What Makes You A Cyclist?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Thecyclist2002, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. Some people say that if you don't finish a century, you're
    not a cyclist.

    Some people say that if you don't shave your legs, you're
    not a cyclist.

    Some people say that if you ride a 'discount store' bike,
    you're not a cyclist.

    Some people say that if you wear sweatpants and a t-shirt or
    sweatshirt, you're not a cyclist.

    Some people say if you don't ride year round, you're not
    a cyclist.

    Well, to all of that, I say BULLS**T!! Those who think along
    those lines, are in my opinion, cycling snobs. If you can
    pedal a bike, you're a cyclist.

    Okay, maybe you're not an "elite" cyclist in the caliber of
    Lance Armstrong, but you're a cyclist nonetheless. It
    doesn't matter if you pedal across town, across your state,
    or even across the country; you're a cyclist.

    If you have a desire to ride, no matter what type of bike it
    is, you're a cyclist. If you look forward to climbing on
    your bike and hitting the road, bike path, or trail, you're
    a cyclist.

    It doesn't matter if you're underweight, right at your goal
    weight, or a few pounds (or more) overweight, if you love to
    ride, you're a cyclist.

    To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear, what
    type of bike you ride, or even how many seasons you ride in.
    No, none of that matters. What make you a cyclist is the
    love of the ride!!

    AJC

    "Let's Ride!!"
     
    Tags:


  2. .O0 0o.

    .O0 0o. Guest

    I used to race. When I was in high school. I know the
    cycling snob. I was on the verge of becoming one.

    > Some people say that if you don't finish a century, you're
    > not a cyclist.
    I've done many

    > Some people say that if you don't shave your legs, you're
    > not a cyclist.
    I don't race but I still shave my legs. It just feels
    natural to me now.

    > Some people say that if you ride a 'discount store' bike,
    > you're not a
    cyclist. OK, I had a Trek 1400 that I bought in 1992. I
    never upgraded it to STI and when I started riding again it
    would have cost more to upgrade than to get my Mongoose
    Morzine from Dick's Sporting Goods. $400 bucks seemed like a
    good deal.

    > Some people say that if you wear sweatpants and a t-shirt
    > or sweatshirt,
    you're
    > not a cyclist.
    I just dont like the bulky clothes.

    > Some people say if you don't ride year round, you're not a
    > cyclist.
    I ride all year, but MUCH more when it is warm

    > Well, to all of that, I say BULLS**T!! Those who think
    > along those lines,
    are
    > in my opinion, cycling snobs. If you can pedal a bike,
    > you're a cyclist.
    I agree.
     
  3. W K

    W K Guest

  4. Rocketman

    Rocketman Guest

    "TheCyclist2002" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Some people say that if you don't finish a century, you're
    > not a cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say that if you don't shave your legs, you're
    > not a cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say that if you ride a 'discount store' bike,
    > you're not a
    cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say that if you wear sweatpants and a t-shirt
    > or sweatshirt,
    you're
    > not a cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say if you don't ride year round, you're not a
    > cyclist.
    >
    > Well, to all of that, I say BULLS**T!! Those who think
    > along those lines,
    are
    > in my opinion, cycling snobs. If you can pedal a bike,
    > you're a cyclist.

    Agreed.

    > Okay, maybe you're not an "elite" cyclist in the caliber
    > of Lance
    Armstrong,
    > but you're a cyclist nonetheless. It doesn't matter if you
    > pedal across
    town,
    > across your state, or even across the country; you're a
    > cyclist.

    Yes.

    > If you have a desire to ride, no matter what type of bike
    > it is, you're a cyclist. If you look forward to climbing
    > on your bike and hitting the
    road,
    > bike path, or trail, you're a cyclist.
    >
    > It doesn't matter if you're underweight, right at your
    > goal weight, or a
    few
    > pounds (or more) overweight, if you love to ride, you're a
    > cyclist.
    >
    > To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear,
    > what type of bike
    you
    > ride, or even how many seasons you ride in. No, none of
    > that matters. What
    make
    > you a cyclist is the love of the ride!!

    Even the folks riding because of a DUI are cyclists. They
    may not really enjoy cycling (they ride because they don't
    have a driver's license) but they're cyclists nonetheless.

    Get the word out: Ride what you have. Just ride.

    Rocketman
     
  5. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    TheCyclist2002 wrote:

    > If you can pedal a bike, you're a cyclist.

    Ah, but only if you *DO* pedal said bike.

    Bill "can paddle, but ain't no canoeist" S.
     
  6. "TheCyclist2002" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message ..

    >
    > To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear,
    > what type of bike you ride, or even how many seasons you
    > ride in. No, none of that matters. What make you a cyclist
    > is the love of the ride!!

    Look, normaly I'm a really nice guy, but you brought this on
    yourself. You are what is known as a FRED. You will have
    lot's of other FREDS to ride with as the roads are clogged
    with these types.

    Just don't expect any respect from me. I don't like the
    why you look, what you ride, who you hang out with,
    what you wear.

    If we pass on the road don't try to wave or smile at me, I'm
    going to have to ignore you.

    That's the way road riding is and always has been.

    Real Roadies don't like FREDS.
     
  7. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "TheCyclist2002" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Some people say that if you don't finish a century, you're
    > not a cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say that if you don't shave your legs, you're
    > not a cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say that if you ride a 'discount store' bike,
    > you're not a
    cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say that if you wear sweatpants and a t-shirt
    > or sweatshirt,
    you're
    > not a cyclist.
    >
    > Some people say if you don't ride year round, you're not a
    > cyclist.
    >
    > Well, to all of that, I say BULLS**T!! Those who think
    > along those lines,
    are
    > in my opinion, cycling snobs. If you can pedal a bike,
    > you're a cyclist.
    >
    > Okay, maybe you're not an "elite" cyclist in the caliber
    > of Lance
    Armstrong,
    > but you're a cyclist nonetheless. It doesn't matter if you
    > pedal across
    town,
    > across your state, or even across the country; you're a
    > cyclist.
    >
    > If you have a desire to ride, no matter what type of bike
    > it is, you're a cyclist. If you look forward to climbing
    > on your bike and hitting the
    road,
    > bike path, or trail, you're a cyclist.
    >
    > It doesn't matter if you're underweight, right at your
    > goal weight, or a
    few
    > pounds (or more) overweight, if you love to ride, you're a
    > cyclist.
    >
    > To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear,
    > what type of bike
    you
    > ride, or even how many seasons you ride in. No, none of
    > that matters. What
    make
    > you a cyclist is the love of the ride!!
    >
    > AJC
    >
    > "Let's Ride!!"

    Hmmmm...I guess it depends on your definition of "cyclist".
    If you go with the dictionary definition, "a person who
    rides a bicycle", then everyone who turns a crank is a
    "cyclist". This includes 6-year old girls with training
    wheels and flowered baskets, as well as the half-drunk guy
    riding home from the liquor store at night, with no helmet,
    on the wrong side of the road, with a cigarette in his mouth
    and a 12-pack balanced on the top tube.

    However, most of us have a somewhat more restrictive
    definition of "cyclist". My own definition is, "one who is
    passionate about cycling, and spends a considerable amount
    of time thinking about it and doing it". This definition
    would exclude the little girls, the DUI guys, impoverished
    students who only ride because they don't have a car, etc.
    Most (but not all) people who meet this more restrictive
    definition will not be seen riding a WallyWorld bike in
    sweatpants, because those tools are generally inadequate for
    the job. However, many will have unshaven legs, based on
    what I see on tours and centuries.

    --
    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.CycliStats.com CycliStats -
    Software for Cyclists
     
  8. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke Guest

    "Rocketman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pYk5c.16606

    > Even the folks riding because of a DUI are cyclists. They
    > may not really enjoy cycling (they ride because they don't
    > have a driver's license) but they're cyclists nonetheless.

    A DUI can actually be a blessing in disguise. When I got
    mine I rode more, walked more and found that most bartenders
    can be quite accommodating about letting you bring your bike
    into the bar. :cool:

    Dave
     
  9. Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:

    > "TheCyclist2002" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message ..
    >
    >
    >>To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear,
    >>what type of bike you ride, or even how many seasons you
    >>ride in. No, none of that matters. What make you a cyclist
    >>is the love of the ride!!
    >
    >
    > Look, normaly I'm a really nice guy, but you brought this
    > on yourself. You are what is known as a FRED. You will
    > have lot's of other FREDS to ride with as the roads are
    > clogged with these types.
    >
    > Just don't expect any respect from me. I don't like the
    > why you look, what you ride, who you hang out with, what
    > you wear.
    >
    > If we pass on the road don't try to wave or smile at me,
    > I'm going to have to ignore you.
    >
    > That's the way road riding is and always has been.
    >
    > Real Roadies don't like FREDS.

    There you have it Cyclist2002, from the mouth of Mr. Style!
    Enjoyment of the ride is nice, but you must look good above
    all else to be a true "cyclist".

    I have worked very hard at improving my appearance on my
    road bike. I've added spiral black and red cork tape to my
    black, white, silver and red Trek 2000. Red rims with black
    tires but may upgrade to tires with red or silver stripes in
    the tread, solely in the name of style.

    I no longer wear white socks under my Teva sandals when
    there is any possibility of being seen in public (reserved
    for back roads tens of miles from anywhere in western
    Montana while touring only), and even taken to wearing some
    very stylish shades [which almost no one would note are
    actually $7 hardware store safety glasses, hee hee!].

    My bell has been "stealthified" behind the handlebar stem
    and I've mounted the absolute lightest duty rack in the
    back, and not loaded it down with panniers or other
    disruptions to air flow.

    All in an effort to get just a nod from "The Man from Style"
    in passing on the road. No smile required. Certainly no arm
    wave. Just a look of non-distaste showing a minuscule of
    appreciation of my efforts to de-Fredify. Sigh. No luck.

    So I simply must tell you, it's time to upgrade your kit if
    you want to be a "cyclist"! Otherwise, just spin on the
    rollers down in the basement where no one will see you, and
    you can pretend.

    SMH
     
  10. I have a bicycle.

    what's your excuse?

    -Luigi
     
  11. Raoul Duke <[email protected]> wrote:
    > A DUI can actually be a blessing in disguise. When I got
    > mine I rode more, walked more and found that most
    > bartenders can be quite accommodating about letting you
    > bring your bike into the bar. :cool:

    heh, no DUI (i didn't even own a car until i was 27) but in
    my early/mid twenties we used to do what we-called the Tour
    de Nordeast (of northeast minneapolis bars) and yea, you're
    right, a lot of the bartendars were quite accomodating if it
    wasn't too busy.

    http://www.phototour.minneapolis.mn.us/894
    http://www.mayslacks.com/ the polish palace (sniffle)
    stasius ne yacht club elsie's bar and bowling center tony
    jaro's (erggh, greenies)

    next morning!

    http://www.phototour.minneapolis.mn.us/897
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  12. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    >
    > > "TheCyclist2002" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message ..
    > >
    > >
    > >>To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear,
    > >>what type of bike
    you
    > >>ride, or even how many seasons you ride in. No, none of
    > >>that matters.
    What make
    > >>you a cyclist is the love of the ride!!
    > >
    > >
    > > Look, normaly I'm a really nice guy, but you brought
    > > this on yourself. You are what is known as a FRED. You
    > > will have lot's of other FREDS to ride with as the roads
    > > are clogged with these types.
    > >
    > > Just don't expect any respect from me. I don't like the
    > > why you look, what you ride, who you hang out with, what
    > > you wear.
    > >
    > > If we pass on the road don't try to wave or smile at me,
    > > I'm going to have to ignore you.
    > >
    > > That's the way road riding is and always has been.
    > >
    > > Real Roadies don't like FREDS.
    >
    > There you have it Cyclist2002, from the mouth of Mr.
    > Style! Enjoyment of the ride is nice, but you must look
    > good above all else to be a true "cyclist".
    >
    > I have worked very hard at improving my appearance on my
    > road bike. I've added spiral black and red cork tape to my
    > black, white, silver and red Trek 2000. Red rims with
    > black tires but may upgrade to tires with red or silver
    > stripes in the tread, solely in the name of style.
    >
    > I no longer wear white socks under my Teva sandals when
    > there is any possibility of being seen in public (reserved
    > for back roads tens of miles from anywhere in western
    > Montana while touring only), and even taken to wearing
    > some very stylish shades [which almost no one would note
    > are actually $7 hardware store safety glasses, hee hee!].
    >
    > My bell has been "stealthified" behind the handlebar stem
    > and I've mounted the absolute lightest duty rack in the
    > back, and not loaded it down with panniers or other
    > disruptions to air flow.
    >
    > All in an effort to get just a nod from "The Man from
    > Style" in passing on the road. No smile required.
    > Certainly no arm wave. Just a look of non-distaste showing
    > a minuscule of appreciation of my efforts to de-Fredify.
    > Sigh. No luck.
    >
    > So I simply must tell you, it's time to upgrade your kit
    > if you want to be a "cyclist"! Otherwise, just spin on the
    > rollers down in the basement where no one will see you,
    > and you can pretend.
    >
    >
    > SMH
    >
    >

    Perhaps if your rack supports were made from titanium, and
    the top were carbon fiber...

    FWIW, I ride a Trek 5200 and always try to at least nod or
    smile at other cyclists. There's not that many of us on the
    rural back roads where I ride, and no sense in being a snob.

    --
    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.CycliStats.com CycliStats -
    Software for Cyclists
     
  13. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

  14. Flabby,

    No one wants to hear from pathetic convicts like you
    watching your reflection in the ReMax mirrored window pane,
    playing with "Willie" in clear sight of children.

    Didn't you learn a lesson from being locked up and convicted
    last season?

    Your buddy.

    Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:

    > "TheCyclist2002" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message ..
    >
    > >
    > > To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear,
    > > what type of bike you ride, or even how many seasons you
    > > ride in. No, none of that matters. What make you a
    > > cyclist is the love of the ride!!
    >
    > Look, normaly I'm a really nice guy, but you brought this
    > on yourself. You are what is known as a FRED. You will
    > have lot's of other FREDS to ride with as the roads are
    > clogged with these types.
    >
    > Just don't expect any respect from me. I don't like the
    > why you look, what you ride, who you hang out with, what
    > you wear.
    >
    > If we pass on the road don't try to wave or smile at me,
    > I'm going to have to ignore you.
    >
    > That's the way road riding is and always has been.
    >
    > Real Roadies don't like FREDS.
     
  15. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 15:46:15 -0500, Stephen Harding <[email protected]> from
    Computer Science Dept UMass Amherst wrote:

    >
    >There you have it Cyclist2002, from the mouth of Mr. Style!
    >Enjoyment of the ride is nice, but you must look good above
    >all else to be a true "cyclist".

    Well, yeah .... where's the problem ?

    --
    [email protected]
    Lost in useless territory.
    24
     
  16. Mp

    Mp Guest

    On 15 Mar 2004 13:52:59 GMT, [email protected] (TheCyclist2002)
    wrote:

    (snip)
    >To me, it isn't about how far you ride, what you wear, what
    >type of bike you ride, or even how many seasons you ride
    >in. No, none of that matters. What make you a cyclist is
    >the love of the ride!!

    When I first joined a cycling club, about 13 years ago, I
    rather naively showed up on a flat barred hybrid. I got some
    odd looks, but this was a recreational club, I had no
    trouble maintaining a 15-17 mph pace on 20 to 40 mile rides,
    and I was quickly accepted. I do remember one or two slower
    riders on road bikes who seemed to resent it when I passed
    them, but that was rare.

    Still, from observing others, I caught on that a road bike
    really was much better for road riding, and I eventually
    bought one. I tried lycra shorts, and found that they were
    more comfortable. Went from sneakers and toe clips to
    clipless (SPD). Still don't shave my legs, and am more
    likely to wear a T shirt than a jersey, though I do own
    some. I still look like a Fred to the racing wannabes, but
    most of the ones I meet are polite enough. And now that I
    think of it, "wannabes" is too unkind. Many really do race,
    and many who don't are still a lot faster than me.

    Yes, you're a cyclist if you cycle, but it turns out there
    really are good reasons, not just snobbery, for many of the
    things that "serious" cyclists do.

    MP
     
  17. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    Do you ride in the Minneapolis CM? I rode in Apr 2002 the
    month after the improperly impounded bicycles.

    David Reuteler wrote:
    >
    <snip>
    >
    > heh, no DUI (i didn't even own a car until i was 27) but
    > in my early/mid twenties we used to do what we-called the
    > Tour de Nordeast (of northeast minneapolis bars) and yea,
    > you're right, a lot of the bartendars were quite
    > accomodating if it wasn't too busy.
    >
    > http://www.phototour.minneapolis.mn.us/894
    <snip>
    > http://www.phototour.minneapolis.mn.us/897
    > --
    > david reuteler [email protected]
     
  18. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    TheCyclist2002 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Some people say that if you don't finish a century, you're
    >not a cyclist.
    >
    >Some people say that if you don't shave your legs, you're
    >not a cyclist.
    >
    >Some people say that if you ride a 'discount store' bike,
    >you're not a cyclist.
    >
    >Some people say that if you wear sweatpants and a t-shirt
    >or sweatshirt, you're not a cyclist.
    .....

    Well, acording to most of what you say, I'm a cyclist (I
    don't shave, though). However, I don't consider myself to be
    a cyclist. I just like riding a bike.

    -Pete
    --

    "It's a sad day for american capitalism when a man can't
    fly a midget on a kite over Central Park."
    J. Moran
     
  19. Methuselah

    Methuselah Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 18:32:44 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If we pass on the road don't try to wave or smile at me,
    >I'm going to have to ignore you.

    Hmph. Thanks for letting a new cyclist know what they are in
    for. I have seen this in other areas, also. Equestrians are
    pretty bad about it, and there is the "Sail" versus
    "Stinkpot" true believers at marinas, etc. etc.

    I enjoyed cycling this weekend, even though it was a bit
    cold. I wasn't really cycling of course, because I was not
    in _costume_. I was wearing _shoes_ and _jeans_ and a
    leather jacket. Bet that has caused an apoplectic aesthetic
    crisis! Well, whatever it was I was doing, I enjoyed it and
    felt good afterward. Good enough to return to many other
    interests. It's cycling. If someone wants to make it a
    religion, that's their right. They can even condemn
    heretics, for all I care.

    I am going to ride in a loose flannel shirt, or nothing at
    all, if I feel like it. One thing I am not going to ride in
    is a pack of judgemental assholes.
     
  20. Banditmandan

    Banditmandan Guest

    "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Look, normaly I'm a really nice guy, but you brought this
    > on yourself. You are what is known as a FRED. You will
    > have lot's of other FREDS to ride with as the roads are
    > clogged with these types.
    >
    > Just don't expect any respect from me. I don't like the
    > why you look, what you ride, who you hang out with, what
    > you wear.
    >
    > If we pass on the road don't try to wave or smile at me,
    > I'm going to have to ignore you.
    >
    > That's the way road riding is and always has been.
    >
    > Real Roadies don't like FREDS.
    >

    I may be considered a "FRED" but I don't really care because
    for me it's not about the looks or styling but it's ALL
    about seeing what I can achieve (distance & speed). I may
    not have the money to buy the latest titanium parts but
    generally speaking I don't need them when I come across
    cyclist snobs because they are mostly bark and no bite. Most
    cycling snobs are dressed really well and have the nicest
    bikes but I always think to myself how it's a shame to spend
    all that money to trim off a few grams off the bike when
    they really should be more concerned about trimming a few
    pounds off their bodies.

    But hey, if it makes you feel better to look down on those
    "FREDS" then go ahead. I'm still riding for the complete
    enjoyment and I certainly don't care if I have your respect.
    Just move aside when you see me coming up behind you. ;-)

    Dan.
     
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