trike tandem joy..

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Dave, Mar 2, 2003.

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  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Saw my first trike tandem to-day whilst shipping family to Cannock Chase in Volvo for a 'pleasant
    afternoon stroll'. I came upon them as we were entering a double white central line section of the
    road. Riders were 1 male (front) & 1 female (back), both happily clad in lycra, hi-viz and h*lm*ts
    (sensible folk ;-). I took great delight in the fact that I couldn't safely overtake, both due to
    the fact that there was a double white line and the tandem itself. This meant that I could sit back
    and enjoy the spectacle justifiably and none of the car drivers behind could 'voice' their
    objections. No.1 son in rear of car thought the sight hilarious (he's hardcore downhill / jumper,
    never yet and never will wear lycra, use lights etc.etc.) I pointed all the pros out to him, but he
    wasn't having any of it. The tandem riders then decided to turn right. Having let them move into
    position, I gently braked to allow them to turn. Coming in the opposite direction was what looked
    like half a dozen lycra clad club riders on racers. No.1 son commented that they would 'laugh their
    socks off' when they saw the tandem (he didn't actually use that phrase but you get the drift?). I
    advised he watched closely. Sure enough, a respectful cheery wave and greeting was exchanged between
    the two, the tandem turned right and we carried on our way, me gladdened by the experience, No.1
    son, somewhat silenced.

    A most unexpected, yet enjoyable 2 minutes worth of my day that I thought I'd like to
    share with you.

    Cheers, happy cycling,

    Dave.
    p.s. - I believe I am what has been described herein as a cyclist, whilst No.1 son is a person
    with a bike ;-)
    p.p.s. - hope the weather holds out for tomorrow as I could do with a ride following today's
    pleasant stroll ;-)
     
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  2. "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Saw my first trike tandem to-day ...

    There's an ancient-looking trike tandem that I sometimes see around here which is invariably piloted
    by a bloke who looks as though he might be nearer seventy than sixty, usually in team colours and a
    cotton cap of the sort that even I think of as being worn by a generation different from mine. I've
    tried to follow him, and someone I presume might conceivably be his wife, up the gentle inclines
    that pass for hills around here, and it's an intimidating experience.
     
  3. [email protected] schreef ...
    > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Saw my first trike tandem to-day ...
    >
    > There's an ancient-looking trike tandem that I sometimes see around here which is invariably
    > piloted by a bloke who looks as though he might be nearer seventy than sixty, usually in team
    > colours and a cotton cap of the sort that even I think of as being worn by a generation different
    > from mine. I've tried to follow him, and someone I presume might conceivably be his wife, up the
    > gentle inclines that pass for hills around here, and it's an intimidating experience.

    Visit a Tandem Club event and these wonderful machines will flock around you. We're used to seeing
    at least two, very often four or five of them. We also have test ridden one: un unnerving experience
    since you can't lean into a bend. You have to actually steer it. And it will continually tend to
    "slide off" the camber of the road. The owners (invariably UK inhabitants) always develop severe
    pains in their shoulders whenever they come to the mainland. Only one side is fully developed ;-)

    --
    Regards, Marten
     
  4. John B

    John B Guest

    Marten Hoffmann wrote:

    > [email protected] schreef ...
    > > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > Saw my first trike tandem to-day ...
    > >
    > Visit a Tandem Club event and these wonderful machines will flock around you. We're used to seeing
    > at least two, very often four or five of them. We also have test ridden one: un unnerving
    > experience since you can't lean into a bend. You have to actually steer it.

    The rider has to lean, if not the inside wheel will lift and the machine will tip over. Our tandem
    trike is OWD (like many) which also means that weight has to be shifted around to ensure drive is
    maintained. Steep roads uphill especially in autumn with wet laeves can be very difficult. i have
    had my stoker jump off and push ;-)

    > And it will continually tend to "slide off" the camber of the road.

    It is a continual fight to keep the damn thing out of the gutter. lose concentation for a split
    second and collision with teh vege/kerb is inevitable.

    > The owners (invariably UK inhabitants) always develop severe pains in their shoulders whenever
    > they come to the mainland. Only one side is fully developed ;-)

    John B
     
  5. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Mon, 03 Mar 2003 23:48:13 +0000, John B <jpb.design[email protected]> wrote:

    >Marten Hoffmann wrote:
    >
    >> [email protected] schreef ...
    >> > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > > Saw my first trike tandem to-day ...
    >> >
    >> Visit a Tandem Club event and these wonderful machines will flock around you. We're used to
    >> seeing at least two, very often four or five of them. We also have test ridden one: un unnerving
    >> experience since you can't lean into a bend. You have to actually steer it.
    >
    >The rider has to lean, if not the inside wheel will lift and the machine will tip over.

    I shout "Ready about" to get my stoker to shift their weight ;-)

    >Our tandem trike is OWD (like many) which also means that weight has to be shifted around to ensure
    >drive is maintained. Steep roads uphill especially in autumn with wet laeves can be very difficult.
    >i have had my stoker jump off and push ;-)

    Keeps them in their place too. But of course there's none of that falling over when forward speed
    falls below critical minimum. (I could never get the hang of trackstands)

    >
    >> And it will continually tend to "slide off" the camber of the road.
    >
    >It is a continual fight to keep the damn thing out of the gutter. lose concentation for a split
    >second and collision with teh vege/kerb is inevitable.

    When we first got ours I never thought I'd get the hang of it. Now it's easier, just have to
    remember to move the handle bars. A much more positive action is needed than than on a two wheeler.

    Tim
    --

    fast and gripping, non pompous, glossy and credible.
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Tim Hall wrote:

    > When we first got ours I never thought I'd get the hang of it. Now it's easier, just have to
    > remember to move the handle bars. A much more positive action is needed than than on a two
    > wheeler.

    Last time I was over at Kinetics I had a play on Ben's Kettwiesel delta 'bent trike. I consciously
    knew about the steering before I got on, but in any case made straight for the kerb! It's really
    quite odd having to consciously steer right *with the bars* all the time just to keep going
    straight. The Kett has the added bonus of major brake steer (to the extent you ban literally do
    handbrake turns), which made for some, ummm, "interesting" trajectories while I was getting the
    hang of it...

    Another interesting thing about the Hase Kettwiesel is that you can remove the front wheel from
    a second one and hook it onto the back of a lead trike, to make a 5 wheeler tandem. Or a 7
    wheeler triplet if you keep on. Apparently it shouldn't be attempted with more than 5 vehicles
    joined together!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Tim Hall wrote:
    >
    > > When we first got ours I never thought I'd get the hang of it. Now it's easier, just have to
    > > remember to move the handle bars. A much more positive action is needed than than on a two
    > > wheeler.
    >
    > Last time I was over at Kinetics I had a play on Ben's Kettwiesel delta 'bent trike. I consciously
    > knew about the steering before I got on, but in any case made straight for the kerb! It's really
    > quite odd having to consciously steer right *with the bars* all the time just to keep going
    > straight. The Kett has the added bonus of major brake steer (to the extent you ban literally do
    > handbrake turns), which made for some, ummm, "interesting" trajectories while I was getting the
    > hang of it...
    >
    > Another interesting thing about the Hase Kettwiesel is that you can remove the front wheel from a
    > second one and hook it onto the back of a lead trike, to make a 5 wheeler tandem. Or a 7 wheeler
    > triplet if you keep on. Apparently it shouldn't be attempted with more than 5 vehicles joined
    > together!
    >
    > Pete.

    ....ahh, environmentally friendly public transport then....
     
  8. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Another interesting thing about the Hase Kettwiesel is that you can remove the front wheel from a
    > second one and hook it onto the back of a lead trike, to make a 5 wheeler tandem. Or a 7 wheeler
    > triplet if you keep on.

    Can you remove the front wheel of the lead one and join it the back of the last one to make an
    instant roundabout?

    --
    Dave...
     
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