50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Theta, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Markositious Probertositious" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:43Tjb.25967$%[email protected]
    > > Chris, try being married to one like I am. She gets to school 90 minutes
    > > before her first class, and spends hours at night reviewing and grading
    > > papers.
    > >
    > > A good teacher spends hours preparing for class, since a good teacher

    > adapts
    > > and customizes lessons, etc. for the class. One size does not fit all.
    > >
    > > She works harder than her students, as she is setting an example for

    them.
    > > They know it, and, by the time Oct. 1 rolls around, they are working as

    > hard
    > > as she does. It is called educational leadership.

    >
    > I never said the teachers don't work hard. I am just doubting that they

    work
    > so much harder than many other professionals. 5 hours of direct teaching
    > time plus 4 hours of prep time is still 9 hours per day which is not
    > uncommon. And the other professionals don't get nearly as much time off

    and
    > often (usually?) are not paid 5 figure incomes.


    Five figure incomes? Sounds pretty cushy when you put it that way. But
    when you say $35,000 a year, it isn't quite so pretty. Please tell me a
    profession which is not paid a five figure income.

    > And once again - I'm not saying they don' t have legitimate gripes - just
    > that I don't think the work schedule is one of them (other than the no
    > bathroom break thing - that is tough).


    What profession requires the person to be "on task" for an extended period
    of time--other than doctors and air traffic controllers?
    ~Cate

    --
    "Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    Benjamin Franklin
     


  2. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "teachrmama" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > > > And the other professionals don't get nearly as much time off
    > > > > and often (usually?) are not paid 5 figure incomes.
    > > >
    > > > Which professions are you talking about that pay less than $10,000 a

    > year?
    > >
    > >
    > > I have a feeling that math was not CBI's strongest subject in school!
    > > <chuckle>

    >
    > Sad thing is that it was (at least one of them). When I first registered

    for
    > college it was as a math major. I took the physics classes for engineers
    > instead of the ones for pre-meds and did pretty well in them.
    >
    > For some reason I have always had trouble expressing numbers in terms of

    the
    > number of "figures."


    You didn't answer the question. What profession pays less than $10,000 a
    year? Or $30,000 a year?
    ~Cate
     
  3. "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Bob LeChevalier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >Even if the hours worked per day comes out to 8-9 that still is not
    >> >uncommonly high,

    >>
    >> It is abusive in the land of the 40 hour workweek to take advantage of
    >> labor laws to extract extra time from professional employees for free.

    >
    >Umm ..... 5 x 8 = 40.


    5 x 9 = 45.

    >> >especially for someone who considers themselves an educated professional.

    >>
    >> The difference is that it is pretty continuous throughout the school
    >> year; there is no comp time. Normally professionals have peaks and
    >> valleys, and after a crunch period get little flak if they want to
    >> take a half day to recuperate.

    >
    >I don't know anyone who would consider an 8 hour day "crunch time". It is
    >the norm.


    It has already been noted that many if not most teachers spend far
    more than 8 hours a day.

    >> >Even if you take the Thanksgiving break, Christmas break,
    >> >spring break, etc and treat them as paid vacation time

    >>
    >> As has been pointed out, teachers don't get paid holidays.

    >
    >By what definition do teachers not get paid hollidays but everyone else
    >does?


    Simple. They have a contract for 180 or 200 working days. Their
    salary is divided by the number of days in the contract. If they miss
    a working day, they lose that portion of their pay. The standard
    worker, by comparison, gets paid on the basis of 261-odd working days
    per year, of which some are holidays. They get paid for the holidays.
    The get paid for the vacation days. They get paid for sick, and
    bereavement, and various other kinds of days. If they miss a working
    day, and it isn't cover by one of the leaves, they lose approximately
    1/261 of their annual salary, not 1/180.

    >Do you not get a check during the Chrismas break?


    I'm not a teacher. When a teacher gets paid is specified in the
    contract and it varies.

    >> They also don't get paid during that time either.

    >
    >Right - they don't get paid during the two months they have totally off.


    But other professionals get paid for vacations.

    >Why should they? If they did it would amount to a total of something like 12-14
    >weeks vacation per year.


    Nope. More like 9 weeks.

    >During that two months they can either take the time or supplement their income.


    They cannot likely supplement their income at the hourly equivalent of
    their salary.

    >> >Teachers have many legitimate gripes. The schedule is not one of them.

    >>
    >> That is why attrition in teachers is close to 50% in the first 5
    >> years. The job is SO easy, and all those perqs, eh?

    >
    >I never said the job was easy and I did say that teachers do have many
    >legitimate gripes. I would assume they are leaving due to them. If they are
    >leaving over dissatisfaction with the hours worked then I think they must be
    >having some rude awakenings when they look elsewhere because I know of no
    >other profession that routinely has a lesser schedule.


    College professors typically teach 6 to 10 hours per week, and may
    keep a couple extra hours of scheduled office hours. The rest of
    their time is discretionary, though they have to spend some of it on
    prep work and research and faculty meetings.

    My wife, though she has intermittent overtime (but also is allowed
    comp time), has a 35 hour week.

    lojbab
    --
    lojbab [email protected]
    Bob LeChevalier, Founder, The Logical Language Group
    (Opinions are my own; I do not speak for the organization.)
    Artificial language Loglan/Lojban: http://www.lojban.org
     
  4. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Seveigny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Five figure incomes? Sounds pretty cushy when you put it that way. But
    > when you say $35,000 a year, it isn't quite so pretty. Please tell me a
    > profession which is not paid a five figure income.


    I think you missed the joke.
     
  5. Joni Rathbun

    Joni Rathbun Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003, Seveigny wrote:

    >
    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > But I work more than 8 hours a day. I'm only PAID for 7.5 of the hours
    > > > I work though.

    > >
    > > If that is how your contract is worded then that is a legitimate gripe. My
    > > impression is that mosyt teacher's contracts are not worded to include how
    > > many hours they are to work (there may be a clause about minimum times to

    > be
    > > on campus but not how many hours to work).

    >
    > Okay, let me get this straight. According your "impression" most teacher's
    > contracts are not worded to include how many hours they are to work although
    > you do acknowledge there "may" be a clause about minimum times to be on
    > campus.


    I think he's just guessing about contracts. Not only does my contract
    tell me how many days, it defines those days in terms of hours and minutes
    worked AND it says if we are in danger of going over those hours, the
    principal is to give us a day off so that we work only the time
    specified in the contract. I have forgotten what the term is they use.
    It's more apt to happen to a teacher in one of our many year round
    schools than in a 10 month school where I work.

    BTW, my previous contract was very much the same. It spelled out
    how long each contracted day was to the hour and the minute.

    What do you think our employers expect us to do while we are on
    > campus? Eat bon bons and watch soap operas? I arrive on campus at 7:30.
    > From 7:30 to 8:00 I prepare to teach. From 8:00 to 9:30 I teach, from 9:40
    > to 11:10, I teach. I have a "duty free lunch period" during which I usually
    > meet with students, grade papers or prepare for my afternoon class. From
    > 12:00 to 1:30, I teach. I have a prep period from 1:40 to 3:10. During
    > that time I meet with parents, work with students, grade papers, make
    > photocopies, enter grades in my grade book, go to IEP or 504
    > meetings....Three Tuesdays out of every month I'm in a department or faculty
    > meeting which starts at 3:30 and ends at 4:30. Oddly enough, our employers
    > expect us to work when we at work, just like every other employer.
    > ~Cate
    >
     
  6. Joni Rathbun

    Joni Rathbun Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003, Seveigny wrote:

    >
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > >
    > > On Sun, 19 Oct 2003, CBI wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:p[email protected]
    > > > >
    > > > > Ever noticed what happens when a district tries to add days to a
    > > > > teacher's work year?
    > > >
    > > > Yeah, the teachers object.

    > >
    > >
    > > Well, most teachers I know are all for it - as long as they are paid for
    > > those days.
    > >

    > This is my experience as well. Most teachers I know would like to see the
    > school year lenghtened because of the tremendous amount of "dislearning"
    > which takes place over the summer. The school schedule, as it exists, is
    > antiquated. Students need to spend more time in school. With all the
    > hootin and hollerin that takes place about excellence in education, no move
    > has been made to extend the school year. How come?
    > ~Cate


    It certainly couldn't be money. This is the richest nation in the world.
     
  7. Nessa

    Nessa Guest

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 19:01:12 -0400, Mark D Morin wrote
    (in message <[email protected]>):

    > On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 15:16:15 -0700, Joni Rathbun
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> On Sat, 18 Oct 2003, Mark D Morin wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 14:26:35 -0700, "teachrmama" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Have you not been following this thread? In my district, we are paid for
    >>>> 183 days. Period! That's it!! Only 183 days. Three days are set up
    >>>> and
    >>>> clean up days at the beginning and end of the school year. And the other
    >>>> 180 days are IN THE
    >>>> CLASSROOM WITH THE CHILDREN. I get *$0* for winter break. *$0*
    >>>> for spring break. *$0* for Veteran's Day, Memorial Day, Thanksgiving,
    >>>> etc. I only get paid for my 183 contracted days. My husband, on the
    >>>> other
    >>>> hand, gets paid a full day for Veteran's Day, Memorial Day, Christmas,
    >>>> Thanksgiving, etc, even though he is not working those days. By what
    >>>> definition do you call days I do not get paid for "paid holidays"?
    >>>
    >>> If you are like most teachers you have your income from those 183 days
    >>> dispursed over 9-10 months--vacations included. Functionally, I don't
    >>> see much of a distinction between that set up and calling it a paid
    >>> holiday. Yes, I've been a teacher and come from a teaching family.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> If they were paid, then the amount I have to distribute over those
    >> 12 months would be larger.

    >
    > unless the base pay for the 183 days plus holidays was factored into
    > the contracted amount for those 183 days. In that case if they were
    > not paid holidays, you would have less to distribute through the 12
    > months.
    >
    >>
    >> It is irrelevant how I distribute my income. Do you get paid
    >> monthly? Does that mean you are paid for weekends too?

    >
    > I'm salaried. Yet if there is a holiday during the week, my check for
    > that week is 4/5ths of my base. That's what *I* call not getting paid
    > for holidays.



    I am salaried. I work I get paid. I earn leave both annual and sick leave.
    If I have leave on days I can't work, I get paid for them. Otherwise I take
    LWOP ( Leave without pay) and then I don't get paid. I have an hourly rate
    and I am paid based on a 40 hour week. If I work more than 40 hours I get
    compensation in the form of credit time. Every hour worked earns me an hour
    off at a later time.

    My BF is paid hourly. he drives a school bus. If he drives he gets paid.
    If he doesn't drive he doesn't get paid. This means that when we have snow
    days he doesn't get paid. If he has to drive past the end of school to make
    up for those days he gets paid for the days he drives nothing more nothing
    less. He earns no leave either annual or sick.

    we are both paid based on hourly work. the difference is the BENEFITS. I
    earn leave he does not.

    Nessa
    --
    I don't have issues
    I have subscriptions
    www.nessa.info
     
  8. john

    john Guest

    "Markositious Probertositious" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<jjEjb.8823$%[email protected]>...

    Found your real name at last I see! I knew that alleged birth name
    didn't do you justice! Seems to cover you perfectly.


    Sitious--19 century term for seditious?: "On my return I saw no
    disposition manifested or heard any language used by any person at the
    Court House that was violent or sitious."

    Pernicious--wicked or malicious

    Malicious--motivated by wrongful, vicious or mischievous purposes

    Seditious--causing sedition which is speech or behaviour against the
    peace of a state, or incitement to public disorder.


    Darth Sidious http://www.theforce.net/episode1/oldPreq/characters/sidious.html

    "Cloaked in flowing robes and shrouded in evil, Darth Sidious is a
    Dark Lord of the Sith and the mysterious power behind the Trade
    Federation's blockade of Naboo. As he conspires and manipulates, he
    keeps his presence - and his true intentions - well hidden."
     
  9. So the issue is whether school holidays are "paid" or not? One can
    certainly view them as such, but there are two arguments that indicate
    CLEARLY that they are not. The first is the percentage or fraction of
    pay deducted when missing a day of school. This is NOT based on a
    total that includes holidays, therefore holidays are not being paid.

    For those who reject that argument (on whatever grounds), I offer the
    following which I consider conclusive: There have been occasions when
    I and my colleagues HAVE worked during a vacation or holiday period.
    We were ALWAYS paid a per diem for that work. Therefore, CLEARLY, the
    district does not consider vacation or holidays as being "paid".
    Since THEY are the employer, and since THEY have a vested interest in
    considering these as "paid vacations" and DO NOT, then CLEARLY they
    ARE NOT "paid vacations".

    In the face of both arguments, anyone claiming we have "paid
    vacations" is either illogical, unable to read, or purposefully dense.
    Whether or not this constitutes a major or useful gripe for teachers
    is an interesting, but hardly relevant point (at least in the context
    of this discussion).
     
  10. On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 20:38:09 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"toto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 02:45:20 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Ah, but they are not paid vacation time. Teachers are paid only for
    >> the time we are in school. The vacation time is *not* paid for.

    >
    >I think with this argument you guys are just rearranging the deck chairs.
    >You contract for a certain number of days (usually about 180) over a certain
    >period of time (usually approx Sept into June) and get a paycheck regularly
    >during that time frame. Most people would call a week where you don't go
    >into work and do recieve a check a paid vacaion.


    Then again, people can consider a duck and a chicken the same because
    they both have wings. In the argument I presented elsewhere, there is
    no legitimate way to claim that days not in school are "paid", anymore
    than weekends out of the office are "paid". It's the same thing,
    since working on those days requires additional pay in both cases.
     
  11. Joni Rathbun

    Joni Rathbun Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 [email protected] wrote:

    > So the issue is whether school holidays are "paid" or not? One can
    > certainly view them as such, but there are two arguments that indicate
    > CLEARLY that they are not. The first is the percentage or fraction of
    > pay deducted when missing a day of school. This is NOT based on a
    > total that includes holidays, therefore holidays are not being paid.
    >
    > For those who reject that argument (on whatever grounds), I offer the
    > following which I consider conclusive: There have been occasions when
    > I and my colleagues HAVE worked during a vacation or holiday period.
    > We were ALWAYS paid a per diem for that work. Therefore, CLEARLY, the
    > district does not consider vacation or holidays as being "paid".
    > Since THEY are the employer, and since THEY have a vested interest in
    > considering these as "paid vacations" and DO NOT, then CLEARLY they
    > ARE NOT "paid vacations".
    >
    > In the face of both arguments, anyone claiming we have "paid
    > vacations" is either illogical, unable to read, or purposefully dense.
    > Whether or not this constitutes a major or useful gripe for teachers
    > is an interesting, but hardly relevant point (at least in the context
    > of this discussion).
    >


    According to my contract I am a 184 day teacher. Furthermore, "Classroom
    teachers covered by this Agreement shall be required to work at the
    school premises a regular workday of seven (7) hours and eleven (11)
    minutes including the duty-free lunch period provided.

    "The teachers assigned to work additional days beyond the one
    hundred and eighty-four (184) shall be compensated at their daily rate for
    each day worked beyond the one hundred and eighty-four (184)
    school days." I get 15 of these days.

    If my "holiday breaks" were paid, my salary would be approximately
    $5000 more than it is per year.

    If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    And there are reasons why I could be paid to work on some holiday
    break days. Student functions routinely take place during some of
    those break periods so it is the case that some teachers do work
    them officially and DO get paid additional money accordingly.

    My supervisor is limited to *requiring* me to work beyond the
    defined work day, three (3) times a year:

    "It is recognized that certain meetings for educational, not
    extra-curricular, activities may be scheduled to extend beyond the day
    without additional compensation for the
    purposes listed below:

    22-5-1 Attendance at general faculty meetings.
    22-5-2 Special meetings may be called by the superintendent or school
    principal.

    It is agreed, however, that there shall be no more than three (3) such
    meetings per school year. Reasonable notice shall be given."

    At my current school this generally means attendance is required
    at open house and a couple other whole-school functions selected by
    our principal, functions that take place beyond the identified work day.

    Anything else is strictly voluntary tho funds have been set aside
    for some purposes, e.g., selling tickets at a football game generally
    earns a person $20 per game night. Chaperoning a dance earns a person
    nothing - financially speaking.

    This is all pretty much as it was in my previous district as well.
    Main differences were that our contract days were longer there and we
    could be held for one additional hour per week (vs three functions
    per year).
     
  12. I think we've found the problem. YOUR teacher contract was apparently
    different from what the vast majority of us sign every year or every 3
    years.
    My contract specifies the number of DAYS I work, not the time period.
    It says 216 days. My school has far fewer holidays/days
    off/student-less periods than most public schools, and we have a summer
    session that 75% of our students attend.
    My last district cut 2 days off the contract because we didn't use them.
    Theyw were snow-make up days, and we'd had no snow. They didn't pay
    us for those days. I lost 2 days of pay with no warning.

    Magi

    Mark D Morin wrote:
    >>And so, when my old district cut
    >>10 days off the school year last year, they had to renegotiate
    >>the contract with the district. Teachers gave up 10 days worth
    >>of pay to the penney. And when my current district added days to some
    >>teachers' contract here, they had to increase pay by the number of days
    >>added.

    >
    >
    > You are still missing the point. You are talking about renegotiating
    > contracts. There has to be some way to do that (and yes, there are
    > ways other than per diem factoring). The contracts that I've seen
    > obligate you for a specific time period--not number of days.
     
  13. Dorothy,
    I've offered to make up my Holiday time on Christmas, but the principal
    always turns me down. :shrug: If I had access to the building, I could
    work on Christmas. I wouldn't be paid for it.

    Magi

    toto wrote:
    > Then why does my son get paid extra when he does work on a holiday?
    > And people in other professions *do* work on Christmas or other
    > holidays, btw. In fact, teachers do work on that break too though
    > maybe not every day. Most teachers take home papers to grade
    > even over the winter and spring breaks.
     
  14. CBI wrote:
    > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >
    >>As a doctor, you also get paid a hell of a lot more than I do.

    >
    >
    > How is that relevant to whether you call spring break a paid vacation or
    > not?

    Its very relevant. Doctors really DO get paid vacations. I'm not
    saying they don't work hard... or that they have better schedules than
    teachers, because I know they don't. But there is a huge difference
    that is made up by more money!
    >
    >>You also don't spend your salary on toilet paper, soap, and office
    >>supplies.

    >
    >
    > Now THAT is a legitimate gripe!
    >

    Well, gee, thanks for allowing me that one.

    >
    >
    >>And while you may work more hours (probably more VARIED hours), I can
    >>still never manage to reach a doctor when I need one, nor can I get an
    >>appointment with a general physician without begging. It took me more
    >>than 6 months to get an appointment with a general physician where I
    >>live, despite two medical schools in the city, AND more than 8
    >>hospitals. I finally had to give it up, and now I drive 20 miles one
    >>way to the general physican I was finally able to get an appointment
    >>with. Last year, I had pneumonia and couldn't get an appointment: I
    >>wound up going to a "walk-in clinic".

    >
    >
    > I think all of that is horrible but it really is irrelevant to the
    > discussion at hand.
    >
    > If you are int he US (which it doesn;t sound like you are) you should change
    > docs.


    I am in the United States. I am in a metropolitan area, with, as I
    said, 2 major medical schools. One of them is one of the top medical
    schools in the country. There are more than 8 hospitals in a 20 miles
    radius (and a minimum of 8 in a 5 mile radius!). I *WORK* for one of
    them, and still couldn't get an appointment with a general physician
    when I was sick. I live walking distance from one major hospital, the
    one that my physician is with, yet to go see her, I must drive 20 miles.
    She's at both locations, but I can never get an appointment to see her
    at the closer one.

    Magi
     
  15. Yes, because we're paid for X number of days, and when you add days to
    the contract, we're not paid for them!

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >
    >>Ever noticed what happens when a district tries to add days to a
    >>teacher's work year?

    >
    >
    > Yeah, the teachers object.
    >
    >
     
  16. CBI wrote:
    > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >
    >>But I work more than 8 hours a day. I'm only PAID for 7.5 of the hours
    >>I work though.

    >
    >
    > If that is how your contract is worded then that is a legitimate gripe. My
    > impression is that mosyt teacher's contracts are not worded to include how
    > many hours they are to work (there may be a clause about minimum times to be
    > on campus but not how many hours to work).

    My contract says that I must be on campus from 7:30 to 3:30, M-F. I'm
    actually on campus from 6:30 to 4:00. I wouldn't have to take as much
    work home if I had the software I use to create some materials on my
    computers at school, but I don't.

    >
    >
    >
    >>>I don't know anyone who would consider an 8 hour day "crunch time". It

    >>

    > is
    >
    >>>the norm.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Uhm, yea... but the norm is also that people have flexibility in that
    >>time. They don't need to BEG for time off to take care of an emergency.

    >
    >
    > That is also not at all uncommon. I hear that complaint all the time.


    Funny. I've worked retail, food service, fast-food, engineering, temp,
    and journalism. I've NEVER had to beg off for an emergency AND had to
    arrange coverage for my position.

    Magi
     
  17. Said JZAH <[email protected]> :

    >I didn't say yours was either. I was referring to Alberto's posts.
    >I'm only wishing for a discussion, rather than an attack. I don't
    >think it's an impossible dream, however improbable it may be. The
    >entire Arab world or the Muslim faith should not be the subject of
    >whatever someone writes in reply when neither the entire Arab world or
    >the Muslim faith have anything at all o do with the thread.
    >Otherwise, the poster is attacking millions of diverse peoples and
    >calling into question my right to comment on whatever it is.


    Alberto couldn't care less what faith you belong to - to him, your
    faith's no better than anyone else's. Alberto attacks ATTITUDE,
    specially the attitude issues that result from some posts he has read.


    Furthermore, Alberto firmly believes in separating religion from a lot
    of things, not just only politics. So, the moment you separate
    yourself because of your religion, you may be attracting Alberto's
    objections - and he doesn't care if you're part of Islam, or Jewish,
    or Protestant, or even Catholic as Alberto is.

    Point being: to Alberto, the word "Zionist" draws from him the same
    reaction the world "Hitler" does: he invokes Godwyn's law.

    Want to debate with Alberto ? If so, you can start by stop hiding
    behind your religion or your ethnicity. The things that Alberto cares
    for far transcend religion or ethnicity, so, hide behind either at
    your own risk. I couldn't care less if you're an Arab, or if you're a
    Moslem, in fact, I don't give a jota about your faith. But I do care
    when I see faith interfering with common sense, and again, I'll point
    those out whenever I see them - and I don't care which religion I'm
    talking about.


    Alberto.
     
  18. I actually have a decent insurance plan. One of the benefits of working
    for a hospital: my insurance plan is way better here and cheaper than
    anything I've ever had before. The problem is getting established as a
    "new patient". Most doctors only see new patients on certain days, some
    only a couple of times a month. It is very hard to get a new general
    physician... and I need one that is willing to work with a specialist
    as well.

    Magi

    toto wrote:
    > On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 01:44:55 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>If you are int he US (which it doesn;t sound like you are) you should change
    >>docs.

    >
    >
    > Oh, she is in the US all right, CBI.
    >
    > How is she to find a new doc who is any better than the ones she
    > tried? Especially since she is probably limited by whatever health
    > insurance the district does give her. Not every doctor takes the
    > insurance and many people are limited to particular HMOs nowadays.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Dorothy
    >
    > There is no sound, no cry in all the world
    > that can be heard unless someone listens ..
    >
    > The Outer Limits
     
  19. Not for a new patient. This isn't the first time this has happened,
    either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    not wiling to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just flat
    out silly.

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > "toto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 01:44:55 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>If you are int he US (which it doesn;t sound like you are) you should

    >>

    > change
    >
    >>>docs.

    >>
    >>Oh, she is in the US all right, CBI.
    >>
    >>How is she to find a new doc who is any better than the ones she
    >>tried? Especially since she is probably limited by whatever health
    >>insurance the district does give her. Not every doctor takes the
    >>insurance and many people are limited to particular HMOs nowadays.

    >
    >
    > The average "next appointment time" in the US is 9 days. Having to wait 6
    > mos is pretty crappy. Sounds like something that needs to be renegotiated.
    >
    > --
    > CBI
    >
    >
     
  20. You're just full of assumptions, aren't you? My mom works for the
    federal government and she works on Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years,
    Easter Sunday, Memorial DAy, Labor Day, etc.
    The only time she doesn't work one of those days is if it is her
    scheduled day off.

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > "Seveigny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >> The idea that someone becomes a teacher because they want to have
    >>lots of vacation time is ridiculous.

    >
    >
    > I never said they did.
    >
    >
    >>If you want to have lots of vacation
    >>time, go to work for a corporation and stay there for awhile.

    >
    >
    > I would suggest working for the Federal government.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
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