Do I really have to wear a helmet while cycling in Victoria?



R

raisethe

Guest
I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
areas rather than in Melbourne?

Alternatively, do all cyclists obey this law, much like motorcyclists?
If so, then I suppose I will get one. Do you have any recommendations
for the cheapest and most unobtrusive helmet available?

Cheers
Ray
 
H

Halcyon

Guest
raisethe wrote:
> I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
> my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
> cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
> deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
> what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
> not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
> areas rather than in Melbourne?
>
> Alternatively, do all cyclists obey this law, much like motorcyclists?
> If so, then I suppose I will get one. Do you have any recommendations
> for the cheapest and most unobtrusive helmet available?
>
> Cheers
> Ray
>

Invariably all cyclists wear them, and for good reason.
You get what you pay for. Best to go for a light one with plenty of air
holes as heat can be an issue.
Halcyon
 
R

ray

Guest
raisethe wrote:
> I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
> my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
> cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
> deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
> what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
> not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
> areas rather than in Melbourne?
>
> Alternatively, do all cyclists obey this law, much like motorcyclists?
> If so, then I suppose I will get one. Do you have any recommendations
> for the cheapest and most unobtrusive helmet available?
>
> Cheers
> Ray
>


it's a common misconception that helmets protect you. In fact, thery're
more a last line of defence when you come off or are cleaned up by 1.5
tonnes of metal. People do ride here without helmets, but the only time
I do that is climbing a hill on a 40 degree day, which I think can be
reasonably excused.
Having been in two high speed bingles where the helmet unquestionably
did its job, which is to absorb impact that would otherwise be delivered
to your skull and brain, I'd certainly recommend you wear one except
possibly in extreme conditions as noted.
Cheers,
Another Ray
 

bkay

New Member
Jul 30, 2004
22
0
0
raisethe said:
I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
areas rather than in Melbourne?

Alternatively, do all cyclists obey this law, much like motorcyclists?
If so, then I suppose I will get one. Do you have any recommendations
for the cheapest and most unobtrusive helmet available?

Cheers
Ray
I live in mornington and cycle regularly with my husband who never wears a helmet. All the police have said to him is "a helmet would be nice".
 

cfsmtb

New Member
Apr 11, 2003
4,963
0
0
raisethe said:
I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
areas rather than in Melbourne?

You should wear a helmet. See here from VicRoads:
http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrne/vrne5nav.nsf/FirstChild/-0FFFDE1079575E47CA256FD300241C36

Also see Rules for Bikes and Skateboards in Victoria:
http://www.yarrabug.org/wp-content/RulesForBikesAndSkateboardsInVictoria.pdf

There's rules and there's personal choice, although we would both probably agree that arguing with police over points of law is not a universally recommended course of action.
 
A

Adam F

Guest
"cfsmtb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> raisethe Wrote:
>> I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
>> my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
>> cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
>> deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering
>> to
>> what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
>> not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
>> areas rather than in Melbourne?

>
> You should wear a helmet. See here from VicRoads:
> http://tinyurl.com/b384r
>
> Also see Rules for Bikes and Skateboards in Victoria:
> http://tinyurl.com/g7gwp
>
> There's rules and there's personal choice, although we would both
> probably agree that arguing with police over points of law is not a
> universally recommended course of action.
>
>
> --
> cfsmtb
>


OTOH, most cops here have a pretty laissez-faire attitude compared with your
typical bobby.
Generally no helmet will be classed as a FIDO offence (eff it, drive on)
because it's not going to harm anyone else.
Still, no guarantee you won't get fined if one's feeling a bit officious.


//Adam F
 
B

beerwolf

Guest
"raisethe" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too.
> On my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
> cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
> deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering
> to what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined
> for not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in
> country areas rather than in Melbourne?
>
> Alternatively, do all cyclists obey this law, much like motorcyclists?
> If so, then I suppose I will get one. Do you have any recommendations
> for the cheapest and most unobtrusive helmet available?
>
> Cheers
> Ray
>


Re the legal position: It is compulsory to wear an approved helmet while
cycling anywhere in Australia, on-road or off. However, I see plenty of
cyclists not wearing them - which would not be the case if there were a
zero tolerance enforcement policy. It *is* enforced though, in an
unpredictable way - probably depending on the individual police
officer's mood, opinions, instructions, etc. You could probably get away
with ignoring any fines, if you're not planning to come back. Be aware
though, that there have been a few instances where the police let down a
cyclist's tyres in addition to or instead of issuing a fine - and
confiscated the pump with instructions to pick it up from the cop shop
next day.

If you are planning to wear a helmet, you will regret buying a cheapie
if you're planning to ride a lot. They are all standards-compliant, but
vary a lot in amount of ventilation and therefore coolness. IMHO,
comfort is *everything*. FWIW, I switched to a Specialized Decibel and
wear it always when riding. I feel really exposed without it, and I find
that the ventilation it provides is excellent.

One other thing. Helmet or not, you WILL need head covering if riding
in Australia during summer. And a cloth between helmet and head unless
you have plenty of hair. I don't, and have acquired "tiger stripes" on
my scalp before wising up to this. AND don't forget covering for the
back of the neck.

Enjoy Australia!

--
beerwolf
(To reply by email, remove numbers from my address)
 
A

Aeek

Guest
On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 10:53:55 +1100, "Adam F"
<[email protected]?GOAWAYgmail.com> wrote:

>OTOH, most cops here have a pretty laissez-faire attitude compared with your
>typical bobby.
>Generally no helmet will be classed as a FIDO offence (eff it, drive on)
>because it's not going to harm anyone else.
>Still, no guarantee you won't get fined if one's feeling a bit officious.


Enforcement varies.
The West Australian Police have a reputation for letting the air out
of your tires and insisting that you walk.
 

geoffs

New Member
Sep 8, 2003
558
0
0
bkay said:
I live in mornington and cycle regularly with my husband who never wears a helmet. All the police have said to him is "a helmet would be nice".

If someone is to stupid to where a helmet, that's ok. Whatever it takes to improve the gene pool.

Cheers

Geoff
 
S

Shane Stanley

Guest
If you are taking out travel insurance, you're also running the risk of
invalidating it should you have an accident. In fact, some policies rule
out coverage if you're not wearing a helmet even in jurisdictions where
they aren't compulsory.

--
Shane Stanley
 
E

Euan

Guest
raisethe wrote:
> I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
> my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
> cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
> deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
> what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
> not wearing one? Is it more acceptable to ride helmetless in country
> areas rather than in Melbourne?


Helmet compulsion is enforced, albeit sporadically. In the metro areas
compliance is very high. In the suburbs, especially for youths,
compliance is not so high.

You will need to buy one in Australia as it has to be Australian
standards compliant. Even though you may buy exactly the same helmet in
the UK if it doesn't have that sticker it doesn't count. This is no big
deal if you're using the mighty Sterling ;-)

Spend the money and get a quality helmet. It gets hot in this country
and you want one with plenty of ventilation. The more comfortable the
helmet, the less likely you are to violate mandatory compulsion.

I assume you've been in helmet debates in UK forums, same contrasting
views here and same pointlessness in putting up facts against other
people's opinions. People will believe what they want to believe.
--
Cheers
Euan (Brit ex-pat)
 
D

Donga

Guest
Aeek wrote:

> Enforcement varies.
> The West Australian Police have a reputation for letting the air out
> of your tires and insisting that you walk.


Classic!
 

jur

New Member
Feb 2, 2005
244
0
0
There are also conflicting views as to whether a helmet makes your head hotter or not. Tests were inconclusive IIRC. In blazing sun I'd rather wear one. But one with plenty holes. You pay more for those.
 
E

Euan

Guest
jur wrote:
> There are also conflicting views as to whether a helmet makes your head
> hotter or not. Tests were inconclusive IIRC. In blazing sun I'd rather
> wear one. But one with plenty holes. You pay more for those.


I'd rather wear head wear designed specifically to protect me from the
sun, that rules out helmets. Unfortunately I don't have that choice.
--
Cheers
Euan
 
M

Michael Warner

Guest
On 18 Nov 2006 10:24:44 -0800, raisethe wrote:

> I cycle in the UK and don't wear a helmet because I do not want too. On
> my forthcoming cycle tour in Australia I understand it is a law for
> cyclists to wear them. Whilst I accept that it isn't a good idea to
> deliberately flout laws whilst in a foriegn country, I was wondering to
> what extent I am likely to be pulled over by the police and fined for
> not wearing one?


I'll let them know you're coming, and won't be wearing one. We can always
use another infusion of foreign funds from tourists.

--
Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
 

cfsmtb

New Member
Apr 11, 2003
4,963
0
0
Euan said:
I'd rather wear head wear designed specifically to protect me from the
sun, that rules out helmets. Unfortunately I don't have that choice.

There's always DIY options, not forgetting bicycle helmet covers, similar to Legionnaire caps. The only problem I have with these is that they tend to get sweaty when you're not moving, ie: no air circulating. When travelling in summer I usually have a spare foldup raffia/bucket hat to place on the noggin. ;)
 
V

Vincent A. Patrick

Guest
On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 11:31:02 +1100, Aeek wrote:

> On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 10:53:55 +1100, "Adam F"
> <[email protected]?GOAWAYgmail.com> wrote:
>
>>OTOH, most cops here have a pretty laissez-faire attitude compared with your
>>typical bobby.
>>Generally no helmet will be classed as a FIDO offence (eff it, drive on)
>>because it's not going to harm anyone else.
>>Still, no guarantee you won't get fined if one's feeling a bit officious.

>
> Enforcement varies.
> The West Australian Police have a reputation for letting the air out
> of your tires and insisting that you walk.


That'd be right. Never mind the pump on the bike.

Cheers,

Vince
 
B

beerwolf

Guest
cfsmtb <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

>
> Euan Wrote:
>>
>> I'd rather wear head wear designed specifically to protect me from
>> the sun, that rules out helmets. Unfortunately I don't have that
>> choice.
>>

>
> There's always DIY options, not forgetting bicycle helmet covers,
> similar to Legionnaire caps. The only problem I have with these is
> that they tend to get sweaty when you're not moving, ie: no air
> circulating. When travelling in summer I usually have a spare foldup
> raffia/bucket hat to place on the noggin. ;)


I use a white skullcap with a legionare-style neck flap, between helmet
and scalp. Obtained from the anti cancer shop. They come with an
attached eyeshade, which would be handy for a helmet that doesn't have
its own. I cut that off because it got in the way - and made swimming
awkward (I also use it while snorkelling, another easy route to a
sunburnt neck).

--
beerwolf
(To reply by email, remove numbers from my address)
 
E

Euan

Guest
cfsmtb wrote:
> Euan Wrote:
>> I'd rather wear head wear designed specifically to protect me from the
>> sun, that rules out helmets. Unfortunately I don't have that choice.
>>

>
> There's always DIY options, not forgetting bicycle helmet covers,
> similar to Legionnaire caps. The only problem I have with these is that
> they tend to get sweaty when you're not moving, ie: no air circulating.
> When travelling in summer I usually have a spare foldup raffia/bucket
> hat to place on the noggin. ;)


Yeah but it's much nicer wearing something that's designed to keep you
cool and protect you from the sun. Every helmet I've come across works
against that.
--
Cheers
Euan
 
R

raisethe

Guest
raisethe wrote:

Many thanks for the wide range of responses. I hadn't thought of the
sunburnt neck issue, although I have a sunhat from my last trip.

What exactly is a fold-up raffia bucket hat?

Without wishing to re-ignite the helmet debate, I would just point out
that I only cycle at 8 mph, hardly faster than a ped, so a fall at that
speed is unlikely to result in a head first landing.

Perhaps I'll risk it without one and see how it goes - I can always
play the dumb tourist if stopped by the police. Mind you, having
already been fleeced once having to buy an Aussie visa, I don't really
fancy giving your government any more bucks in the form of a fine!

(To avoid abusive replies, I would point out that I am more than happy
to spend plenty in your shops, motels, bars etc).
 

Similar threads