What's the worst race loss ever?



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T

Tony

Guest
I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.

So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

To prime the pump, I offer these up:

1989 Tour de France Laurent Fignon suffers a devastating loss on his home turf, losing the final
Paris time trial. Greg Lemond makes up 50 seconds in the final
24.5 km stage to win by only 8 seconds, averaging 33.8 mph in a 54x12. The day before Fignon had
congratulated Lemond on his fine second place finish, thinking he (Fignon) had this one in the
bag. On the podium, Lemond tells Fignon, “now we’ve both won two, let’s see
what happens next year.” Lemond would go on to win the following year. Fignon would ride
the Tour four more times but it was the last time he would ever see the podium.

1990 Paris-Roubaix Canadian Steve Bauer suffers a heartbreaking finish line photo finish loss to
Eddy Planckaert after a valiant race. Planckaert had a teammate in the velodrome, but when van
Hooydonck went from far off, Bauer was on his wheel and looked set to win. Planckaert came through
on the outside to pip him at the line. As close as you can get to winning the Queen of the Classics
(except maybe for Gibus’s win over Ballerini in 1993).

1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple crashes
and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming encouragement of
his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw puts his head down
and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan throws his bike at the
line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it could get but it was not to
be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet he always looked behind him
after that one!

1984 Los Angeles Olympics Our man Bauer again. In the final break, he is one on one with noted
non-sprinter Alexi Grewal. I’m sure Bauer must have played the last minutes of this race in
his head over and over again, trying to figure out how he blew this big win. Clearly the stronger
finisher, this should have been a done deal. He waited but could do nothing as the skinny climber
from Colorado beat him to the gold medal.

What are your choices?
 
H

Heather Halvors

Guest
Tony wrote:
>
> 1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
> become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple
> crashes and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming
> encouragement of his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw
> puts his head down and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan
> throws his bike at the line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it
> could get but it was not to be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet
> he always looked behind him after that one!
>

you sold me on that one- i just ordered the video, even with the overpriced shipping charge.

heather
 
D

Derek

Guest
You must live in Indianapolis!

Tony <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>
> To prime the pump, I offer these up:
>
> 1989 Tour de France Laurent Fignon suffers a devastating loss on his home turf, losing the final
> Paris time trial. Greg Lemond makes up 50 seconds in the final
> 24.5 km stage to win by only 8 seconds, averaging 33.8 mph in a 54x12. The day before Fignon had
> congratulated Lemond on his fine second place finish, thinking he (Fignon) had this one in the
> bag. On the podium, Lemond tells Fignon, “now we’ve both won two, let’s see
> what happens next year.” Lemond would go on to win the following year. Fignon would ride
> the Tour four more times but it was the last time he would ever see the podium.
>
> 1990 Paris-Roubaix Canadian Steve Bauer suffers a heartbreaking finish line photo finish loss to
> Eddy Planckaert after a valiant race. Planckaert had a teammate in the velodrome, but when van
> Hooydonck went from far off, Bauer was on his wheel and looked set to win. Planckaert came through
> on the outside to pip him at the line. As close as you can get to winning the Queen of the
> Classics (except maybe for Gibus’s win over Ballerini in 1993).
>
> 1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
> become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple
> crashes and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming
> encouragement of his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw
> puts his head down and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan
> throws his bike at the line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it
> could get but it was not to be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet
> he always looked behind him after that one!
>
> 1984 Los Angeles Olympics Our man Bauer again. In the final break, he is one on one with noted
> non-sprinter Alexi Grewal. I’m sure Bauer must have played the last minutes of this race in
> his head over and over again, trying to figure out how he blew this big win. Clearly the stronger
> finisher, this should have been a done deal. He waited but could do nothing as the skinny climber
> from Colorado beat him to the gold medal.
>
> What are your choices?
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
How about the biggest turnaround in history?

I suggest that Rob Palachick telling everyone that he had pizza and beer with Johann Museeuw and
then beat him in a training ride. He then took the name Ronde Champ to celebrate it.

When someone pointed out how sad a liar he must have been since Museeuw wasn't in Philadelphia at
the time nor even on this continent.

Ronde responded that he was just kidding and became the hero of half of the group.

"Tony" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>
> To prime the pump, I offer these up:
>
> 1989 Tour de France Laurent Fignon suffers a devastating loss on his home turf, losing the final
> Paris time trial. Greg Lemond makes up 50 seconds in the final
> 24.5 km stage to win by only 8 seconds, averaging 33.8 mph in a 54x12. The day before Fignon had
> congratulated Lemond on his fine second place finish, thinking he (Fignon) had this one in the
> bag. On the podium, Lemond tells Fignon, “now we’ve both won two, let’s see
> what happens next year.” Lemond would go on to win the following year. Fignon would ride
> the Tour four more times but it was the last time he would ever see the podium.
>
> 1990 Paris-Roubaix Canadian Steve Bauer suffers a heartbreaking finish line photo finish loss to
> Eddy Planckaert after a valiant race. Planckaert had a teammate in the velodrome, but when van
> Hooydonck went from far off, Bauer was on his wheel and looked set to win. Planckaert came through
> on the outside to pip him at the line. As close as you can get to winning the Queen of the
> Classics (except maybe for Gibus’s win over Ballerini in 1993).
>
> 1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
> become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple
> crashes and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming
> encouragement of his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw
> puts his head down and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan
> throws his bike at the line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it
> could get but it was not to be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet
> he always looked behind him after that one!
>
> 1984 Los Angeles Olympics Our man Bauer again. In the final break, he is one on one with noted
> non-sprinter Alexi Grewal. I’m sure Bauer must have played the last minutes of this race in
> his head over and over again, trying to figure out how he blew this big win. Clearly the stronger
> finisher, this should have been a done deal. He waited but could do nothing as the skinny climber
> from Colorado beat him to the gold medal.
>
> What are your choices?
 
B

Bob Schwartz

Guest
For heartbreak it is difficult to top the 1947 Tour.

"King" Rene Vietto, who had proven such a selfless teammate in the 1934 Tour that he sacrificed his
own excellent chances to win in order to preserve those of his team leader, was clearly at the end
of his career. He had enough left in the tank to take the lead on the second stage. A noted climber
he was able to maintain that lead through the mountains. After having lost so many of his best years
to the war this looked like his last, best chance.

And so it was until the disaster of the stage 19 time trial. In the shadow of Paris, faced with a
monsterous 139(!)km TT he coughed up 14:40 to Raymond Impanis and handed over the yellow jersey to
the Italian Pierre Brambilla. This was a big deal that close to the end of the war and the Italian
team, with Aldo Ronconi in second faced a peloton united against them on the final stage. And so
it was that the unfortunate Brambilla and his exhaused Italian teammates came in 20 minutes behind
the stage winner, giving up the victory to Jean Robic. Robic became the first winner to have never
led the race.

Bob Schwartz [email protected]
 
G

Gopher

Guest
On 9 Jan 2003 14:29:02 -0800, [email protected] (Tony) wrote:

>I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
>the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
>worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
>So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

Don't know the name of ithe race or the year, but the one where Beppe Saronni has his hands high and
proud in the air celebrating his victory. It's all just a bit prematurely, though, as someone slips
right under his outstretched arms with a bike throw for the win....

...the look on his face IS priceless.

While it may not be the worst loss of all time, it is one of the MOST embarrassing, for sure.

g.
 
R

Ronde Chimp

Guest
Both of Steve Bauer's losses were excruciatingly close. The sheer closeness of the Paris Roubaix
race is the winner in my books, but his Olympic loss to Alexi Grewal makes me wince to this day.

I don't think anybody's mentioned Lance's loss to Boogerd in the 1999 Amstel Gold. Armstrong led the
wheel-sucking Boogerd for over 20K and was outsprinted at the line. Another painfully close loss. On
the podium, Armstrong looks like he could **** bullets.

Thanks, Ronde Chimp
 
B

Bret Wade

Guest
Tony wrote:

> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

Roche and Criquelion play cat and mouse at the end of the '87 L-B-L only to be caught and beaten by
Arginten at the line. Not only did Roche lose, but he had to hear Criquelion whine about it too. The
rest of the season went better.

Bret
 
R

Robert Chung

Guest
"Tony" <[email protected]> wrote
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

Hmmm. That's a tough one, in part because it would take quite a failure to match the way THE GIANTS
FOLDED AGAINST THE NINERS. I think the 1984 Olympics has to count high because Grewal wasn't really
top-notch competition, and it must hurt a lot to lose to mediocrity (rather like THE GIANTS FOLDING
AGAINST THE NINERS). Getting beat is bad enough, but losing is worse, and THE GIANTS DIDN'T GET
BEAT, THEY LOST.

On the other hand, 8 seconds over the course of three weeks and 3300 km must sting, especially after
trash-talking the previous day. There's a photo in the new "Cent ans du Tour de France" that was
taken of the podium, Lemond on the top step with a huge grin on his face, his eyes sparkling, his
energy leaping off the page. Fignon's got the unfocused dead-fish thousand-yard stare, replaying the
last 24 km over and over (and over) in his mind, eating his liver from the inside out. Ouch. That
couldn't taste good.
 
S

Steve McGinty

Guest
On 9 Jan 2003 14:29:02 -0800, [email protected] (Tony) wrote:

>I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
>the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
>worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
>So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>

Robert Millar - 1985 Vuelta

http://www.ileach.co.uk/post/bob/vuelta.html

Cheers! Stephen
 
J

Jtn

Guest
YOU ALL MISSED IT it was paris roubaix in 1988 when Dirk De Mol won, when (?) got a plastic bag
stuck in his rear derailleur at with about 2k to the finish.

he would have crushed de mol, BUT HE DIDNT. now de mol is on the list of past WINNERS and (?) isnt.
its funny how you never remember the 2nd place person.....
 
B

Brian Roth

Guest
[email protected] (Tony) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>
Early 90's Amstal Gold. Luc Roosen celebrates too early, and Adri Van Der Poel picks his pocket.
They used to use this in a Time pedal ad, Roosen has a "Oh S***" look on his face. It would have
been his biggest win. Maybe the biggest 'bonehead loss' instead of 'worst loss'.

Concerning the 94 Flanders: Which would be the bigger loss, Museeuw's near miss of (what would have
been at the time) a 3rd win, or if Bugno would have lost it by showboating? At any rate, Bugno
robbed himself of a good finish line photo....

Robert Miller is mentioned a few times in other responses, he also was lead off course in a TdF
stage once. I think Ghirotto was the eventual beneficiary.

Fignon also had a 89'esque loss in the 84 Giro where technology again played a role in the final TT.
He went up against Moser's then new 'funny bike' on a fairly normal Gitane. It didn't help that the
TV copter allegedly flew low and behind Moser, giving him a artificial tailwind, or the cancellation
of a mountain stage, due to imaginary snow, witch benefited Moser. Last stage TT's were Fignons two
greatest losses.

1990? Paris Roubaix. Henrik Redant is off the front near the end of the race. He suffers a puncture
and can't get timely service. A big 'what if' for him.

Early 60's TdF. Jan Janssen takes the final stage TT and overall from (was it Hermann Van
Springle?).

1989 Tour de France stage 3 (?). Rudy Dahnens has it in the bag, going thru the last roundabout. He
rolls a tire, or just looses traction, and falls. He goes from a sure win, to the last across the
line. Dahnens never had any luck, and died in a car wreck a few years ago.

1993 Tour of Lombardy. Pascal Richard finds the finish line about 50 meters too far after a long
solo escape, and Bobrik takes his biggest win.

1978, this one race in Indiana. This one guy from this Italian team visiting the USA stuck his frame
pump in the spokes of this other local guy that trained real hard for the race. To make matters
worse, the local guy idolized the Italian guys. That was really the worst loss of all....
 
G

Garry Jones

Guest
Tony wrote:
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

For me it is Niclas Axelsson in the Giro di Lombardia in 2000.

I have known Niclas since I first moved to Sweden in 1988. He was just 16 at the time. I lived in
his home town and followed his career since he won the Swedish junior championship that same year.

When he turned pro I announced his arrival to the world scene here in rec.bicycles.racing in the
thread "man to watch".

http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=344F8049.4769BDA7%40ebox.tninet.se&output=gplain

Although good in the hills and the occasional time trail he was never a sprinter and ended up with a
lot of second and third places. He was 6th in the Giro in 1999 and it looked like his days were
coming. It was regarded by many that his best chance to a major victory would be after a tactical
breakaway at the right moment. He did this in the 94th Giro di Lombardia on Oct 21st 2000.

Having seen him make his move at the right time and seen that the chasers were watching each other I
started to get very excited. I phoned around to a few more mates to make sure my local cycling mates
were watching this live performance unfold on Eurosport. He had gone with about 35 km to go.

As the finish line got closer and closer I was shouting at the TV, Axelsson was 40 seconds up, 7km
to go. I have never felt so involved in a live television broadcast before or since. I was punching
the air in happiness, glued to the TV. Here was a guy I had cycled training rides of 230 km with. A
guy I had trained with in the snow and ice of the Swedish winter. He punctured with 4km to go and
with no time to change a wheel he pedalled on for all he was worth. It still looked like he would
do it. It was all downhill to the finish. There were now only two guys in the chase. They worked
together, had they both held out for victory Axelsson would have won. However Casagrande upset the
Swedish commentator, myself and Axelsson by letting Rumsas ride on his wheel, they caught Axelsson
with 100 metres to go and Rumsas sprinted home easily. Axelsson third. The Swedes asked why
Casagrande sacrificed himself to give the race to Rumsas. I was just sad. At first you don't dare
to hope, then you start to get excited and believe it may happen, then that it will happen, and
then disaster.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/results/2000/oct00/lombardia/lombresults.shtml

What happened to Axelsson?

He tested positive at the worlds in 2001 and received a four year ban from the Swedish cycling
federation. From what I have heard he has not said anything to anyone about his case, he has refused
to answer quesitons and no longer rides a bike.

Garry Jones English cyclist, ResIDING in Sweden
 
B

Bruce Johnston

Guest
I have seen a fair number of races over the years but one that really comes to mind is when
Djamolidine Abdoujaparov crashed into a photographer during the final sprint for the line on the
last day of the TDF in Paris. He got a concussion and laid on the course for quite a while. He
was knocked cold and the sight of that crash on video is truely horrific. It was a high speed
train wreck!

Bruce
-------------------------
"Tony" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>
> To prime the pump, I offer these up:
>
> 1989 Tour de France Laurent Fignon suffers a devastating loss on his home turf, losing the final
> Paris time trial. Greg Lemond makes up 50 seconds in the final
> 24.5 km stage to win by only 8 seconds, averaging 33.8 mph in a 54x12. The day before Fignon had
> congratulated Lemond on his fine second place finish, thinking he (Fignon) had this one in the
> bag. On the podium, Lemond tells Fignon, “now we’ve both won two, let’s see
> what happens next year.” Lemond would go on to win the following year. Fignon would ride
> the Tour four more times but it was the last time he would ever see the podium.
>
> 1990 Paris-Roubaix Canadian Steve Bauer suffers a heartbreaking finish line photo finish loss to
> Eddy Planckaert after a valiant race. Planckaert had a teammate in the velodrome, but when van
> Hooydonck went from far off, Bauer was on his wheel and looked set to win. Planckaert came through
> on the outside to pip him at the line. As close as you can get to winning the Queen of the
> Classics (except maybe for Gibus’s win over Ballerini in 1993).
>
> 1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
> become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple
> crashes and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming
> encouragement of his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw
> puts his head down and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan
> throws his bike at the line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it
> could get but it was not to be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet
> he always looked behind him after that one!
>
> 1984 Los Angeles Olympics Our man Bauer again. In the final break, he is one on one with noted
> non-sprinter Alexi Grewal. I’m sure Bauer must have played the last minutes of this race in
> his head over and over again, trying to figure out how he blew this big win. Clearly the stronger
> finisher, this should have been a done deal. He waited but could do nothing as the skinny climber
> from Colorado beat him to the gold medal.
>
> What are your choices?
 
G

Glen Goins

Guest
[email protected] (Tony) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>
> To prime the pump, I offer these up:
>
> 1989 Tour de France Laurent Fignon suffers a devastating loss on his home turf, losing the final
> Paris time trial. Greg Lemond makes up 50 seconds in the final
> 24.5 km stage to win by only 8 seconds, averaging 33.8 mph in a 54x12. The day before Fignon had
> congratulated Lemond on his fine second place finish, thinking he (Fignon) had this one in the
> bag. On the podium, Lemond tells Fignon, “now we’ve both won two, let’s see
> what happens next year.” Lemond would go on to win the following year. Fignon would ride
> the Tour four more times but it was the last time he would ever see the podium.
>
> 1990 Paris-Roubaix Canadian Steve Bauer suffers a heartbreaking finish line photo finish loss to
> Eddy Planckaert after a valiant race. Planckaert had a teammate in the velodrome, but when van
> Hooydonck went from far off, Bauer was on his wheel and looked set to win. Planckaert came through
> on the outside to pip him at the line. As close as you can get to winning the Queen of the
> Classics (except maybe for Gibus’s win over Ballerini in 1993).
>
> 1994 Ronde van Vlaanderen No one has won the Tour of Flanders four times. Johan Museeuw would have
> become the first in 1998, but for a tire width four years earlier. Coming back from multiple
> crashes and flats, Museeuw scrabbles his way back to the front of the race to the screaming
> encouragement of his countrymen, but Italian Gianni Bugno is just too far ahead. Or is he? Museeuw
> puts his head down and motors to the line while Bugno is starting his victory celebration. Johan
> throws his bike at the line as Bugno, with arms up, looks over in shock. It was as close as it
> could get but it was not to be for the Leeuw van Vlaanderen that day. Bugno wins by an inch. Bet
> he always looked behind him after that one!
>
> 1984 Los Angeles Olympics Our man Bauer again. In the final break, he is one on one with noted
> non-sprinter Alexi Grewal. I’m sure Bauer must have played the last minutes of this race in
> his head over and over again, trying to figure out how he blew this big win. Clearly the stronger
> finisher, this should have been a done deal. He waited but could do nothing as the skinny climber
> from Colorado beat him to the gold medal.
>
> What are your choices?

1. Paris-Roubaix (90's) I forget what year it was, but what about the Thomas Wegmuller losing
Paris-Roubaix to Dirk DeMol (sp?) I remember Wegmuller and DeMol were coming into the final
kilos of the finish (they finished on the streets and not in the velodrome) and a small plastic
bag blew in from the side of the street and got stuck in Wegmuller's rear derailluer! He was
stuck in what looked like his 53/13, the team mechanic leans out of the car and tries to get the
plastic bag out of the derailluer. He pulls most of it out but what is left of the bag is stuck
in the pulleys. As the sprint is lead out by DeMol, Wegmuller tries to jump but looks like he is
pedaling in sand.....sad indeed.

2. World Championships (Japan) Not sure of this year either (90's). Final lap of the race and I
believe it is Rudy Dahnens, and PDM teamate Dirk De Wolf were in front of a chasing field by
seconds. Then Dag Otto Lauritzen attacks the field and bridges up to them. As Lauritzen rides up
to the wheel of the duo, De Wolf looks back leaving one hand on the handlebars and then loses
control of his bike. He goes down and takes Lauritzen down with him! Dahnen waits for De Wolf
and the two continue on without Lauritzen staying away to the finish with Dahnens taking the
Rainbow Jersey. Lauritzen was caught by the field. Lauritzen was really strong that day and had
attacked repeatedly. You never know what he could have done in a 3 man sprint but I believe he
was a better sprinter at the time than the other two.
 
C

Curtis L. Russe

Guest
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

Because he got so few chances as a leader, the World road race when Dag-Otto Lauritzen was taken
down when he had a clear shot for the title. Can't remember the year or who took him down. Would
have been the highlight of a solid career.

Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA)
 
B

Brian Roth

Guest
[email protected] (Tony) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
>
>

LA Olympics, 1984. Team Pursuit final. USA vs. Australia. At the start Dave Grylls toe strap breaks,
instantly putting the US at a man disadvantage, with no hope of beating a well drilled Aussie 4 man
team. They take the silver, however.

1996 Atlanta Kilo final. Favored Shane Kelly has a pedal fail at the start. In an instant, Olympic
dreams go up in smoke.
 
B

Benjo Maso

Guest
"Tony" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht news:[email protected]...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?
What are your choices?

One of the worst was in 1958 in the last stage of the Tour in Paris, when just before the finish
André Darrigade (who was leading the pack) hit an offical who was bending forward. Darrigade lost
the race, but the offcial died.

Benjo Maso
 
B

Boyd Speerschne

Guest
WTF is this? A thread about bike racing? In this newsgroup? ;)

But seriously, my favorite was in a recent Giro when Julio Perez Capio's campy 10 speed chain
snapped about 1 km from the summit of his first solo mountain stage win.

It was pretty classic as you could see the camera moto pull over and zoom in on his chainless drive
train as he pointed to it. He then threw his bike in the ditch as what was left of the peleton came
roaring by.

That would SUCK.

- Boyd S.

[email protected] (Tony) wrote in news:4c54ef01.0301091429.484308 @posting.google.com:

<snip>

> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

<snip
 
P

Pdannyd

Guest
"Tony" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I was listening to a sports talk radio show yesterday on my drive to work and they were discussing
> the recent woes of the local football team. Some fans were calling in saying it was perhaps the
> worst loss of all time. It got me to thinking of the cycling equivalent.
>
> So, what is the worst pro cycling race loss of all time?

Did Miguel Indurain turn up a few minutes late for a time trial in Le Tour De France one year then
lose the yellow by the same margin?
 
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