Pump - recommendations



M

Martin

Guest
Jay wrote:
> All,
>
> I'm looking to buy a new pump and would welcome any recommendations that
> people may have. Ideally something light that I can either fix to the
> bike, or carry in a rear pocket. I don't mind spending a bit more on
> quality kit so no need to consider budget.
>
> Any recommendations welcome,


I have had pumps fail on me on about three occasions, plus a brand new
pump fall off my bike within three hours (and over forty miles) of cycling.

I now carry two pumps, a CO2 cartridge pump, and a mini-pump. Either one
will get me to where I am going, or get me home.
 
A

Andy Morris

Guest
Dave Larrington wrote:
> Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell us:
>
>> Zefal HPX is the One True Pump

>
> Unless one has a Several of bicycles with widely differing seat tube
> lengths, in which case it may end up being Four True Pumps, with all the
> extra expense that this entails.
>


One bike One pump is the only way to avoid being up fairy lane with no pump.

--
Andy Morris

AndyAtjinkasDotfreeserve.co.uk
 
M

Martin

Guest
Andy Morris wrote:
> Dave Larrington wrote:
>> Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to
>> tell us:
>>
>>> Zefal HPX is the One True Pump

>>
>> Unless one has a Several of bicycles with widely differing seat tube
>> lengths, in which case it may end up being Four True Pumps, with all
>> the extra expense that this entails.
>>

>
> One bike One pump is the only way to avoid being up fairy lane with no
> pump.


Good idea.

I use the opposite approach. One man, one tool kit. My tool kit (pumps,
tubes etc.) all stay together, and goes with me whenever I get on a bike.
 
N

Nick

Guest
Squashme wrote:
> On 17 Jun, 18:50, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
>> All,
>>
>> I'm looking to buy a new pump and would welcome any recommendations that
>> people may have. Ideally something light that I can either fix to the
>> bike, or carry in a rear pocket. I don't mind spending a bit more on
>> quality kit so no need to consider budget.
>>
>> Any recommendations welcome,
>>
>> Thanks,....Jason

>
> I wouldn't suggest that this would work for everyone, probably not you
> indeed, but you could just steal mine. Many people have over the
> years. Might like a lamp while you're about it.


I normally leave my pump on my bike and I haven't had one nicked, even
though the bike is often parked in a public street all day.

I did once accidentally catch someone borrowing my pump which he had
taken off my parked bike, I asked if he needed help, and then left him
to it. He did replace the pump afterwards.
 
M

Martin

Guest
Nick wrote:

> I did once accidentally catch someone borrowing my pump which he had
> taken off my parked bike, I asked if he needed help, and then left him
> to it. He did replace the pump afterwards.


I have borrowed pumps off other peoples bikes, but always replaced them.
(only a couple of times).
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 11:31:19 +0100
"Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Unless one has a Several of bicycles with widely differing seat tube
> lengths, in which case it may end up being Four True Pumps, with all
> the extra expense that this entails.
>

Get a pump to fit the smallest frame (under the top tube for a bit
more length) then fit pump pegs to the other frames?
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In news:[email protected],
Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell us:

> I am puzzled by the hon. gentleman's interjection, as the Brompton
> (did I mention I have a Brompton)


Good heavens! When did that happen?

> comes with a nifty Zefal pump
> already fitted.


Very nice, I'm sure. However, suppose one's towpath bike has a 16" frame,
one's touring bike has a 25½" frame and one's fakenger bike is somewhere in
between, then that would require three separate pumps. I contend that this
is a waste of money, natural resources and vintage port.

--
Dave Larrington
<http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk>
A *National* Socialist Government did you say, Mr. Chaplin?
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In news:[email protected]d.motzarella.org,
Andy Morris <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell us:

> One bike One pump is the only way to avoid being up fairy lane with
> no pump.


I don't think I've ever been caught without one (except when the business
end of one went AWOL 2/3 of the way through a particularly flint-strewn
Rural South 300), and 6/7 of the fleet has a fitting to carry a Road Morph
(the remaining 1/7 is only for race use, so doesn't need to carry
/anything/).

--
Dave Larrington
<http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk>
Pepperoni and green peppers, mushrooms, olives, chives!
 
B

bugbear

Guest
Andrew Price wrote:
> On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 10:52:26 +0100, bugbear
> <[email protected]_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
>
>>> I have yet to find a pump that is small enough to carry on the bike
>>> (this includes the big chunky frame pumps) that will actually get a road
>>> bike tire anywhere near 100psi in under 30min of hard work, let alone
>>> the 120psi that I normally ride.

>> You've never encountered a Zefal HPX then

>
> <http://www.sks-germany.com/sks.php?l=de&a=product&i=1371259900&PHPSESSID=9748f0da2acc1f90cb9d00c50618a31e>
>
> Or an SKS "Wese"


I'm not sure a name quite so like "wheeze"
is slick marketing!

BugBear
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Dave Larrington wrote:
> In news:[email protected],
> Rob Morley <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell
> us:
>> On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 11:31:19 +0100
>> "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Unless one has a Several of bicycles with widely differing seat tube
>>> lengths, in which case it may end up being Four True Pumps, with all
>>> the extra expense that this entails.
>>>

>> Get a pump to fit the smallest frame (under the top tube for a bit
>> more length) then fit pump pegs to the other frames?

>
> Fail. While I /have/ tried this, the under-top-tube mounting was
> never secure enough to hold the pump in place without the additional
> support of a couple of toe straps.


I have tried it (on a normal road bike), too. It failed with a plasic peg
that I couldn't get tight enough. It worked fine with an old metal clip-on
peg that was very rigid and very tight; no straps required.

~PB
 
P

POHB

Guest
On 18 Jun, 22:00, Andy Morris <[email protected]> wrote:
> One bike One pump is the only way to avoid being up fairy lane with no pump.


Or fit Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres and never have punctures
 
R

Roger Merriman

Guest
POHB <[email protected]> wrote:

> On 18 Jun, 22:00, Andy Morris <[email protected]> wrote:
> > One bike One pump is the only way to avoid being up fairy lane with no pump.

>
> Or fit Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres and never have punctures


that is my choice at least for my work bike, it does have various pumps
and what not in the paniers as the weight is hardly a issue with that
bike.

roger
--
www.rogermerriman.com
 
A

Alan Braggins

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Dave Larrington wrote:
>In news:[email protected],
>Rob Morley <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell us:
>> On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 11:31:19 +0100
>> "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Unless one has a Several of bicycles with widely differing seat tube
>>> lengths, in which case it may end up being Four True Pumps, with all
>>> the extra expense that this entails.
>>>

>> Get a pump to fit the smallest frame (under the top tube for a bit
>> more length) then fit pump pegs to the other frames?

>
>Fail. While I /have/ tried this, the under-top-tube mounting was never
>secure enough to hold the pump in place without the additional support of a
>couple of toe straps.


I have a small lock held on the top-tube with a hose clip (with the bit
with the screwdriver slot hidden by the lock when it's done up), which
holds the pump on securely. Sadly, LBS that sold it hadn't seen one for
years when I asked about buying another for a different bike.

Though part of the point is to make it easier to leave the pump on the
bike all the time, so it doesn't really help with the Several of bikes
(probably easier to undo than a couple of toeclips though). And it does
mean that if you get a puncture when you have forgotten your keys, you
are buggered (hasn't happened yet, but no doubt it will one day).
(In my case, the bike came with a pump, and years later when that cracked
it now has a cheap non-HPX Zefal, because that was what LBS had in stock
(and it's adequate for emergency use, similar to the original pump).)
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 08:52:19 +0100, "Dave Larrington"
<[email protected]> said in
<[email protected]>:

>I contend that this
>is a waste of money, natural resources and vintage port.


Have some madeira, m'dear.

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
 
A

Andrew Price

Guest
On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 09:29:57 +0100, bugbear
<[email protected]_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:

>> Or an SKS "Wese"

>
>I'm not sure a name quite so like "wheeze"
>is slick marketing!


It's German, so it isn't pronounced that way at all. Comes from
Steffen Wesemann

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steffen_Wesemann>

which is a name familiar to some cyclists.
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 19:29:13 +1000
jcjordan <[email protected]> wrote:

> I have yet to find a pump that is small enough to carry on the bike
> (this includes the big chunky frame pumps) that will actually get a
> road bike tire anywhere near 100psi in under 30min of hard work, let
> alone the 120psi that I normally ride.
>
> Half inflated tires just ruin the ride and are just likely to puncture
> again. I would rather blow the AUS$2 on a CO2 canister and be going
> again within 5 min.
>
>

I can get 80PSI into a 700x28C tyre in about 3 minutes using an
ordinary cheap plastic Zefal frame pump, and that's plenty to be going
on with - I'm pretty sure an HPX would top 100PSI and not take much
longer to do it.
 
B

bugbear

Guest
Andrew Price wrote:
> On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 09:29:57 +0100, bugbear
> <[email protected]_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
>
>>> Or an SKS "Wese"

>> I'm not sure a name quite so like "wheeze"
>> is slick marketing!

>
> It's German, so it isn't pronounced that way at all.


But what if a 'umble Brit doesn't know that ;-)

BugBear
 
A

Andrew Price

Guest
On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 10:01:23 +0100, bugbear
<[email protected]_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:

>>>> Or an SKS "Wese"
>>> I'm not sure a name quite so like "wheeze"
>>> is slick marketing!

>>
>> It's German, so it isn't pronounced that way at all.

>
>But what if a 'umble Brit doesn't know that ;-)


You have a point there. In fact, I believe that some marketing
consultants do in fact cross-check with other major languages, to
ensure that a new product name doesn't sound silly...or worse. I
guess hand pumps for road bikes is such a tiny niche market that it
wasn't considered necessary.
 
A

Alan Braggins

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Andrew Price wrote:
>
>You have a point there. In fact, I believe that some marketing
>consultants do in fact cross-check with other major languages, to
>ensure that a new product name doesn't sound silly...or worse.


Allegedly Rolls Royce planned to call the Silver Shadow the Silver Mist
until someone pointed out that Mist means **** in German.

But some widespread stories turn out not to be true:
http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/nova.asp
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Nova#The_urban_legend

On the other hand:
http://chameleon-translations.com/Index-Companies-pajero.shtml