The Real Cost of a Car: about 2-3K a year

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by C P, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. C P

    C P Guest

    It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles stating
    that I had to prove to them that I had insurance during the time after I dumped my old insurance
    company and signed up for a new one. Otherwise it would be a fifty dollar fine.

    The letter went into the wastebasket.

    A couple of weeks later a notice appeared from NCDMV that my plates were revoked and I was
    instructed to send in the plates for 30 days, pay the fine and to not drive the car. I pick up a
    beat up old Schwinn World at Goodwill for 10 bucks, and 50 dollars into a bike repair tool kit, and
    am soon riding my bike to work daily.

    By this time, I am happy riding my bike around, enjoy the exercise and low cost, so I decide the car
    has to go. I have found that I get around just fine on the bike, and enjoy riding it immensely why
    pay for travel inside a box anyway? I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the
    fines I have paid this year).

    Depreciation - 500 Gas - 300 (+/- 100) Insurance - 600 Car 'Property' Taxes / Licensing Fees - 100
    (or so) Repair / Maint (includes emissions inspection) - 500 +/- 100 (a conservative figure)

    About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs. There
    is the cost of knowing that if you dont do this or that with the car by such and such time there
    will be this and that happen to you with X financial penalties as result. That worry is gone once
    the car is gone.

    There is one other thing that should be considered. Oil prices will probably to go up in the next 5
    to 10 years, and because of looting of taxpayer money, states will be looking for more ways to tax
    the hell out of people to make up the difference. Odds are that car owners will be getting soaked
    even more. So I figure it is best to get rid of the car now, before these costs take affect.

    That puts an extra 2000 a year (or maybe more) in the bank to spend how I please when the car is
    gone. So of the 2000 I save will be spent on occasionally renting a car on a as needed basis, If I
    rent a car once a month for getting major things done, cats to the vet, big ticket shopping, etc,
    the yearly cost is 500, still way less than what I am paying now by owning a car. The rest of the
    money can be invested or blown on something I want.

    But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping since
    it is not so convenient to take off to the store as it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only
    buy the things I need and am able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    means when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is
    not a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my
    overall shopping costs are way down.

    I find that I am getting more exercise, will there be lower health care costs as a result?
    I think so.

    Just curious, why don't more people think like this?
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    one word: convenience.

    Mike "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles
    > stating that I had to prove to them that I had insurance during the time after I dumped my old
    > insurance company and
    signed
    > up for a new one. Otherwise it would be a fifty dollar fine.
    >
    > The letter went into the wastebasket.
    >
    > A couple of weeks later a notice appeared from NCDMV that my plates were revoked and I was
    > instructed to send in the plates for 30 days, pay the
    fine
    > and to not drive the car. I pick up a beat up old Schwinn World at
    Goodwill
    > for 10 bucks, and 50 dollars into a bike repair tool kit, and am soon
    riding
    > my bike to work daily.
    >
    > By this time, I am happy riding my bike around, enjoy the exercise and low cost, so I decide the
    > car has to go. I have found that I get around just fine on the bike, and enjoy riding it immensely
    > why pay for travel inside
    a
    > box anyway? I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the fines I have paid
    > this year).
    >
    > Depreciation - 500 Gas - 300 (+/- 100) Insurance - 600 Car 'Property' Taxes / Licensing Fees - 100
    > (or so) Repair / Maint (includes emissions inspection) - 500 +/- 100 (a
    conservative
    > figure)
    >
    > About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs.
    > There is the cost of knowing that if you dont do
    this
    > or that with the car by such and such time there will be this and that happen to you with X
    > financial penalties as result. That worry is gone
    once
    > the car is gone.
    >
    > There is one other thing that should be considered. Oil prices will
    probably
    > to go up in the next 5 to 10 years, and because of looting of taxpayer money, states will be
    > looking for more ways to tax the hell out of people
    to
    > make up the difference. Odds are that car owners will be getting soaked
    even
    > more. So I figure it is best to get rid of the car now, before these costs take affect.
    >
    > That puts an extra 2000 a year (or maybe more) in the bank to spend how I please when the car is
    > gone. So of the 2000 I save will be spent on occasionally renting a car on a as needed basis, If I
    > rent a car once a month for getting major things done, cats to the vet, big ticket shopping, etc,
    > the yearly cost is 500, still way less than what I am paying now by owning a car. The rest of the
    > money can be invested or blown on something
    I
    > want.
    >
    > But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping since
    > it is not so convenient to take off to the store
    as
    > it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only buy the things I need and
    am
    > able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    means
    > when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is not a
    > lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my overall
    > shopping costs are way down.
    >
    > I find that I am getting more exercise, will there be lower health care costs as a result? I
    > think so.
    >
    > Just curious, why don't more people think like this?
    >
     
  3. Tom Gauldin

    Tom Gauldin Guest

    What about little things like rain, sleet, snow, freezing weather and strong winds?

    --

    Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV NEW EMAIL [email protected] NEW PHONE (702) 263-8804 voice/fax

    "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles
    > stating that I had to prove to them that I had
     
  4. Sparhawk

    Sparhawk Guest

    On Wed, 15 Jan 2003 23:46:33 GMT, "C P" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping since
    >it is not so convenient to take off to the store as it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only
    >buy the things I need and am able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    >means when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is
    >not a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my
    >overall shopping costs are way down.

    You'll probably save a lot of money on health costs also, unless that is you are killed or injured
    in traffic someday.

    Sparhawk
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 15 Jan 2003 23:46:33 GMT, <[email protected]>, "C P"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs.

    There are more costs than that. You must also account for the external costs to arrive at a more
    honest figure.

    Thirty two percent of the cost of driving is subsidised by non-drivers and those who drive more are
    subsidised by those who drive less.

    You only accounted for your fixed and variable "internal" costs. Your neighbours picked up the rest
    of the tab.

    Gas taxes and other user fees covered only 60 percent of the $33.3 billion spent on building,
    improving and repairing roads in 1989. Also not covered by user fees is the $68 billion spent
    annually on services such as highway patrols, traffic management, and traffic accident police work.

    Throw in the cost of pollution, time lost to congestion, depreciation of property value,
    uncompensated injuries, free parking, health costs due laziness and air pollution, etc.

    Driving is underpriced.

    http://www.flora.org/afo/cc1.html
    --
    zk
     
  6. I keep a spreadsheet to keep track of my costs. My initial intent was to rasionalize how little
    money it costs to ride my bike when looked at it in dollars per hour. As you can see on the table
    below I included everything from the bike to patch kits. Man, was I suprised. The only hope is that
    I keep on riding at the rate I have in the last couple of years. If I keep up this pace the bike
    will get inexpensive in a year or two... I hope...

    Oh, by the way, gas and car repairs cost over $4000 last year. Now that is expensive.

    My cost per mile is $0.43 My cost per hour is:$7.73 That is with 12,571 miles on my biles.

    Initial Bike Cost 12/29/2000 $3,656.14 Total Spent $5,396.71 Shorts $165.00 Jersey etc $260.00
    Chains $180.00 Miles Ridden 12571.4 Tires $300.00 2001 5064 Computer $20.00 2002 7412
    Overhaul(chain, brake hoods) $180.00 2003 95 co2 $80.00 Ave MPH 18 Pump $15.00 Gloves $50.00
    Hours Ridden 698.4111 Helmets $250.00 Tire Tubes $50.00 Cost per Hour $7.73 Chain Lube $24.00
    Chain Cleaner $25.00 Cost per Mile 0.429285 new tire,chain,SpinSkin $114.07 chain, derailleur
    adjustment $27.50

    "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles
    > stating that I had to prove to them that I had insurance during the time after I dumped my old
    > insurance company and
    signed
    > up for a new one. Otherwise it would be a fifty dollar fine.
    >
    > The letter went into the wastebasket.
    >
    > A couple of weeks later a notice appeared from NCDMV that my plates were revoked and I was
    > instructed to send in the plates for 30 days, pay the
    fine
    > and to not drive the car. I pick up a beat up old Schwinn World at
    Goodwill
    > for 10 bucks, and 50 dollars into a bike repair tool kit, and am soon
    riding
    > my bike to work daily.
    >
    > By this time, I am happy riding my bike around, enjoy the exercise and low cost, so I decide the
    > car has to go. I have found that I get around just fine on the bike, and enjoy riding it immensely
    > why pay for travel inside
    a
    > box anyway? I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the fines I have paid
    > this year).
    >
    > Depreciation - 500 Gas - 300 (+/- 100) Insurance - 600 Car 'Property' Taxes / Licensing Fees - 100
    > (or so) Repair / Maint (includes emissions inspection) - 500 +/- 100 (a
    conservative
    > figure)
    >
    > About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs.
    > There is the cost of knowing that if you dont do
    this
    > or that with the car by such and such time there will be this and that happen to you with X
    > financial penalties as result. That worry is gone
    once
    > the car is gone.
    >
    > There is one other thing that should be considered. Oil prices will
    probably
    > to go up in the next 5 to 10 years, and because of looting of taxpayer money, states will be
    > looking for more ways to tax the hell out of people
    to
    > make up the difference. Odds are that car owners will be getting soaked
    even
    > more. So I figure it is best to get rid of the car now, before these costs take affect.
    >
    > That puts an extra 2000 a year (or maybe more) in the bank to spend how I please when the car is
    > gone. So of the 2000 I save will be spent on occasionally renting a car on a as needed basis, If I
    > rent a car once a month for getting major things done, cats to the vet, big ticket shopping, etc,
    > the yearly cost is 500, still way less than what I am paying now by owning a car. The rest of the
    > money can be invested or blown on something
    I
    > want.
    >
    > But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping since
    > it is not so convenient to take off to the store
    as
    > it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only buy the things I need and
    am
    > able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    means
    > when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is not a
    > lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my overall
    > shopping costs are way down.
    >
    > I find that I am getting more exercise, will there be lower health care costs as a result? I
    > think so.
    >
    > Just curious, why don't more people think like this?
    >
     
  7. "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the fines I have paid this year).

    Our city (Seattle) did a one less car study here (see:
    http://www.cityofseattle.net/waytogo/demostudy.htm) and they estimated the cost of a car was $85 a
    week. That gives a higher price of $4420 for the annual cost of car ownership.

    Some other costs and savings I usually don't hear cited:

    I know that since I took up bicycle commuting on a regular basis, I spend a lot less money on work
    clothes -- both purchase and dry cleaning. Yes, I bought lot of bicycling-related clothing, so that
    goes in the spending column. But when I was not using the bike, I'd wear my work clothes not just to
    and from work, but I'd wear them at home, typically, until bedtime. This meant that my clothes were
    much more likely to get stained and dirty during the day. When I only wear clothes in the office,
    everything stays cleaner and nicer. This might not be that big of a deal if you work in jeans and a
    t-shirt. I have an office job where I wear I wear a silk blouse, a nice skirt, and pumps -- it makes
    a difference.

    On the spending side: I eat a lot more lunch. Before regularly riding my bike, I'd have a lady's
    lunch of a green salad, or a yogurt and an apple. Now I have the carne asada plate, or a slice of
    pizza and a large caesar, you know what I mean? If I don't take my lunch, the cost of spending twice
    as much out really adds up. Might even be the equivalent of what I'd spend at the gas pump. The
    other side of that one is, I personally enjoy the carne asada plate much more than a yogurt and an
    apple, or five gallons of gas, for that matter.

    On the saving side: I no longer pay $75/month at the health club. And although I spend money on bike
    clothes, I used to spend some on aerobics outfits, so maybe that cancels out the other, too. Also,
    you save time -- when you combine your commute with your work out, the fact that your commute now
    takes an additional 20-30 minutes a day is still more than off-set by the fact you don't have to
    drive to the health club on top of your regular driving commute.

    When I ride into work this morning, I'll think about this some more.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist at:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
     
  8. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Michael Tordoff" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Now, about the cheapest source of calories is a Big Mac with supersize fries.

    Not when you do your own home cooking.

    I bet my homemade beef stroganoff has way more calories than that McD stuff, for less cost, serving
    for serving. Especially with all that sour cream. Same with chicken paprikash. Sausages with mashed
    spuds and steamed savoy cabbage on the side, or corned beef hash, or pot roast, etc. are all dirt
    cheap, and easy to prepare. Because ya aren't paying extra for convenience.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD

    remove NO_SPAM. from address to reply
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, C P
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping since
    >it is not so convenient to take off to the store as it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only
    >buy the things I need and am able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    >means when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is
    >not a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my
    >overall shopping costs are way down.

    On the downside, I find I shop more at closer smaller (and slightly more expensive) places, and less
    at the big mega-marts that tend to be further away.

    But I doubt the difference in spending is anything near enough to justify a car just for grocery
    shopping, and in any case I'm happy to support businesses that are more ped/bike-friendly.--b.
     
  10. Lincoln Ross

    Lincoln Ross Guest

    My biking expenses are maybe $1/mile, but I've started again after a long pause anyway. Most of the
    cost medical expenses, mostly paid by the driver who hit me. I suspect that number will go down.

    Sparhawk wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 15 Jan 2003 23:46:33 GMT, "C P" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping
    > >since it is not so convenient to take off to the store as it is with a car. Therefore when I shop
    > >I only buy the things I need and am able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my
    > >backpack, so that means when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make
    > >room for. There is not a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating,
    > >like cookies. So my overall shopping costs are way down.
    >
    > You'll probably save a lot of money on health costs also, unless that is you are killed or injured
    > in traffic someday.
    >
    > Sparhawk

    --
    Lincoln Ross NOTE ADDRESS CHANGE: [email protected]
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 16 Jan 2003 00:27:54 GMT, <[email protected]>, "Tom Gauldin"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What about little things like rain, sleet, snow, freezing weather and strong winds?

    That's what's called the "joys of cycling". One quickly learns that we do not melt in the rain,
    sleet is better than slush, winds can shift and it rarely, if ever, snows in Las Vegas. What's
    your point?
    --
    zk
     
  12. "Tom Gauldin" <[email protected]> spake thusly on or about Thu, 16 Jan 2003
    00:27:54 UTC

    -> What about little things like rain, sleet, snow, freezing weather and strong -> winds? ->

    dragged $150 worth of groceries home in the trailer -35 C 25 k wind in my face out bound at my back
    on the way home 5 k trip because I went off to the library before shopping. I was at the library
    before an auto would have warmed up.

    what was your point?
    --
    I hurt before the ride so fibro gives me a head start on the rest of the pack. silver lining?
    [email protected]
     
  13. Tom Gauldin

    Tom Gauldin Guest

    If you really spent over a hundred bucks on a darned bicycle, I have a bridge I'd like to sell you
    in NYC. That's absurd. I guess there's a sucker born every minute.

    --

    Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV NEW EMAIL [email protected] NEW PHONE (702) 263-8804 voice/fax

    "Monty Montgomery" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]...
    > I keep a spreadsheet to keep track of my costs. My initial intent was to rasionalize how little
    > money it costs to ride my bike when looked at it in dollars per hour. As you can see on the
    > table below I included everything from the bike to patch kits. Man, was I suprised. The only
    > hope is that
    I
    > keep on riding at the rate I have in the last couple of years. If I keep
    up
    > this pace the bike will get inexpensive in a year or two... I hope...
    >
    > Oh, by the way, gas and car repairs cost over $4000 last year. Now that
    is
    > expensive.
    >
    > My cost per mile is $0.43 My cost per hour is:$7.73 That is with 12,571 miles on my biles.
    >
    >
    > Initial Bike Cost 12/29/2000 $3,656.14 Total Spent $5,396.71 Shorts $165.00 Jersey etc
    > $260.00 Chains $180.00 Miles Ridden 12571.4 Tires $300.00 2001 5064 Computer $20.00 2002
    > 7412 Overhaul(chain, brake hoods) $180.00 2003 95 co2 $80.00 Ave MPH 18 Pump $15.00 Gloves
    > $50.00 Hours Ridden 698.4111 Helmets $250.00 Tire Tubes $50.00 Cost per Hour $7.73 Chain
    > Lube $24.00 Chain Cleaner $25.00 Cost per Mile 0.429285 new tire,chain,SpinSkin $114.07
    > chain, derailleur adjustment $27.50
    >
    >
    > "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles
    > > stating that I had to prove to them that I had insurance during the time after I dumped my old
    > > insurance company and
    > signed
    > > up for a new one. Otherwise it would be a fifty dollar fine.
    > >
    > > The letter went into the wastebasket.
    > >
    > > A couple of weeks later a notice appeared from NCDMV that my plates were revoked and I was
    > > instructed to send in the plates for 30 days, pay the
    > fine
    > > and to not drive the car. I pick up a beat up old Schwinn World at
    > Goodwill
    > > for 10 bucks, and 50 dollars into a bike repair tool kit, and am soon
    > riding
    > > my bike to work daily.
    > >
    > > By this time, I am happy riding my bike around, enjoy the exercise and
    low
    > > cost, so I decide the car has to go. I have found that I get around just fine on the bike, and
    > > enjoy riding it immensely why pay for travel
    inside
    > a
    > > box anyway? I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the fines I have paid this
    > > year).
    > >
    > > Depreciation - 500 Gas - 300 (+/- 100) Insurance - 600 Car 'Property' Taxes / Licensing Fees -
    > > 100 (or so) Repair / Maint (includes emissions inspection) - 500 +/- 100 (a
    > conservative
    > > figure)
    > >
    > > About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs.
    > > There is the cost of knowing that if you dont do
    > this
    > > or that with the car by such and such time there will be this and that happen to you with X
    > > financial penalties as result. That worry is gone
    > once
    > > the car is gone.
    > >
    > > There is one other thing that should be considered. Oil prices will
    > probably
    > > to go up in the next 5 to 10 years, and because of looting of taxpayer money, states will be
    > > looking for more ways to tax the hell out of
    people
    > to
    > > make up the difference. Odds are that car owners will be getting soaked
    > even
    > > more. So I figure it is best to get rid of the car now, before these
    costs
    > > take affect.
    > >
    > > That puts an extra 2000 a year (or maybe more) in the bank to spend how
    I
    > > please when the car is gone. So of the 2000 I save will be spent on occasionally renting a car
    > > on a as needed basis, If I rent a car once a month for getting major things done, cats to the
    > > vet, big ticket
    shopping,
    > > etc, the yearly cost is 500, still way less than what I am paying now by owning a car. The rest
    > > of the money can be invested or blown on
    something
    > I
    > > want.
    > >
    > > But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do
    a
    > > lot less shopping since it is not so convenient to take off to the store
    > as
    > > it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only buy the things I need and
    > am
    > > able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    > means
    > > when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can
    make
    > > room for. There is not a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating,
    > > like cookies. So my overall shopping costs are
    way
    > > down.
    > >
    > > I find that I am getting more exercise, will there be lower health care costs as a result? I
    > > think so.
    > >
    > > Just curious, why don't more people think like this?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  14. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    "Mike S." wrote:

    > one word: convenience.
    >
    > Mike "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles
    > > stating that I had to prove to them that I had insurance during the time after I dumped my old
    > > insurance company and
    > signed
    > > up for a new one. Otherwise it would be a fifty dollar fine.
    > >
    > > The letter went into the wastebasket.
    > >
    > > A couple of weeks later a notice appeared from NCDMV that my plates were revoked and I was
    > > instructed to send in the plates for 30 days, pay the
    > fine
    > > and to not drive the car. I pick up a beat up old Schwinn World at
    > Goodwill
    > > for 10 bucks, and 50 dollars into a bike repair tool kit, and am soon
    > riding
    > > my bike to work daily.
    > >
    > > By this time, I am happy riding my bike around, enjoy the exercise and low cost, so I decide the
    > > car has to go. I have found that I get around just fine on the bike, and enjoy riding it
    > > immensely why pay for travel inside
    > a
    > > box anyway? I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the fines I have paid this
    > > year).
    > >
    > > Depreciation - 500 Gas - 300 (+/- 100) Insurance - 600 Car 'Property' Taxes / Licensing Fees -
    > > 100 (or so) Repair / Maint (includes emissions inspection) - 500 +/- 100 (a
    > conservative
    > > figure)
    > >
    > > About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs.
    > > There is the cost of knowing that if you dont do
    > this
    > > or that with the car by such and such time there will be this and that happen to you with X
    > > financial penalties as result. That worry is gone
    > once
    > > the car is gone.
    > >
    > > There is one other thing that should be considered. Oil prices will
    > probably
    > > to go up in the next 5 to 10 years, and because of looting of taxpayer money, states will be
    > > looking for more ways to tax the hell out of people
    > to
    > > make up the difference. Odds are that car owners will be getting soaked
    > even
    > > more. So I figure it is best to get rid of the car now, before these costs take affect.
    > >
    > > That puts an extra 2000 a year (or maybe more) in the bank to spend how I please when the car is
    > > gone. So of the 2000 I save will be spent on occasionally renting a car on a as needed basis, If
    > > I rent a car once a month for getting major things done, cats to the vet, big ticket shopping,
    > > etc, the yearly cost is 500, still way less than what I am paying now by owning a car. The rest
    > > of the money can be invested or blown on something
    > I
    > > want.
    > >
    > > But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping
    > > since it is not so convenient to take off to the store
    > as
    > > it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only buy the things I need and
    > am
    > > able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    > means
    > > when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is not
    > > a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my
    > > overall shopping costs are way down.
    > >
    > > I find that I am getting more exercise, will there be lower health care costs as a result? I
    > > think so.
    > >
    > > Just curious, why don't more people think like this?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    you are obviously a raving fanatic commie hippie! I suggest you buy an SUV and forget this childish
    nonsense! Best regards, Bernie (3 yrs gasoline free - mostly)
     
  15. Garmonboezia

    Garmonboezia Guest

  16. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    "Mike S." wrote:

    > one word: convenience.
    >
    > Mike "C P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > It started a little over a year ago, when I got a letter from the NC Department of Vehicles
    > > stating that I had to prove to them that I had insurance during the time after I dumped my old
    > > insurance company and
    > signed
    > > up for a new one. Otherwise it would be a fifty dollar fine.
    > >
    > > The letter went into the wastebasket.
    > >
    > > A couple of weeks later a notice appeared from NCDMV that my plates were revoked and I was
    > > instructed to send in the plates for 30 days, pay the
    > fine
    > > and to not drive the car. I pick up a beat up old Schwinn World at
    > Goodwill
    > > for 10 bucks, and 50 dollars into a bike repair tool kit, and am soon
    > riding
    > > my bike to work daily.
    > >
    > > By this time, I am happy riding my bike around, enjoy the exercise and low cost, so I decide the
    > > car has to go. I have found that I get around just fine on the bike, and enjoy riding it
    > > immensely why pay for travel inside
    > a
    > > box anyway? I figure the yearly costs are as follows, (not including the fines I have paid this
    > > year).
    > >
    > > Depreciation - 500 Gas - 300 (+/- 100) Insurance - 600 Car 'Property' Taxes / Licensing Fees -
    > > 100 (or so) Repair / Maint (includes emissions inspection) - 500 +/- 100 (a
    > conservative
    > > figure)
    > >
    > > About 2000 dollars a year for a car, more if you have fines. But wait, there are other costs.
    > > There is the cost of knowing that if you dont do
    > this
    > > or that with the car by such and such time there will be this and that happen to you with X
    > > financial penalties as result. That worry is gone
    > once
    > > the car is gone.
    > >
    > > There is one other thing that should be considered. Oil prices will
    > probably
    > > to go up in the next 5 to 10 years, and because of looting of taxpayer money, states will be
    > > looking for more ways to tax the hell out of people
    > to
    > > make up the difference. Odds are that car owners will be getting soaked
    > even
    > > more. So I figure it is best to get rid of the car now, before these costs take affect.
    > >
    > > That puts an extra 2000 a year (or maybe more) in the bank to spend how I please when the car is
    > > gone. So of the 2000 I save will be spent on occasionally renting a car on a as needed basis, If
    > > I rent a car once a month for getting major things done, cats to the vet, big ticket shopping,
    > > etc, the yearly cost is 500, still way less than what I am paying now by owning a car. The rest
    > > of the money can be invested or blown on something
    > I
    > > want.
    > >
    > > But I save money in other ways too. I find that when I am on a bike I do a lot less shopping
    > > since it is not so convenient to take off to the store
    > as
    > > it is with a car. Therefore when I shop I only buy the things I need and
    > am
    > > able to carry. I ride home with groceries home in my backpack, so that
    > means
    > > when I buy groceries, the food I buy is usually the essentials I can make room for. There is not
    > > a lot of money that goes unneccessary foods I am better off not eating, like cookies. So my
    > > overall shopping costs are way down.
    > >
    > > I find that I am getting more exercise, will there be lower health care costs as a result? I
    > > think so.
    > >
    > > Just curious, why don't more people think like this?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    More people don't think like this because you are obviously a raving Commie Hippie who is unwilling
    to consume for his country. I suggest you get yourself a SUV and get to Safeway! Best regards,
    Bernie (3 years gasoline free - more or less)
     
  17. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 16 Jan 2003 04:13:47 GMT, <%[email protected]>, "Monty
    Montgomery" <[email protected]> spent:

    \snip
    > co2 $80.00 Pump $15.00

    Very cool!

    From California's "Riverside Daily Enterprise" of 25 August 1896.

    Hey diddle diddle The bicycle riddle, The strangest part of the deal; Just keep your accounts - Add
    up the amounts; The 'sundries' cost more than the wheel.
    --
    zk
     
  18. On 16 Jan 2003 07:27:45 -0800, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote:
    >On the saving side: I no longer pay $75/month at the health club. And although I spend money on
    >bike clothes, I used to spend some on aerobics outfits, so maybe that cancels out the other, too.
    >Also, you save time -- when you combine your commute with your work out, the fact that your commute
    >now takes an additional 20-30 minutes a day is still more than off-set by the fact you don't have
    >to drive to the health club on top of your regular driving commute.

    There's a very good example of why a bike is a Good Thing[tm]. I also happen to think the people you
    meet while riding are nicer than those who only frequent health clubs.
    >
    >When I ride into work this morning, I'll think about this some more.

    I have three forms of transport. Two kinds have two wheels. I only use the four wheel method
    when I absolutly must. (Corporate guests don't much like riding on the back of a Virago 1100 or
    a Gary Fischer.)

    Now, if I could just figure out how to get one two wheeler to carry the other, I'd be set. :)
     
  19. Doug Kennedy

    Doug Kennedy Guest

    On Wed, 15 Jan 2003 18:27:54 -0600, Tom Gauldin wrote:

    > What about little things like rain, sleet, snow, freezing weather and strong winds?
    >

    Wear a jacket?

    I enjoyed 30mph winds and 25deg F temperatures this morning on the ride to work. I was very
    comfortable wearing a jacket and a bacaclava, I do need some thicker mittens. I'm especially looking
    forward to the ride home, with the wind instead of against it.

    > Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV

    I never realized the weather in Las Vegas was so... interesting ;) You'd better check out
    http://www.enteract.com/~icebike/ right away.

    - Doug Kennedy
     
  20. Doug Kennedy

    Doug Kennedy Guest

    On Wed, 15 Jan 2003 22:13:47 -0600, Monty Montgomery wrote:

    > I keep a spreadsheet to keep track of my costs. My initial intent was to rasionalize how little
    > money it costs to ride my bike when looked at it in dollars per hour. As you can see on the table
    > below I included everything from the bike to patch kits. Man, was I suprised. The only hope is
    > that I keep on riding at the rate I have in the last couple of years. If I keep up this pace the
    > bike will get inexpensive in a year or two... I hope...

    Looking over your list, I would have to say your costs are actually inexpensive. You're riding a
    top-of-the-line, 'sports car' bike and probably letting a shop take care of most of your
    maintenance.

    Think about what you'd spend on a Italian sports car, running low-milage / high-performance race car
    tires, and hiring a pit crew to service it. Yes, you're getting off cheap ;)

    Now myself I bought a more expensive bike than strictly necessary to get back and forth to work. But
    I am a bike connoisseur and use the bike for club rides, family rides, shopping, delivering packages
    to the post office, even some trail riding. So I consider the extra cost to be worth it, one could
    even say the commuting use is free since I would have bought the bike anyway for the recreational
    purposes. I have a lot of 'bike clothes' but don't use them to ride to work. My incremental cost of
    riding to work is near zero (wear and tear) and my incremental benefit is recyling time wasted
    driving (now enjoyable exercise).

    Doug Kennedy
     
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