Opinions on versatile bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fred Barney, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    > mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    > getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    > not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    > any bike.
    >
    > Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    > wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    > those tires on my track bike.
    >
    > Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    > cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    > is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    > those sound like the riding you are doing.


    How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    best choice.
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>, Fred
    Barney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David L. Johnson says...
    >
    >
    >
    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    I used to ride a Steelman Eurocross down a 1.1-mile stretch of
    indifferently maintained private gravel road that dropped 430-some feet;
    the steepest bit, about a quarter-mile, is probably 15 percent or
    thereabouts. Frankly, it's not much fun, even with 700x30 or 700x40
    rubber. Got a bit easier once I added top-mounted brake levers to give me
    a more upright position on the way down, but you still take a beating,
    especially on washboard.

    But if you're only doing that one ugly-ass half mile, a steel cyclo-cross
    bike is a good all-rounder. It doesn't do anything perfectly -- outside of
    racing cyclo-cross -- but it does pretty much everything acceptably.

    Cheers,

    Patrick O'Grady
    Mad Dog Media
    http://www.maddogmedia.com
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Fred
    Barney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David L. Johnson says...
    >
    >
    >
    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    I used to ride a Steelman Eurocross down a 1.1-mile stretch of
    indifferently maintained private gravel road that dropped 430-some feet;
    the steepest bit, about a quarter-mile, is probably 15 percent or
    thereabouts. Frankly, it's not much fun, even with 700x30 or 700x40
    rubber. Got a bit easier once I added top-mounted brake levers to give me
    a more upright position on the way down, but you still take a beating,
    especially on washboard.

    But if you're only doing that one ugly-ass half mile, a steel cyclo-cross
    bike is a good all-rounder. It doesn't do anything perfectly -- outside of
    racing cyclo-cross -- but it does pretty much everything acceptably.

    Cheers,

    Patrick O'Grady
    Mad Dog Media
    http://www.maddogmedia.com
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Fred
    Barney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David L. Johnson says...
    >
    >
    >
    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    I used to ride a Steelman Eurocross down a 1.1-mile stretch of
    indifferently maintained private gravel road that dropped 430-some feet;
    the steepest bit, about a quarter-mile, is probably 15 percent or
    thereabouts. Frankly, it's not much fun, even with 700x30 or 700x40
    rubber. Got a bit easier once I added top-mounted brake levers to give me
    a more upright position on the way down, but you still take a beating,
    especially on washboard.

    But if you're only doing that one ugly-ass half mile, a steel cyclo-cross
    bike is a good all-rounder. It doesn't do anything perfectly -- outside of
    racing cyclo-cross -- but it does pretty much everything acceptably.

    Cheers,

    Patrick O'Grady
    Mad Dog Media
    http://www.maddogmedia.com
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, Fred
    Barney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David L. Johnson says...
    >
    >
    >
    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    I used to ride a Steelman Eurocross down a 1.1-mile stretch of
    indifferently maintained private gravel road that dropped 430-some feet;
    the steepest bit, about a quarter-mile, is probably 15 percent or
    thereabouts. Frankly, it's not much fun, even with 700x30 or 700x40
    rubber. Got a bit easier once I added top-mounted brake levers to give me
    a more upright position on the way down, but you still take a beating,
    especially on washboard.

    But if you're only doing that one ugly-ass half mile, a steel cyclo-cross
    bike is a good all-rounder. It doesn't do anything perfectly -- outside of
    racing cyclo-cross -- but it does pretty much everything acceptably.

    Cheers,

    Patrick O'Grady
    Mad Dog Media
    http://www.maddogmedia.com
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, Fred
    Barney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David L. Johnson says...
    >
    >
    >
    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    I used to ride a Steelman Eurocross down a 1.1-mile stretch of
    indifferently maintained private gravel road that dropped 430-some feet;
    the steepest bit, about a quarter-mile, is probably 15 percent or
    thereabouts. Frankly, it's not much fun, even with 700x30 or 700x40
    rubber. Got a bit easier once I added top-mounted brake levers to give me
    a more upright position on the way down, but you still take a beating,
    especially on washboard.

    But if you're only doing that one ugly-ass half mile, a steel cyclo-cross
    bike is a good all-rounder. It doesn't do anything perfectly -- outside of
    racing cyclo-cross -- but it does pretty much everything acceptably.

    Cheers,

    Patrick O'Grady
    Mad Dog Media
    http://www.maddogmedia.com
     
  7. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Thinking very correctly I believe.

    Maybe something like a Surly Pacer frame with 28mm (handles wider w/o
    fenders) tires and standard reach brakes might be worth looking into on
    the lighter end of things.

    The Cyclocross/Touring type bike's a winner, as you can change the flavour
    of the bike simply by switching out the rubber.

    If you know exactly what you want and enjoy affordable luddite tech, a
    custom hearth-forged Mercian might be just the ticket.

    Thorns might be worth a look. The bikes I mean. :p

    Many other options, what does your local bike shop sell?

    Rivs are very sexy, but you can get a bike with most of the same features
    for half the cost if you don't want/need the fancy lugs and paint. Nice
    bikes though, if you've got the coin.
     
  8. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Thinking very correctly I believe.

    Maybe something like a Surly Pacer frame with 28mm (handles wider w/o
    fenders) tires and standard reach brakes might be worth looking into on
    the lighter end of things.

    The Cyclocross/Touring type bike's a winner, as you can change the flavour
    of the bike simply by switching out the rubber.

    If you know exactly what you want and enjoy affordable luddite tech, a
    custom hearth-forged Mercian might be just the ticket.

    Thorns might be worth a look. The bikes I mean. :p

    Many other options, what does your local bike shop sell?

    Rivs are very sexy, but you can get a bike with most of the same features
    for half the cost if you don't want/need the fancy lugs and paint. Nice
    bikes though, if you've got the coin.
     
  9. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Thinking very correctly I believe.

    Maybe something like a Surly Pacer frame with 28mm (handles wider w/o
    fenders) tires and standard reach brakes might be worth looking into on
    the lighter end of things.

    The Cyclocross/Touring type bike's a winner, as you can change the flavour
    of the bike simply by switching out the rubber.

    If you know exactly what you want and enjoy affordable luddite tech, a
    custom hearth-forged Mercian might be just the ticket.

    Thorns might be worth a look. The bikes I mean. :p

    Many other options, what does your local bike shop sell?

    Rivs are very sexy, but you can get a bike with most of the same features
    for half the cost if you don't want/need the fancy lugs and paint. Nice
    bikes though, if you've got the coin.
     
  10. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Thinking very correctly I believe.

    Maybe something like a Surly Pacer frame with 28mm (handles wider w/o
    fenders) tires and standard reach brakes might be worth looking into on
    the lighter end of things.

    The Cyclocross/Touring type bike's a winner, as you can change the flavour
    of the bike simply by switching out the rubber.

    If you know exactly what you want and enjoy affordable luddite tech, a
    custom hearth-forged Mercian might be just the ticket.

    Thorns might be worth a look. The bikes I mean. :p

    Many other options, what does your local bike shop sell?

    Rivs are very sexy, but you can get a bike with most of the same features
    for half the cost if you don't want/need the fancy lugs and paint. Nice
    bikes though, if you've got the coin.
     
  11. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Thinking very correctly I believe.

    Maybe something like a Surly Pacer frame with 28mm (handles wider w/o
    fenders) tires and standard reach brakes might be worth looking into on
    the lighter end of things.

    The Cyclocross/Touring type bike's a winner, as you can change the flavour
    of the bike simply by switching out the rubber.

    If you know exactly what you want and enjoy affordable luddite tech, a
    custom hearth-forged Mercian might be just the ticket.

    Thorns might be worth a look. The bikes I mean. :p

    Many other options, what does your local bike shop sell?

    Rivs are very sexy, but you can get a bike with most of the same features
    for half the cost if you don't want/need the fancy lugs and paint. Nice
    bikes though, if you've got the coin.
     
  12. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
    _`\(,_ | mathematics.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  13. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
    _`\(,_ | mathematics.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  14. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
    _`\(,_ | mathematics.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  15. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
    _`\(,_ | mathematics.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  16. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    > have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    > best choice.


    There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | The lottery is a tax on those who fail to understand
    _`\(,_ | mathematics.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  17. >Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    bike such as Bruce Gordon model?

    I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    aren't the answer

    I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    use it for abt anything?
     
  18. >Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    bike such as Bruce Gordon model?

    I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    aren't the answer

    I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    use it for abt anything?
     
  19. >Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    bike such as Bruce Gordon model?

    I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    aren't the answer

    I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    use it for abt anything?
     
  20. >Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    bike such as Bruce Gordon model?

    I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    aren't the answer

    I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    use it for abt anything?
     
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