Yes I know my father made it from malt syrup and yeast. I was just wondering if the recipe was similar or was something closer to traditional beer you would find in any bar.
He also made some mean moonshine.
 

Azulene

New Member
Dec 4, 2003
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A new German beer claims to be an anti-aging tonic.
Klosterbraueri Neuzelle, a former monastery brewery in Neuzelle, Germany, says it has developed a beer named Bathbeer that is designed to slow the aging process. The beverage contains vitamins, minerals and an algae called spirulina.
The beer, which is expected to be introduced this week, claims to provide rejuvenation through either drinking or dabbing on the skin. In addition to Germany, it will be released in the United States, Poland and South Korea.
The drink, like any other alcoholic beverage, can cause intoxication and, of course, hangovers. "Please be advised, that our anti aging beer contains alcohol, 4.8 percent," the label says.
Interestingly, one problem with the beer is that its manufacture might not be legal under Germany's beer purity regulation. The Reinheitsgebot, as it is called, is the world's oldest valid law, dating from 1516. It requires that beer contain only four ingredients: hops, barley, yeast and water.
The matter is expected to be taken up in court soon, and the brewery could be required to label the product something other than beer.
As for whether or not it really does work as any anti-aging tonic, if the brew doesn't do anything when you dab it on your skin, you can always go the traditional route and use it to drown your sorrows.

I wounder if it will make us a better Cyclist? At my age I will need to buy it by the keg.
 

eric_the_red

New Member
Aug 28, 2003
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Azulene said:
A new German beer claims to be an anti-aging tonic.
Klosterbraueri Neuzelle, a former monastery brewery in Neuzelle, Germany, says it has developed a beer named Bathbeer that is designed to slow the aging process. The beverage contains vitamins, minerals and an algae called spirulina.
The beer, which is expected to be introduced this week, claims to provide rejuvenation through either drinking or dabbing on the skin. In addition to Germany, it will be released in the United States, Poland and South Korea.
The drink, like any other alcoholic beverage, can cause intoxication and, of course, hangovers. "Please be advised, that our anti aging beer contains alcohol, 4.8 percent," the label says.
Interestingly, one problem with the beer is that its manufacture might not be legal under Germany's beer purity regulation. The Reinheitsgebot, as it is called, is the world's oldest valid law, dating from 1516. It requires that beer contain only four ingredients: hops, barley, yeast and water.
The matter is expected to be taken up in court soon, and the brewery could be required to label the product something other than beer.
As for whether or not it really does work as any anti-aging tonic, if the brew doesn't do anything when you dab it on your skin, you can always go the traditional route and use it to drown your sorrows.

I wounder if it will make us a better Cyclist?

A few beers always makes me smarter :) , as for a better cyclist, more testing is needed.